Cinderella Dowry

THE

Cinderella Dowry

Volume One

The Becky Thatcher Edition

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Remastered by Urban Fair Trade LLC

Dedicated to R.D.C. & D.E.M.

Cinderella Dowry is a series of remastered cookeries from various vintage sources.

A “Cinderella Dowry” was the collection of skills and social graces that young women acquired in anticipation of marriage to someone with a higher social and economic status than that of the young woman’s own family.

Each remastered book was selected for the likelihood that it would have been an important learning tool in the life of a major female character in a classic work of fiction.

For this first installment of Cinderella Dowry, we chose The Kentucky Housewife, a cookery that was popular in the southern United States during the 1840s. That was the era when Tom Sawyer and his friends were having adventures and Becky Thatcher and her girl friends would have been preparing for their eventual marriages.

Cookeries are historical journals that reveal a great deal about who people were and what mattered to them on a very intimate level.


EDITOR’S NOTE: Cinderella Dowry was originally remastered for use in Urban Fair Trade’s Literacy Program as background for Becky Thatcher, an important, but under-represented character in Mark Twain’s Tom Sawyer.

We retained the original, casual, un-alphabetized style of The Kentucky Housewife. We added an index to help locate specific items. We apologize for the amount of white space on some pages. (Equivalent to 37 full pages)

We didn’t want to split recipes between pages, unless it was absolutely necessary.

At the end of the index, we added definitions for outdated terms and measurements, including the preparation temperatures listed in the recipes as various kinds of wood powered ovens.

You will need to modify some recipes to avoid problems with sanitation and possible food allergies.

THE

KENTUCKY HOUSEWIFE

A

COLLECTION OF RECIPES FOR COOKING.

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by Mrs PETER A WHITE

PREFACE

HAVING always regarded a cookery book as a book for — the kitchen, I have, in order to carry out my idea, not only been explicit in giving proportions, but have endeavored to express myself so simply that any cook who can read can take this book and be her own teacher.

When I call for a coffee cup full in measuring, I mean one that holds thirteen tablespoons; a teacup full, one that holds eleven tablespoons; a cooking-spoonful, one that holds two tablespoons.

Mrs. P. A. W.

BREAKFAST

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COFFEE

Some think that mixing coffee improves it. To those who think so, I would suggest one third Mocha and two thirds Java.

The coffee must be carefully roasted. A few grains roasted too much will make the coffee taste bitter. If not enough roasted, it will give the whole a very raw taste. I think the old idea of roasting coffee every day is necessary to have it perfect, has in a great measure been given up. Twice a week, or even once and it will be just as good, if you keep it airtight.

To make it, allow two heaping tablespoons to every pint of boiling water. First, scald out the coffee pot; put in the coffee, with white of the egg; beat well; then add a tablespoon of cold water, so as to have the coffee thoroughly moistened; pour on the boiling water; let it boil twelve minutes, stirring the grounds down once when it boils up the first time.

Pour out a cup full to see if clear, then pour it back; throw in half a teacup full of cold water; let it stand five minutes and pour off the grounds immediately. If for strong after-dinner coffee, put two tablespoons and a half to one pint of boiling water.

TEA

Three things are essential in order to have good tea. First, the water must be boiling when it is poured on the leaves; second, the water must be boiled for the “purpose; third, the tea must be freshly drawn.

For black tea, one teaspoon for each person is a fair allowance; to that, allow a large teacup full of boiling water and after pouring on the number of cups required, allow an extra cup and an extra teaspoon of tea.

Oolong tea does not require so long to draw as the Souchong tea, say five minutes for the former and ten for the latter.

For green tea, allow one teaspoon and a half to each quart of boiling water and don’t let it stand over three minutes.

Always scald out the pot, which should be of earthenware.

First, pour on one half of the water and after allowing the time required for drawing the different teas, pour on the other half of the water.

CHOCOLATE

Five squares of chocolate, One pint of new milk, One pint of rich cream.

Break the chocolate into very small pieces; pour on it two tablespoons of boiling water and let it stand half an hour; then mash perfectly smooth.

Boil the milk and cream and add by degrees to the chocolate; boil hard for ten minutes, beating well, with an egg-beater, until it becomes light and frothy.

It is better to serve it immediately, but if it must stand, put it in a saucepan with hot water underneath, the object being to keep it hot, but not to allow it to cook any more.

If Maillard’s chocolate is used, do not add anything to it; but if it should be Baker’s chocolate, sweeten and flavor with vanilla.

If cream should not be convenient, all new milk will answer.

Cocoa can be made in the same way, only flavor and sweeten.

BREADS, ETC

THE FIRST YEAST

Two yeast cakes, Four good-sized potatoes, One tablespoon of hops, Four tablespoons of flour, Two tablespoons of granulated sugar, One tablespoon of salt.

Put the potatoes on, without peeling, in a quart of water and when almost done, add the hops; when the potatoes are done, peel them and mash through a colander; then strain the water they were boiled in and while boiling hot, mix in the potatoes, salt and the two yeast cakes, which have been previously soaked for an hour in a teacup full of warm milk.

THE SECOND YEAST

Four peeled potatoes, Four tablespoons of flour, Two tablespoons of granulated sugar, One tablespoon of salt.

Let the first yeast stand all day; at night, boil the four potatoes until soft; mash them through a colander and add a teaspoon of the water they were boiled in, the flour, sugar and salt; when cold, mix it with the first yeast, let it stand overnight and in the morning it will be ready for use.

Keep in a cool place and make fresh every two weeks.

POTATO YEAST

Six large potatoes, One tablespoon of flour, One tablespoon of white sugar.

Peel the potatoes and put them in a saucepan, with water enough to cover them well. Boil until perfectly soft, take them out, leaving the water on the fire.

Mash them smooth with the flour and sugar and stir in by degrees a quart of the water. Let this boil and strain through a colander.

When lukewarm, stir in a cake of Fleischman’s yeast, having previously dissolved it in a little water.

Let it rise and when light, put it in the ice-chest or a cool place.

Fresh yeast can be made by using a teacup full of this instead of Fleischman’s, or a teacup full of brewer’s yeast.

Yeast should be made twice a week in the summer.

TO MAKE THE BREAD

One teacup full of yeast, One quart of flour, One tablespoon of lard, One teaspoon of salt, One tablespoon of granulated sugar, Half a pint of water.

Put the yeast, lard, salt and sugar in the flour, then the water.

Work until it blisters, which will take from fifteen to twenty minutes.

Put a little lard on top and put into a wooden bowl.

Let it rise from five to six hours, then make out into rolls.

Let them rise for about an hour and a half, then bake in a quick oven.

If for loaves, they will require two hours for the second rising and a more moderate oven for baking.

BAKING POWDER BISCUITS

One quart of flour, Three teaspoons of baking powder, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, One teaspoon of salt, One pint of milk.

Sift the flour, then put in the baking powder, salt and butter; mix thoroughly with the hands and pour in the milk.

Roll only once, half an inch thick; cut with a biscuit cutter and bake twenty minutes in a quick oven.

Begin to make these biscuits just half an hour before they are to be eaten, allowing ten minutes to mix them.

The dough should only be stiff enough to roll, so add more milk if needed.

BAKING POWDER FLANNEL CAKES

One quart of well-sifted flour, Three well-beaten eggs, One cooking-spoonful of butter and lard, Three heaping teaspoons of baking powder, Milk enough for a thick batter, Salt to the taste.

Mix the flour, salt and milk and beat hard, then add the well-beaten yolks and lard and butter melted.

Beat the whites of the eggs very stiff and stir in slowly. Lastly, sift in the baking powder.

BREAD OR ROLLS

Two quarts of flour, One pint of potato yeast, One pint of cold water, One tablespoon of lard, One dessertspoonful of white sugar, A heaping teaspoon of salt.

Mix all the ingredients together and work well for fifteen minutes. Set it aside to rise.

If in the summer, put in a cool place, if in the winter, put in a warm place.

When light, work it for fifteen minutes more.

Don’t make into loaves or rolls until two hours and a half before baking in the winter and two hours in the summer.

This will allow half an hour for baking the rolls and an hour for the loaves.

Have a quick oven for the rolls and a more moderate one for the loaves.

BREAD CAKES

Half a pint of stale bread, One pint of flour, One dessertspoonful of lard and butter mixed, One teaspoon of baking powder, Two eggs and salt to taste.

Take a pint of sweet milk and pour it over the bread to soak for half an hour; then add the well-beaten yolks and flour, alternately.

Should the latter be too stiff, add a little more milk, as it should be the consistency of flannel cakes.

Beat well until the bread and flour are thoroughly mixed.

Melt the butter and lard and stir in, adding salt to the taste.

Sift in the baking powder; lastly, beat the whites very stiff and stir in slowly. Have the griddle hot and well-greased.

BUCKWHEAT CAKES

One pint and a half of buckwheat, One coffee cup full of corn meal, One teacup full of yeast, One tablespoon of lard and butter, mixed One tablespoon of thick molasses, One quart of water, Salt to the taste.

Let the water be lukewarm and beat into it alternately, the buckwheat and corn meal.

Add lard and butter, melted, the molasses and salt and lastly the yeast.

If wanted for breakfast, put to rise at 9 o’clock the night before.

If for tea, at 11 o’clock in the morning — that is if potato-yeast is used. Fleischman’s is much quicker.

Just before baking stir in half a teaspoon of soda.

BUCKWHEAT CAKES II

One quart of buckwheat flour, Two cooking-spoonfuls of corn meal, Half a coffee cup full of yeast, One teaspoon of salt, One quart and a half of milk and water, One tablespoon of lard and butter, mixed.

Mix the buckwheat with the milk and water, meal, salt and yeast.

Beat well with a large spoon and put into a stone jar to rise over night.

The first thing in the morning stir the batter down and just before baking stir in two-thirds of a teaspoon of soda.

Mix it with milk.

Bake on a quick and well-greased griddle.

To make them brown nicely, a tablespoon of New Orleans molasses should be added just before the yeast.

TO COOK CORN GRITS

One coffee cup full of grits, Three coffee cup fulls of boiling water, One teaspoon of salt.

Put the grits in the water with the salt and boil steadily an hour and a half, stirring frequently while boiling.

Just before it is done add a small cup full of milk.

CORN MEAL BATTER CAKES

One pint of corn meal, Two-thirds of a pint of buttermilk, A small teaspoon of soda, One teaspoon of butter, One dessertspoonful of flour, Yolks of two eggs, the white of one, Salt to the taste.

Sift the corn meal well; beat the soda in the buttermilk until it foams, then stir in the meal.

Add the well-beaten yolks, then the salt, lastly, the whites of the eggs, beaten to a froth.

This batter should be thin and well stirred up from the bottom, when baking each cake.

Bake on a well-heated and well-greased griddle.

If buttermilk or sour milk cannot be had, use sweet milk and a teaspoon of baking powder sprinkled in just before the whites of the eggs.

CORN MEAL MUFFINS

One pint of corn meal, Two-thirds of a pint of sour milk, One dessertspoonful of lard and butter mixed, One saltspoonful of soda, A little salt, One egg.

Beat the soda in the milk until it foams.

Put the salt in the meal, add the milk and beat well, then the lard and butter melted.

Lastly, the well-beaten egg.

Bake quickly in molds.

If sour milk cannot be had, substitute sweet milk and a teaspoon of baking powder.

CORN MEAL MUSH

One teacup full of sifted meal, One quart of cold water, Salt to the taste.

Let the water come to a boil and stir in the meal, by degrees, then add the salt.

If after boiling for a while it is too thin, stir in a little more meal. If too thick, thin with a little milk. Stir often and boil slowly for three hours.

CORN MEAL MUSH BATTER CAKES

One pint of corn meal mush, Two tablespoons of flour, One teaspoon of baking powder, Salt to the taste, Two eggs.

Beat the yolks very light and stir in the mush, then add the flour, beating well all the time.

Put in the salt and whites of the eggs beaten to a froth.

Add the baking powder. Fry on a quick griddle and have it well-greased.

CREAM BISCUITS

One pound of flour, One pint of sweet cream, Half a teaspoon of salt.

Sprinkle the salt over the flour, mix in the cream with the hands thoroughly and pound or work until the dough blisters.

Shape or cut, then prick as for pounded biscuits and bake in a well-heated oven.

TO COOK CRUSHED INDIAN

One pint of Crushed Indian, Three pints of boiling water, One teaspoon of salt.

Put the boiling water in the saucepan with the salt, then stir in the Crushed Indian and stir constantly done; half an hour will cook it.

Just before it is done, add a little boiled milk.

ENGLISH MUFFINS

Three pints of flour, One pint of hot milk, Half a pint of yeast, A teaspoon of salt, Two eggs.

Put the flour into a bowl, pour the hot milk on it, mix well and when it cools slightly, stir in the yeast.

Let this rise and when light work over; add the two well-beaten eggs and salt.

When thoroughly mixed bake in rings on a well-greased and well-heated griddle and turn as you would flannel cakes.

Split and butter

If for breakfast and potato yeast is used, set them to rise at 10 o’clock the night before, or at 12 o’clock in the day if for tea

If quick yeast is used, they will rise in three hours.

FRENCH ROLLS

One pint of bread dough, One tablespoon of butter, One tablespoon of granulated sugar.

Put into the dough the butter and the sugar; work for about five minutes, then put it in a cool place until an hour before the rolls are to be baked.

Roll, cut, butter one-half of each and turn over the other half. Put in tins to rise and bake in a quick oven twenty minutes.

GERMAN WAFFLES

One quart of sweet milk, Half a pound of flour, A quarter of a pound of butter, Two tablespoons of quick yeast, Eight eggs, Salt to the taste.

Warm the milk; cut the butter up and with the salt, stir in the milk until melted; then the well-beaten yolks and flour in alternation.

Lastly, put in the yeast. Cover the pan with a cloth and set it in a warm place to rise.

Just before baking, beat the whites very stiff and stir in gently. Half this quantity can be made.

If wanted for breakfast, it would be better to set the batter to rise the night before and use potato yeast. Have the irons well heated and well-greased.

GOOD EGG BREAD

One quart of corn meal, One tablespoon of lard and butter, One teacup full of milk, One teaspoon of salt, Three eggs.

Pour a little boiling water over the meal to scald it; add the salt; stir in briskly the well-beaten yolks of the eggs, then the milk and lard and butter melted; lastly, the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Bake in a slow oven nearly an hour.

GOOD RUSKS

Two tablespoons of light dough, Four ounces of butter, Eight ounces of pulverized sugar, Four eggs.

The dough must be raised with yeast and flour enough must be mixed with it until it ceases to stick to the hand.

Add the well-beaten eggs and the butter melted, lastly the sugar.

Roll out and shape with the hands.

Put on tins to rise and when very light, which will be in about an hour, bake in a quick oven twenty minutes.

The crust would be improved by sprinkling a little pulverized sugar and ground cinnamon over each rusk, about ten minutes before taking them out of the oven.

GRAHAM BREAD

Two quarts of brown flour, One teacup full of fresh yeast, One teacup full of molasses, One dessertspoonful of lard, One teaspoon of salt.

Mix the flour with a little lukewarm water, add the molasses, salt and yeast.

Work well and set it to rise.

After it has risen make into loaves; let it rise for the second time; grease it on top with a little lard to prevent it from cracking.

Bake in a moderate oven.

GRAHAM MUFFINS

One pint of sweet milk, One teacup full of Graham flour, One teacup full of white flour, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, Two teaspoons of baking powder, One egg and a little salt.

Stir the flour in the milk, add the melted butter, salt and well-beaten egg. Mix thoroughly and lastly, sift in the baking powder. Bake quickly, in well-greased muffin molds.

HOMINY MEAL MUFFINS

One quart of hominy meal, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One teaspoon of salt, Three eggs.

Scald the meal well and stir in milk enough to make a stiff batter; add the yolks of the eggs well beaten; salt; lastly, the whites beaten to a froth.

Warm and grease the molds and bake in a well-heated oven thirty minutes.

LIGHT BISCUITS

One pint of sweet milk, One quarter of a pound of butter, One teacup full of yeast, Three well-mashed potatoes, A saltspoonful of salt.

Warm the milk and butter, put in flour enough for a soft sponge, then put in the yeast and salt.

Let it rise, work in the potatoes and add more flour, until a nice dough is made, but don’t have it quite as thick as bread dough.

Let this rise again and one hour before kneaded, roll, cut, put into pans and bake in a quick oven.

These are for tea; but if wanted for breakfast, make them up the night before and work the first thing in the morning.

Use a small teacup in measuring the yeast.

LIGHT ROLLS

Two quarts of flour, Three pints of sweet milk, Two tablespoons of melted butter, Two tablespoons of white sugar, Half a teacup full of potato yeast, A saltspoonful of salt.

Put the flour in a bowl and make a hole in the center of it.

Warm the milk, pour in it the butter, melted, salt and sugar, lastly the yeast.

Set this to rise over night.

Early in the morning knead for about twenty minutes.

When it blisters, roll, cut and put into pans, set it in a warm place to rise again, which will take about an hour and a half.

Bake in a quick oven.

If wanted for supper set them to rise early in the morning.

LOAF BREAD WITHOUT LARD

Two quarts of flour, One pint of potato yeast, One pint of cold water, A dessertspoonful of sugar, Salt to the taste.

Put the flour into a bowl and mix in the water, sugar, yeast and salt.

Work for fifteen minutes, make into loaves, put them in greased pans and let them rise until light.

Bake for three-quarters of an hour in a quick oven.

It will take nearly two hours after the working before the loaves will be ready for baking.

MUFFINS

Six ounces of flour, Four ounces of butter, Half a pint of sweet milk, Half a teaspoon of salt, Three eggs.

Put the butter and flour together, beat the yolks of the eggs very light and with the milk add to the mixture by degrees.

Lastly, put in the salt and the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Put into well-greased and heated molds and bake quickly.

MUFFINS TO BAKE ON A GRIDDLE

One pint of warmed milk, One teaspoon of melted butter, Two tablespoons of yeast, Half a saltspoonful of soda, One teaspoon of salt, Flour enough for a thick batter, Two eggs.

Mix with the warmed milk the two well beaten eggs, melted butter, salt and soda, previously dissolved in a tablespoon of hot water.

Beat in sufficient flour to make a thick batter, then put in the yeast.

Set in a warm place to rise for three hours, if in the summer; if in the winter it will take an hour longer.

When light, heat the griddle, grease it well with butter.

Grease the rings, put them on the griddle and half fill with batter.

When one side is done turn and bake both sides a light brown.

When done, break them open, butter and serve very hot; never cut them. If cold they can be toasted lightly on each side and buttered.

OATMEAL BATTER CAKES

One pint of cooked oatmeal, One teacup full of flour, One pint of sweet milk, Two teaspoons of baking powder, Salt to the taste, Two eggs.

Beat the oatmeal and flour in the milk, alternately, until thoroughly mixed, then the well-beaten yolks and salt to the taste.

Beat the whites to a froth and stir in gradually.

Lastly the baking powder.

Fry on a quick and well-greased griddle.

TO COOK OAT FLAKES

One coffee cup full of oat flakes, One quart of boiling water, Half a teaspoon of salt.

Put the boiling water into the saucepan with the salt and stir in the oat flakes. Let this boil steadily for half an hour, stirring constantly.

Add a little boiled milk to keep it from being too stiff.

Boil half an hour longer, continuing to stir, then serve.

OATMEAL GRITS

One coffee cup full of fine oatmeal, One quart of boiling water, One teaspoon of salt.

Put the salt in the boiling water, sprinkle the meal lightly in with one hand while stirring it with the other.

When thoroughly mixed, let it boil steadily for one hour without stirring it more than necessary to keep it from sticking, for the steam swells the grains and makes them light.

POP OVERS

Two teacup fulls of flour, Two teacups of sweet milk, One teaspoon of butter, Half a teaspoon of salt, The yolks of two eggs, the whites of three.

Mix the milk and flour, then add the well-beaten yolks.

Beat well for five minutes, stir in the melted butter.

Beat the whites to a froth and stir slowly in.

Heat and grease the molds well, fill just half full with the batte.

Bake quickly and serve immediately.

Use the largest sized teacup for measuring.

POTATO BISCUIT

Three pints and a half of flour, Three tablespoons of baker’s yeast, One pint of warm sweet milk, A quarter of a pound of butter, One teaspoon of salt, Two potatoes, boiled, Two eggs.

Sift the flour twice; mix through it the teaspoon of salt.

Make a hole in the center and put in the yeast and warm milk.

Let this stand a quarter of an hour.

Mash the potatoes and mix in the yeast and milk with the butter and well beaten eggs.

Put it before the fire for an hour and a half; then mix all together and let it rise until light, then take a pint of flour for shaping.

Cut off small pieces and shape lightly into cakes, as they are better not rolled.

Let them rise again in the pan and when they begin to crack open bake in a quick oven ten minutes

POTATO CAKES WITH BAKING POWDER

Three pints of flour, One cooking- spoonful of lard and butter, mixed, Three teaspoons of baking powder Six mashed potatoes, A saltspoonful of salt.

Sift the baking powder in the flour and add the salt.

Rub the butter through the flour with the hands, then the mashed potatoes; and put in milk enough to make it mix well, but don’t let it be too soft.

Roll, cut and bake quickly. Split and butter while hot.

These are very nice for breakfast.

POTATO ROLLS

Two tablespoons of flour, One teacup full of yeast, One tablespoon of melted butter, Two boiled potatoes, A saltspoonful of salt.

Boil the potatoes, peel and mash them smoothly with the flour, adding enough of the water the potatoes were boiled in to make the consistency of thin mush.

Then pour in the melted butter and when cold, add the yeast.

Put it away until morning in a moderately warm place. This is the sponge and will be risen by daylight.

Work into this sponge a quart of flour, shape as rolls and put away for an hour and a half.

Bake in a quick oven.

If in the winter, the kitchen will do to have them in.

If in the summer, put them where there has been no fire.

The second rising will require a warmer place than the first rising.

POUNDED BISCUIT

One quart of flour, One cooking-spoonful of lard and butter, mixed; One teaspoon of salt.

Sift the flour into a bowl, sprinkle the salt, then rub in the lard and butter. Now add milk, or milk and water enough for a stiff dough.

Pound, or work, for fifteen or twenty minutes.

If the dough blisters and snaps when you pull it, it is worked enough.

Roll, cut and stick with a fork.

Have a good oven; bake and brown nicely.

POUNDED BISCUIT II

One pound and a half of flour, A quarter of a pound of lard, One teaspoon of salt, Ice water enough, to make a stiff dough.

Mix thoroughly with the hands and pound or work until the dough blisters.

Roll or shape with the hands, or cut and bake in a well-heated oven, but don’t bake too quickly.

Don’t forget to prick nicely with a small fork.

RICE FLANNEL CAKES

One teacup full of well boiled rice. One even tablespoon of lard and butter mixed. One teaspoon of baking powder. Two pints of flour, One quart of sweet milk, Salt to the taste, Two eggs.

Beat the yellows of the eggs very light, add the milk, flour, rice, lard and butter, melted and the salt.

Beat all well together, then stir in the whites beaten to a froth. Lastly, sift in the baking powder.

Bake on a well-heated and well-greased griddle. The rice must be soft enough to mash with a spoon.

RICE MUFFINS

One teacup full of well-boiled rice, One teaspoon of butter, One pint of flour, Half a teaspoon of salt, One egg.

Melt the butter and mix with the rice, add the well-beaten egg, flour and milk enough, in alternation, to make a batter of medium thickness.

Bake in a well-heated oven in molds.

A teaspoon of baking powder can be added if desired.

RICE MUFFINS WITH CORN MEAL

Five tablespoons of corn meal, Five tablespoons of flour, Five tablespoons of well-boiled rice, One tablespoon of lard and butter, One teaspoon of baking powder, One teaspoon of salt, Two eggs

Mix the meal and flour, with milk enough to make a thin batter.

Add the well-beaten eggs, rice, melted butter, lard and salt.

Lastly, the baking powder.

Bake quickly in molds, in a well-heated oven.

RICE WAFFLES

One teacup full of well-boiled rice, One pint and a half of flour One teaspoon of baking powder, One dessertspoonful of butter and lard mixed, One teaspoon of salt, One quart of milk, Three eggs.

Soak the rice for half an hour in the milk; stir in the flour, the well-beaten yolks of the eggs, lard and butter melted and salt.

Beat well and add the well-beaten whites of the eggs; lastly, the baking powder.

The irons must be well greased and very hot.

ROLLS

Two quarts of flour, One pint of yeast, One pint of cold water, A tablespoon of lard, A tablespoon of granulated sugar, Salt to the taste.

Mix the flour, water, sugar and melted lard together, then add the yeast and salt.

Work for fifteen minutes and let it rise until light, then shape into rolls and let them rise again until light.

Bake in a well heated oven for twenty-five or thirty minutes.

It takes about two hours after the last rising before the rolls will be ready to bake.

ROSETTES

Four teacup fulls of flour, One quart of sweet milk, Two tablespoons of butter, Half a teaspoon of salt, Three eggs.

Beat the yolks of the eggs very light and stir in the milk.

Add the melted butter and sift in the flour, then the salt.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and mix through gradually.

Warm and grease the pans and bake in a good oven.

SALLY LUNN

One quart of flour, One quart of milk, One tablespoon of lard, One tablespoon of butter, One teaspoon of salt, One tablespoon of white sugar, Half a pint of yeast, Three eggs.

Stir the yellows of the eggs in the milk.

Add the flour, sugar, melted lard and butter, then the yeast.

When risen, add a little more flour, enough to make a soft dough

SALT RISING BREAD

Two-thirds of a pint of milk, Two tablespoons of corn meal, One teaspoon of salt, One tablespoon of white sugar, One tablespoon of lard.

Mix the salt and meal, pour on the boiling milk and stir until it thickens.

Put it on the table about nine o’clock at night to rise.

In the morning add hot water enough to warm it, then stir in flour enough to make it quite thick, adding the sugar and melted lard.

Make into loaves and set it to rise in a warm place. When light, bake in a moderately quick oven.

SPANISH BUNS

One pound of granulated sugar, Three-quarters of a pound of flour, One coffee cup full of cream, One coffee cup full of dried currants, Six ounces of butter. Two teaspoons of baking powder, Four eggs.

Cream the butter and flour.

Beat the yellows of the eggs very light with the sugar and add to the flour.

Wash, pick and dry the currants; flour well and mix through.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and stir in slowly.

Lastly sift in the baking powder. Bake in a well-heated oven.

WAFFLES

One pint of flour, One pint of sour cream, or buttermilk, One dessertspoonful of lard and butter mixed, Half a teaspoon of soda, A little salt, One egg.

Stir the soda in the milk until it foams, then add the flour and lard and butter melted, beating well all the time.

Beat the egg separately, adding the yellow first, then the white. The salt should be put in the flour dry.

Bake in well-greased and well-heated irons.

WAFFLES II

Two pints and a half of flour, One cooking-spoonful of butter and lard mixed One pint of milk, Half a teaspoon of salt, One teaspoon of baking powder, Two eggs.

Mix the milk and flour, then the well-beaten yolks of the eggs.

Stir in the butter and lard melted and salt.

Beat well and add slowly the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Sift in the baking powder.

Waffle batter should always be thin.

Should this batter be too thick, thin with equal portions of milk and water.

Bake quickly in well-heated and well-greased irons.

WAFFLES III

Half a pound or flour, Half a pound of butter, Half a pint of sweet milk, Salt to the taste, Six eggs.

Cream the butter and flour; add the milk and well-beaten yolks of the eggs in alternation.

Should this be too stiff, add more milk, as waffle batter should be thin.

Lastly, stir in gently the well-beaten whites.

Bake quickly in well-greased and well-heated waffle irons.

YEAST FLANNEL CAKES

One quart of flour, One pint of sweet milk, One tablespoon of lard, One tablespoon of butter, One tablespoon of yeast, One saltspoonful of salt, Three eggs.

Beat the milk and flour together until thoroughly mixed, then add the lard and butter melted and the yeast.

Let this rise and just before baking beat the eggs separately, stir in the yolks, then the whites beaten to a froth.

Bake on a quick and well-greased griddle.

If you wish rice in them, when you put in the yolks of the eggs you can add a teacup full of rice that has been boiled until it can be mashed with a spoon.

If these cakes are made of potato yeast put them to rise over night, if wanted for breakfast.

If for supper put them to rise at twelve o’clock.

If quick yeast is used they will be light in three hours.

If the batter should taste at all sour add a saltspoonful of soda just before baking.

YEAST MUFFINS

Three teacup fulls of flour, One quart of sweet milk, One cooking-spoonful of butter, Half a teaspoon of salt, Half a teacup full of yeast, Three eggs.

Mix the milk with the flour, beat the yolks of the eggs and, with the butter melted and salt, add to the flour.

Lastly the yeast.

Put this to rise at ten o’clock the night before.

Just before baking the next morning beat the whites very stiff and stir slowly into the batter.

Grease and heat the molds and bake thirty minutes in a quick oven.

If these muffins should be wanted for supper put them to rise at twelve o’clock that day.

YEAST WAFFLES

One pint of flour, A quarter of a pound of butter, Half a pint of milk, Two tablespoons of yeast, Four eggs.

Beat the yellows, stir in the milk, then the flour and butter melted, with a little salt.

Add the yeast; lastly, the well-beaten whites.

If for supper, put the batter to rise three hours before.

If for breakfast, make the batter over night.

ADDITIONAL BREAKFAST COURSES

BEEF

DRY BEEF HASH

One pint of chopped beef, One pint of mashed potato, Half a teacup full of cream, A teaspoon of chopped onion, A teaspoon of chopped parsley, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Have the beef, that has either been boiled or roasted, free from all fat.

Mix with the potato, cream, onion and parsley, add the salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Stir in a skillet or bake in an oven for twenty minutes.

If baked, put in a dish, sprinkle some breadcrumbs on top and put here and there some small pieces of butter.

A tablespoon of butter can be added when mixing.

TO COOK SAUSAGES

Make into small cakes half an inch thick, dredge with a little flour and fry in a skillet with a small piece of lard until a dark brown

SAUSAGE MEAT

Eleven pounds of tenderloins, Seven pounds of leaf fat, Four heaping tablespoons of powdered sage, Three teaspoons of salt, Four tablespoons of ground black pepper, One teaspoon of cayenne pepper.

Chop or grind the meat as fine as possible.

Put in “the salt and pepper; lastly, the sage.

Mix well with the hands and fry in little cakes.

SAUSAGE MEAT II

Five pounds of tenderloins, Four pounds of leaf fat*, Four tablespoons of ground sage, One tablespoon of black pepper, One tablespoon and a half of salt, One teaspoon of cayenne pepper.

*The fat that lines the abdominal cavity and encloses the kidneys

Pick out the strings from the fat and the pieces of skin from the tenderloins before weighing.

Run through the meat grinder twice; put in the seasoning and mix well with the hands.

Pack in a stone jar and keep in a cool place.

Fry in small cakes.

SAUSAGE MEAT III

Three pounds of tenderloins, Two pounds of leaf fat*, Two heaping tablespoons of powdered sage, Two tablespoons of ground black pepper, Half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper, One heaping teaspoon of salt.

*The fat that lines the abdominal cavity and encloses the kidneys

Grind the tenderloins and fat as fine as possible; add the sage, pepper and salt and mix thoroughly with the hands.

Then put in a stone jar and keep in a dry, cool place.

When cooking, make into small, round cakes and fry a very dark color.

ONE WAY TO COOK A STEAK

A nice, tender beefsteak, Butter, black pepper and salt.

Wipe the steak dry and pepper it well with black pepper.

Put it on a gridiron before a bright fire.

Broil one side until half done and do the other side the same way.

Have ready a pan over hot water, with a large piece of butter, black pepper and salt.

Press the steak well on each side, return to the fire and broil a few minutes longer.

Have a dish heated, put the steak on it and pour over the butter in which the steak was pressed.

Never salt a steak until half cooked.

ANOTHER WAY TO COOK A STEAK

A nice tender steak, Tomato or walnut catsup, Black pepper and butter.

Put a little butter in the skillet and when quite hot put in the steak.

Press and turn in the butter until nearly done, then take it out, put in a little walnut or tomato catsup and let it stew for a minute.

Return the steak to the skillet, press it for a few minutes longer, then put it on a heated dish and the gravy over it.

BEEF STEW FOR BREAKFAST

One quart of beef cut in dice, One dessertspoonful of chopped onion, One pint of cold boiled potatoes cut in dice, One cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One dessertspoonful of flour.

Put the beef and onion into a skillet, with water enough to cover and simmer for twenty minutes and add the potatoes and cook five minutes longer.

Put the flour and batter together, stir in and when it thickens, season.

Have ready, in a heated dish, some nicely cut pieces of buttered toast and pour the stew over them.

A little summer savory can be added if desired. Cold roast beef must be used.

EGGS

TO BOIL EGGS

Wash the eggs and put them as wanted into a kettle of boiling water.

If wanted soft, boil three minutes, if wanted harder, boil five minutes.

If wanted for salad, boil fifteen minutes, then put them in cold water, so as they will peel easily.

Always eat soft-boiled eggs as soon as they are done.

EGGS WITH CHEESE

Two ounces of grated Parmesan cheese, Two chopped spring onions, Two tablespoons of sherry wine, One ounce of butter, Six eggs.

Put the grated cheese into a saucepan with the chopped onion and sherry wine.

Stir all over the fire until the cheese is thoroughly melted.

Beat the eggs, put them into the saucepan with the cheese and stir over a slow fire until done.

Have some nicely cut pieces of hot fried toast and pour the mixture over them.

A teaspoon of chopped parsley would be a pleasant addition stirred in the cheese before it is melted.

OMELETTE

One teaspoon of flour, One teaspoon of chopped parsley, A saltspoonful of chopped onion, A tumbler of milk, A large cooking-spoonful of butter, Eight eggs.

Beat the eggs together very light, add the milk and the flour.

Then the onion, parsley, salt and black pepper to the taste and melted butter.

Have ready some butter in a well-heated pan.

Pour in one half of the mixture and shovel to the middle of the pan, so as to have it in the shape of a half moon.

Let it brown nicely and turn into a heated disk.

Make another omelette out of the remaining half.

SMALL OMELETTES

Half a teacup full of milk, Two tablespoons of stale breadcrumbs, Half a teaspoon of chopped parsley, One dessertspoonful of butter, Five eggs, salt and black pepper to the taste, A saltspoonful of chopped onion.

Soak the breadcrumbs in the milk, stir in the well- beaten yolks of the eggs.

Beat hard and add the parsley, onion, salt and black pepper; then the butter, melted.

When ready to fry, beat the whites to a stiff froth and stir in slowly.

This will make five small omelettes, or one large omelette.

TO POACH EGGS

One pint of boiling water, One saltspoonful of salt, As many eggs as required.

Put the water in the skillet with the salt, let it boil, then break the eggs carefully into it, one at a time and let them poach for three minutes.

Take them out carefully and put each one on a round, thin slice of buttered toast and then on a well-heated dish.

TO PRESERVE EGGS FOR WINTER USE

A piece of lime the size of a quart bowl, Half a pound of cream of tartar, Two quarts of water, Salt sufficient to float an egg.

Slack the lime by degrees with a little boiling water. keeping it well covered during the process.

Add the water, cream of tartar and salt. Let this preparation stand for a week.

Place the eggs in a wide mouth crock or tub, with the little ends down, being sure that each end is perfectly sound.

Place on them a thick cloth, then a plate with a weight on it, to keep the eggs in place.

Lastly, pour over the pickle, taking care to have all the eggs well covered.

Eggs preserved in this way will keep fresh for nearly a year.

HAM

TO DEVIL HAM

A few thin slices of cold boiled ham, Mixed mustard, breadcrumbs and black pepper.

Pepper the slices of ham, spread the mustard on them and sprinkle with grated breadcrumbs.

Roll each piece and tie a thread loosely around.

Put them in the oven, with some butter in the pan, for about ten minutes, basting the pieces with the butter as they are cooking.

The thinner the slices are cut, the better.

HAM OMELETTE

One teacup full of chopped ham, One dessertspoonful of butter, Black pepper to the taste, Six eggs.

Cold boiled ham must be used for chopping.

Put in black pepper to the taste and add the well-beaten yolks and a tablespoon of butter melted.

Lastly, beat the whites of the eggs very light and stir slowly in.

Have ready a hot pan with some butter in it, pour in the mixture and when done, fold over and serve in a well-heated dish.

OTHER

LAMB CHOPS

They should be neatly trimmed; the bone scraped, peppered and rolled in butter; then broiled with great care.

When done, put more butter on them, also some salt and black pepper.

Wrap little ruffles of white paper around the ends of the sticks; place the chops nicely around the dish and have a center of tomatoes, peas, champignons or mashed potatoes.

Chops are also nice dipped in breadcrumbs, after broiling and browned in lard and served as above.

MUTTON OR LAMB STEW

One pound of lamb or mutton, One medium sized onion, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, Half a pint of milk, Six potatoes.

Take cooked mutton and cut into dice.

Boil the potatoes and cut them also into dice.

Have the milk boiling in the skillet, then put all in and stew for ten minutes.

Cream the butter and flour and stir in the mutton until it thickens.

Have in the dish some hot buttered toast and pour the stew over them.

The onion should also be boiled before putting in the stew and chopped fine.

COLD MUTTON HASH

One pint of chopped mutton, One pint of chopped potatoes, One medium sized onion chopped fine, Half a teaspoon of powdered summer savory, A cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Put the potatoes and onion in a skillet with enough water to cover.

Stew for half an hour and add the butter, summer savory, mutton, salt and pepper.

Stir for ten minutes and serve on pieces of buttered toast.

Should the hash be thin, mix with the butter a teaspoon of flour.

Cold beef hash can be made in the same way.

TONGUE TOAST

One boiled tongue, A teacup full of cream, Yolk of one egg, A half-teaspoon of mixed mustard.

After the tongue has been well boiled and is perfectly cold, either grate or mince very fine.

Mix with it the cream, the well-beaten yolk of the egg and the mustard.

Simmer two or three minutes.

Cut off the crust of some slices of bread, toast nicely and butter well.

Heat a flat dish, lay the slices of toast on it, spread the mixed tongue on them and send to the table hot in a covered dish.

This makes a nice breakfast or supper dish.

For tongue, substitute cold boiled ham.

TURKEY HASH

One quart of chopped turkey, One pint of potatoes cut in dice, One cookingspoonful of chopped celery, Half a coffee cup full of cream, A dessertspoonful of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Put the potatoes and celery in a skillet, with water enough to cover and stew for half an hour.

Then put in the turkey, cream, salt and pepper and let all come to a boil,

Mix the flour with a little of the liquid of the hash and stir in until it thickens.

If cream is not to be had, substitute milk and a tablespoon of butter and if celery is not convenient, put in a teaspoon of chopped onion and summer savory, to the taste.

TURKEY HASH II

One pint of chopped turkey, One pint of mashed potatoes, A half teacup full of cream, Two tablespoons of chopped celery, A cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Mix the turkey, potato and cream well together; add the celery, salt and cayenne pepper; melt the butter and stir in.

Put all into a skillet and stir for five minutes, or put into a dish, sprinkle breadcrumbs and pieces of butter on top and bake in an oven for twenty minutes.

If not baked, when putting it in the dish have ready in it some pieces of hot buttered toast.

TURKEY HASH III

Take what cold turkey you have, chop very fine, add the stuffing, a little water and a cooking-spoonful of butter.

Stir for ten minutes and serve on nicely cut pieces of buttered toast.

Should there be no stuffing left, put in as much mashed potatoes as you have chopped turkey and cook as directed.

TO MAKE VEAL HASH

One quart of chopped veal, One teaspoon of chopped onion, Two tablespoons of tomato catsup, One cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One teaspoon of flour.

Cut in dice a quart of the cold fillet of veal, cook the onion before chopping, put it with the veal, a pint of hot water, salt and pepper into a skillet.

While it is simmering, wet the flour and butter together and stir in until it thickens, then add the catsup.

Have pieces of buttered toast about four inches square in a heated dish and pour the hash over them.

The stuffing can be added instead of the flour if preferred.

WELSH RARE BIT

Half a pound of new cheese, The yolk of one raw egg, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Melt the cheese slowly and add by degrees dry mustard to the taste, then the salt and cayenne pepper; thin with beer.

Have some nicely cut pieces of buttered toast and spread the cheese on them.

WELSH RARE BIT II

Half a pound of fresh cheese, Half a teacup full of cream, One teaspoon of mixed mustard, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, One teaspoon of butter.

Put the cheese in the dish you intend serving this in and let it be one that will stand the heat.

While it is melting, mix the mustard with the cream; melt the butter and add; then season to the taste.

Let it come to one simmer, stirring all the time to have the ingredients well mixed, then serve immediately.

Let it stand for a moment or two after you stop stirring, so as to have the top smooth.

OFFAL

CALF’S HEAD SOUP

One pelted calf’s head, A knuckle of veal, A pint of turtle beans, Three gallons of water.

Soak the head in water over night, putting in a cooking-spoonful of salt in the water.

Take out the brains and put them in another pan of salted water, changing the water until the blood is all drawn out.

The next morning, put in the calf’s head and veal, or a set of calf’s feet, into the three gallons of water and boil six or seven hours, until the head is perfectly tender; then take it out of the water; remove the bone, cut the meat into small pieces and put them back into the soup.

Season with black pepper, salt, sweet marjoram and summer savory, to the taste.

Put the Mexican beans also to soak overnight and boil until thoroughly done.

Then pass through a sieve and add the soup.

Make egg balls with the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, one raw egg and flour enough to mix them with.

Roll out the size of a hazelnut.

Take two pounds of cooked fillet of veal, chop very fine, season with salt, pepper, sweet marjoram and one small onion chopped fine.

Add half a cup full of breadcrumbs and one egg.

Mix all together with a wooden spoon and make into small balls with a little flour.

Fry in boiling lard, a cinnamon brown.

Put this in the ice-chest with the soup and fry the balls as you wish each day.

When serving, put some slices of lemon in the tureen and pour the soup over them, adding the force meatballs, egg-halls and wine to the taste; also, the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs mashed fine.

If you do not use the black beans, brown a little flour or sugar to color the soup with.

Put the brains in a cloth, boil till tender.

Mash the yolks of two hardboiled eggs and mix with the brains, adding black pepper and salt.

Boil the calf’s tongue until tender and put the brains in spoonsful around the tongue, alternating with a slice of lemon.

This will make a nice side dish.

CALF’S HEAD SOUP II

One calf’s head, Six quarts of clear water, Two bunches of parsley, One teaspoon of ground allspice, Half a teaspoon of ground cloves, One teaspoon of powdered summer savory, One pint of sherry wine, Salt, cayenne and black pepper to the taste, One onion.

Boil the head until the meat drops off of the bones, which will take about four hours.

Take out the bones and chop the meat very fine.

Take the brains for the force-meat balls.

Also, chop very fine the onion and parsley and mix with the meat, adding cayenne and black pepper, salt, spices, summer savory, a cooking-spoonful of butter and a dessertspoonful of flour.

Boil ten minutes and just before serving heat the wine and stir it in.

Serve a slice of lemon, yolk of a hard-boiled egg and a force meat ball in each plate; or, mash the yolks of six hard-boiled eggs very smooth and stir in the soup.

FORCE MEAT BALLS FOR CALF’S HEAD SOUP

Half a pound of well-cooked veal, One calf’s brains, Salt, cayenne pepper and nutmeg to taste, Two eggs.

Chop the brains and veal as for mince meat; mix with the eggs, salt, cayenne pepper and nutmeg.

Flour a board, drop a small piece here and there, roll into balls in the flour, using as little flour as possible.

Throw them into boiling lard and fry a dark brown.

Drain and when cool put into the soup.

A spoonful or two of fine breadcrumbs can be used in mixing the balls if desired.

TO STUFF A CALF’S HEART

One calf’s heart, Four tablespoons of soaked bread, Half a teaspoon of chopped onion, Half a teaspoon of powdered summer savory, A tablespoon of butter, Yolk of one raw egg, Salt, cayenne pepper and nutmeg to the taste.

Mix the ingredients thoroughly.

Make a little hole in the heart and put the ingredients in with a piece of fat, bacon, skewered over the end.

Put on in water enough to keep it well covered and boil for an hour.

FOR THE GRAVY

Take a coffee cup full of water the heart has boiled in, mix a teaspoon of browned flour with a tablespoon of butter.

Stir in the gravy until it thickens and add a cooking-spoonful of wine. Pour this over the heart.

TO STUFF A CALF’S LIVER

One calf’s liver, One pint of breadcrumbs, One chopped onion, One teaspoon of summer savory, One teaspoon of chopped parsley, Salt, black pepper and mace to the taste.

Take out all the veins of the under side and make deep incisions on the other side.

Mix the stuffing well together and put carefully in the incisions and skewer each tightly.

Pepper and dredge with flour, not forgetting to put two thin slices of pickled pork on top.

Put into a pan, with a pint of water.

Baste well for an hour and a quarter, then take out of the pan, thicken the gravy with a little browned flour, adding allspice and wine to the taste. Pour over the live and serve very hot.

CALF’S HEAD A LA TERRAPIN

One calf’s head, One pint of the water the head has boiled in, One teaspoon of allspice, One tablespoon of white flour, One teaspoon of browned flour, Two large cooking-spoonfuls of butter, Half a tumblerful of Madeira wine, Salt, cayenne pepper and mace to the taste.

Boil the calf’s head until perfectly done.

Chop up the meat with the brains, taking out the bones and gristle.

Put into a saucepan, with the pint of water it has boiled in.

Let it simmer.

Mix perfectly smooth the butter and flour, adding two tablespoons of the liquor.

Stir into the calf’s head.

Add the allspice, mace, salt and cayenne. Let it simmer until it thickens and just before taking it off the fire, pour in the wine.

Garnish the dish with thin slices of lemon.

This is just as delicious baked.

Take out the brains and parboil.

Put the head in a pot with cold water enough to cover it and the onions whole, with a little salt.

Boil until tender enough to take out all the bones.

Then season with cayenne pepper, salt, cloves and nutmeg to the taste.

Dredge with flour and fry a light brown.

Season the brains also with salt, nutmeg, cayenne pepper, to the taste.

Add the butter, yolk of the egg and two rolled crackers.

Mix well with the hands, shape into little cakes and fry a light brown.

TO MAKE THE GRAVY FOR FRIED CALF’S HEAD

Two-thirds of a pint of water the head has boiled in, Two tablespoons of butter, A dessertspoonful of flour, A wine glass of wine, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste.

CALF’S HEAD FRIED

One calf’s head, Yolk of one egg, A tablespoon of butter, Two rolled crackers, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste, Ground cloves and nutmeg to taste, Two large onions.

Mix the flour and butter perfectly smooth and stir in the two-thirds of a pint of the water the head has boiled in.

Then the salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Boil until it thickens and just before taking it off, add the wine glass of wine.

Put the calf’s head in the center of the dish, pour the gravy over it and garnish with thin slices of lemon and sprigs of parsley, in alternation, until the head is covered.

Put the little cakes, made of the brains, around the dish.

BRAINS IN SHELLS

One quart of brains, One tumblerful of sweet cream, One cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One teaspoon of flour.

Soak the brains until the blood has disappeared entirely from them, pick the gristle and bone from them and parboil until white and tender.

Then add the cream, butter, flour, pepper and salt and stew until done.

Break up the brains with a spoon until fine, put them in shells with grated breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter on top and put them into the oven to brown.

This recipe applies to hogs’ brains. Calves’ brains can be cooked the same way and a little of the extract of celery put in just before filling the shells is a great improvement.

TO FRY HOGS’ BRAINS

One quart of brains, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt, black pepper and powdered sage to taste, Four eggs.

Beat the eggs together and mix with the brains.

Heat the skillet, put in the butter and when melted add the brains.

Stir rapidly all the time, as you do when scrambling eggs.

When half done add the salt, black pepper and powdered sage, continue to stir and when they cease to stick to the skillet they are done.

This makes a delicious dish for breakfast.

Be sure to wash all the blood from the brains and pick out all the pieces of bone and the strings.

TO PREPARE HOGS’ BRAINS

When they are taken from the heads they must be picked, skinned and washed, changing the water while washing until it is clear.

Put them into a bucket of cold water with some salt, soak for fifteen minutes and they will be ready for use.

Stew or fry.

They can be kept for ten days by soaking them in salt and water and changing the water every third day.

TO STEW HOGS’ BRAINS

One quart of brains, One teacup full of sweet cream, One tablespoon of butter, Salt, black pepper and powdered sage to the taste.

After the brains have been well washed and picked, put them into hot water enough to cover them and stew ten minutes.

Pour off the water, stir in the cream, butter, pepper, salt and sage. Simmer for five minutes longer and serve.

TO BOIL HOGS’ FEET

Two dozen pigs’ feet, A good deal of water, A large cooking-spoonful of salt.

Put the feet into a large pot and cover with lukewarm water, adding the salt.

Simmer slowly until thoroughly done, which will take four or five hours.

The bones must be loose, but they must not be allowed to remain in the water until they are ready to fall out.

When done, put in a large, wide-mouthed jar and cover with the water they were boiled in.

Put in the following spices: one coffee cup full of whole allspice, half a teacup full of whole cloves, one coffee cup full of whole black pepper grains.

Lastly, add a third as much vinegar as you have water.

Watch them closely, so as not to let the water and vinegar be absorbed entirely, but when you see it disappearing add more according to directions.

TO FRY HOGS’ FEET

Three pigs’ feet, Two eggs, salt and pepper, One teacup full of breadcrumbs.

Slice the feet lengthwise; dip thoroughly first in the egg, then in the breadcrumbs, let them stand for about fifteen minutes so as the egg will be well dried upon them.

Have a good deal of hot lard in a deep skillet and fry as you would oysters.

The salt and pepper, to the taste, must be put in the eggs, which should be well beaten before dipping the feet in them.

TO STEW HOGS’ FEET

Some cold boiled hogs’ feet, Cream according to the quantity of feet Salt and pepper to the taste, A little sweet marjoram.

Take the quantity of feet you wish to serve, put them into a saucepan with a little hot water.

Cover and steam until perfectly soft and put in the cream.

Let it boil up once, rub the butter and flour together, add to the feet, boil up once more, season and put in a little sweet marjoram to the taste.

TO BAKE SWEETBREADS

Three sets of sweetbreads, Two tablespoons of butter and lard, One coffee cup full of breadcrumbs, Two eggs.

After the sweetbreads have been well boiled and are cold, roll them carefully first in the egg, then in the crumbs.

Let them stand, so as the egg and crumbs will dry on them, then have the lard and butter, half and half, in a hot skillet, put in the sweetbreads and baste constantly for fifteen minutes.

Serve either with a tomato or champignon sauce.

TO STEW SWEETBREADS WITH CREAM

One set of sweetbreads, One pint of rich cream, One dessertspoonful of butter, Two teaspoons of flour, Salt, cayenne pepper and nutmeg to the taste.

Cook the sweetbreads thoroughly, pick off the gristle and fat.

Cut into small pieces and put into a saucepan with the cream.

Boil five minutes and add the butter and flour well creamed.

Lastly the salt, cayenne pepper and nutmeg to the taste.

This quantity can be increased according to the number to be served.

TO FRY SWEETBREADS

Three sets of sweetbreads, One large coffee cup full of sweet milk, One teaspoon of flour, One dessertspoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One well-beaten egg. Three sets means six sweetbreads.

Wash them clean; put them into a kettle of boiling water, with a teaspoon of salt.

Boil slowly for twenty minutes, then throw them into cold water.

After five minutes, take them out and set them away to get cold.

Have ready the batter made of the above ingredients; split the sweetbreads, dip each piece into the batter and fry a nice brown in hot lard.

TO FRY SWEETBREADS II

Three sets of sweetbreads, One large coffee cup full of sour milk, One teaspoon of flour, One teaspoon of butter, One well-beaten egg, A saltspoonful of soda, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Wash the sweetbreads clean, put them into a saucepan with boiling water and half a teaspoon of salt.

Let them boil for twenty minutes, then put them into cold water for about fifteen minutes and put them aside to get cold.

Beat the egg, add the flour, then the butter melted.

Dissolve the soda in a little water and beat into the sour milk until it foams, then stir in the egg.

Season to the taste, split the sweetbreads, dip in the batter and fry in hot lard a cinnamon brown.

TO COOK CHAMPIGNONS WITH SWEETBREADS

Two cans of champignons, Two sets of sweetbreads, Three teaspoons of white flour, One teaspoon of brown flour, One pint of clear soup, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, Two wine glassfuls of wine, Mace, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Cook the sweetbreads thoroughly and break into small pieces, taking care to get off all the skin and gristle.

Cut up the champignons and put them, with their liquor, into a saucepan with the clear soup.

Boil three-quarters of an hour, then add the salt, pepper and mace, also the sweetbreads.

Mix the butter with the flour, put into the sweetbreads and stir until it thickens.

Just before taking the saucepan off the fire add the wine. Serve very hot.

TO PREPARE TRIPE (Cow’s Stomach)

Cold water, Tripe, Vinegar, Salt.

Scrape and wash the tripe thoroughly.

Put it in cold water and salt and soak for ten days.

Don’t put much salt in and just keep it covered with water and change it every other day.

Boil it for nine hours steady and it will be ready to fry, stew or boil.

If it is to be kept any length of time, it should be put in brine or vinegar.

TO STEW TRIPE (Cow’s Stomach)

One teacup full of cream, One tablespoon of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Three hard-boiled eggs, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Cut the quantity of tripe you intend stewing into small pieces, about two inches square.

Pat it into a saucepan, with equal quantities of milk and water, enough to cover well.

Boil half an hour, then stir in the cream.

Put the flour and butter together and add to it; after it has boiled five minutes longer, chop the hard-boiled eggs and stir them in.

A little vinegar and mixed mustard is an improvement.

SOUPS

TO BURN SUGAR FOR COLORING SOUPS

Half a pound of sugar, A tablespoon of water.

Put the sugar into a saucepan, with the water.

Stir constantly over the fire, until it has a rich dark-brown color, taking great care not to let it burn or get black.

Then pour in a teacup full of water. Let it boil five minutes longer; cool and strain through a coarse piece of muslin.

Put it in a bottle, cork tightly and use when needed.

ASPARAGUS SOUP

Three pounds of veal, Three bunches of asparagus, One gallon of water, One teacup full of cream, One tablespoon of corn starch, Salt and white pepper to the taste.

Put one-half of the asparagus in the water with the veal and boil in a closely covered pot for three hours, or until the meat is in pieces, or the asparagus is dissolved.

Strain and return to the pot and add the remaining half of the asparagus.

Season with salt and white pepper and boil twenty minutes longer.

Just before you take it off the fire add the cream, into which has been stirred a tablespoon of corn starch

Boil ten minutes longer and serve with nicely cut squares of fried toast. In the winter use celery instead of asparagus. (Three bunches will be the quantity required for this soup)

SOUP STOCK OF BEEF

One large shin bone, Four quarts of water, Two pounds of lean beef, Four carrots, three onions, Four turnips, one bunch of parsley, One teaspoon of celery seed, Salt to the taste.

Put the bone, which has been previously cracked in three pieces, into the soup-pot, with the water and beef cut into pieces the size of an egg and some salt. Boil slowly for an hour, skimming well until all of the grease is taken off.

Scrape the carrots, peel the onions and turnips, then quarter and, with the celery seed, add to the soup.

Let this boil slowly for four hours; take off, strain into a stone jar and keep in a cool place.

Veal stock can be made in the same way, by getting a large knuckle of veal and adding two pounds of the meat.

BLACK SOUP

One veal shank, One gallon of water, Two large carrots, One large onion, Three medium-size potatoes, One bunch of parsley, One bunch of summer savory, Half a pint of browned flour, One pint of Madeira wine, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Cut up the shank and put it on with the vegetables, salt and pepper, to boil slowly for four hours, skimming constantly while boiling; strain.

Put into a clean pot with the parsley, summer savory and browned flour.

Boil for one hour; take out the parsley and summer savory and, just before serving, heat the wine and put it in.

Put in the soup as many yolks of hard-boiled eggs, thin slices of lemon and force-meat balls* as you have guests to serve, allowing one yolk, one force-meat ball and a slice of lemon for each plate.

*Force Meat Balls: Forcemeat is heavily seasoned, ground meat that is used to make meatballs or patties and is often used as a stuffing. When made into balls, forcemeat is often used as a garnish, particularly for whole animal heads and stews.

CHEAP BLACK SOUP

The bones of a cold roasted turkey, One slice of pickled pork, A teaspoon of powdered summer savory, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One large carrot, One large turnip, One medium-sized onion, One bunch of parsley, One teacup full of cooking wine, Half a teacup full of browned flour, One gallon of water, Salt, black and cayenne pepper to taste.

Crush the bones, scrape and cut the carrot into four pieces, peel and cut the onion into four pieces and do the same with the turnip.

Put all into the soup pot with the butter and pickled pork.

Fry until well browned, then pour on the water and put in the parsley and summer savory.

Boil slowly for four hours, skimming carefully all the time.

Strain through a sieve, return to the soup pot, put in the browned flour and boil twenty minutes longer, then add the salt, pepper and allspice and just before serving, heat the wine and stir in.

Crush the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, put them in the tureen and pour the soup in.

ANOTHER RECIPE FOR BLACK SOUP

One three-pound beefsteak, Two carrots, One onion, Three potatoes, One bunch of parsley, Half a pint of browned flour, Half a teacup full of wine, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Cut the beefsteak up and put it on with three quarts of water.

Boil for four hours, skimming constantly

Peel and cut up the vegetables and put them into the soup.

Boil one hour longer and strain through a colander, then return to the soup pot.

Put in the parsley and browned flour, boil slowly an hour longer, heat the wine and pour in.

Make some force-meat balls* out of the meat and put in the soup, with some thin slices of lemon.

*Force Meat Balls: Forcemeat is heavily seasoned, ground meat that is used to make meatballs or patties and is often used as a stuffing. When made into balls, forcemeat is often used as a garnish, particularly for whole animal heads and stews.

BOUILLON, OR CLEAR SOUP

Four pounds of lean beef, Four quarts of clear water, One teaspoon of celery seed, Four large onions, Six large carrots, One bunch of parsley, Six blades of mace, Sixteen whole cloves, The whites of four eggs, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Cut the beef into pieces the size of a walnut, taking care not to leave a particle of fat on them.

Pour on the four quarts of water and let it boil up three times, skimming well each time; for if any of the grease is allowed to go back into the soup, it will be impossible to get it clear.

Scrape the carrots, stick four whole cloves firmly into each onion and put them in the soup.

Then add the celery seed, parsley, mace, pepper and salt.

Let this boil until the vegetables are tender, then strain through a bag, return to the soup pot and stir in the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Boil until the eggs gather to one side, skim off and color a delicate amber by burning a dessertspoonful of brown sugar and stirring it into the soup until sufficiently colored.

Wash the bag in warm water, pour the soup through again and serve.

CABBAGE SOUP

One large head of cabbage, Two quarts of clear water, One pint of sweet milk, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, One bunch of parsley, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Take off the outside leaves of the cabbage, cut it up and fry it with the butter until it commences to turn yellow.

Put it into a saucepan with the parsley, salt and cayenne pepper.

Boil one hour, take out the parsley, pour in the milk and boil fifteen minutes longer. Serve very hot.

CREAM CELERY SOUP

One quart of chicken soup, One dessertspoonful of butter, One dessertspoonful of corn starch, Three heads of celery, One quart of milk or cream.

Take the white part of the celery and chop it as fine as possible.

Put it to boil with the milk and let it cook until it can be rubbed through a sieve.

If too thick, after it has been rubbed through, add a little more milk.

Return it to the pot and add the chicken soup.

When it has boiled about ten minutes, rub the butter and corn starch together and stir in until it thickens.

Season to the taste with salt and white pepper.

CHESTNUT SOUP

Two quarts of Spanish chestnuts, Two quarts of chicken stock, One pint of rich cream, Salt, nutmeg and cayenne pepper to taste.

Shell the chestnuts, put them in a pan and cover with cold water. Let them scald until the inner skin can be taken off.

Put them on a sieve, to allow the hot water to drain off. While draining, pour on some cold water, so as the skins can be removed with the hand.

When they are well skinned, put them into a saucepan with the chicken stock and let them simmer until perfectly tender.

Then mash through the sieve into the same stock.

Season with nutmeg, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put it into a saucepan with hot water underneath, stirring all the time until it begins to simmer. Pour in the pint of cream and after stirring five minutes longer, serve.

SIMPLE CHICKEN SOUP

One coffee cup full of cream, One teacup full of well-boiled rice. One blade of mace, A saltspoonful of celery seed, One dessertspoonful of corn starch.

When boiling a pair of chickens for dinner, put in a blade of mace and a saltspoonful of celery seed.

After the chickens are done, take out two quarts of the water; skim well and add the cream, or rich milk; then the rice and the dessertspoonful of corn starch; season to the taste.

It will require about three quarts of water for a pair of chickens.

CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE SICK

One large chicken, Three pints of cold water, Three tablespoons of rice, One bunch of parsley, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Cut the chicken into four parts and wash in cold water;

Put the pieces into a saucepan with the three pints of water, a little salt, the rice and parsley.

Let it boil gently for an hour and a half, skimming constantly

Take out the meat and parsley and pour the soup into a bowl.

WHITE CONSOMME OF CHICKEN

Two large, fat chickens, Half a teaspoon of celery seed, One blade of rnace, One bunch of parsley, Salt and white pepper to the taste.

Cut each chicken into four parts; put them into cold water to cleanse them entirely from the blood.

In fifteen minutes drain and put them into the pot.

Tie the celery seed in a thin piece of muslin; add the mace and parsley; pour on three quarts of water and boil gently for two hours, if young; three, if old

Skim constantly and when they are tender, strain through a sieve.

This will answer also for white sauces and should be used instead of water for filling them up.

PUREE OF CHICKEN

One large chicken, One small knuckle of veal, Three quarts of water, A quarter of a pound of rice, One bunch of parsley, One blade of mace, Half a teaspoon of celery seed, A coffee cup full of boiling cream, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Put the chicken and veal on with three quarts of water, together with the rice, parsley, mace and the celery seed, tied in a muslin bag.

Boil gently until the chicken is thoroughly done, taking care to skim well all the time it is boiling.

Take out the veal, bone, cut and pound the chicken in a mortar; moisten it with a little of the stock and pass it through the colander.

Strain the stock, pressing the rice through the sieve.

Return the chicken to the stock, season and just before serving, pour in the cream. Heat thoroughly, but don’t boil.

CLAM SOUP

Fifty clams, A quarter of a pound of butter, A teaspoon of chopped parsley, One pint of cream, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste, Two quarts of hot water.

Strain the liquor from the clams and put it in the saucepan.

Let it boil ten minutes, skimming well while boiling.

Add two quarts of hot water, the butter and parsley; then the clams, chopped quite fine; lastly the cream, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Boil five minutes longer and serve. When adding the clams, be careful not to let the soup curdle.

CORN SOUP

Two dozen ears of corn, Two quarts of water, Two quarts of milk, Two tablespoons of butter, One tablespoon of flour, Salt and black pepper to taste.

Grate the corn, put the cobs in the water and when it comes to a boil take out the cobs.

Put in the grated corn and when it boils add the two quarts of milk,

Mix the flour and butter

Put in two tablespoons of the soup to have it smooth and keep it from curdling the soup, then stir it in the same pan and let it boil until it thickens.

Lastly, put in the pepper and salt.

GREEN PEA SOUP

Three pints of hulled peas, A knuckle of veal, Four quarts of water, Salt and pepper to the taste, One onion.

Put the water into a saucepan with the veal, onion, salt and pepper.

Boil until well skimmed, add the peas and boil steadily for two hours.

Strain through a colander, then through the sieve, pressing while straining.

Return to the saucepan and when it boils, add a tablespoon of butter, mixed with two teaspoons of flour and let it boil five minutes longer.

Have ready in a well- heated screen some fried toast, cut in dice and pour the soup over them.

GUMBO SOUP

Two large chickens, Two quarts of okra, Three large onions, One teaspoon of allspice, One bunch of parsley, Three quarts of water, One teaspoon of summer savory.

Skin and quarter the chickens, cut up the onions and put all into a saucepan with three slices of pickled pork and two tablespoons of butter.

Fry until the chickens are a light brown and put all into a soup-pot, adding the allspice, parsley, summer savory, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Let this boil slowly from ten o’clock, skimming frequently.

At twelve o’clock put on the okra, whole, in a separate pot, with water enough to cover well.

Boil for an hour and a quarter.

Half an hour before dinner, take the chicken out of the soup; pick out the bones and cut the meat in small pieces.

Put back into the pot and add the okra.

Let it come to a boil and serve.

This soup can be made in the winter out of canned okra and tomatoes.

To the above quantity of soup two cans must be used. This quantity is for a large family. Half the quantity can be made if preferred.

JULIENNE SOUP

Two quarts of clear soup, Two good-sized carrots, One good-sized turnip, Two large pieces of celery, One small onion, Salt to the taste.

Cut the vegetables in thin small squares.

Put the carrots, turnips and onions in the soup and boil steadily for three-quarters of an hour, then put in the celery and boil half an hour longer.

Poach some eggs, say one for each person, trim them around nicely, drop into the tureen, pour the soup over them just as it is ready to send to the table.

This soup can be served without eggs, according to taste.

Add the salt before putting in the eggs.

LEEK SOUP

Two medium sized onions, Six average sized potatoes, One slice of bread. Salt and pepper to the taste, Four leeks.

Out the leeks and onions into small pieces and fry in butter for ten minutes, add the potatoes, cut in two and the slice of bread.

Cover the whole with water and, boil until the potatoes are very tender, then mash.

Add clear soup until the proper thickness and boil over a slow fire for forty-five minutes.

The onions may be omitted if objectionable.

OKRA SOUP

One chicken, or a small knuckle of veal, Two quarts of clear water, Six large tomatoes, Four large onions, One quart of okra, One bunch of parsley, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, One teaspoon of summer savory, Half a teaspoon of powdered allspice.

Put on the chicken, or veal, in the water and let it boil up twice, skimming carefully until all of the grease is taken off.

Add the tomatoes, parsley, onions, summer savory, allspice, cayenne pepper and salt.

Put this on at breakfast time: at 12 o’clock, put in a separate saucepan the quart of okra, cut up in thin slices.

Boil for an hour, or until perfectly tender.

Half an hour before dinner, strain the soup and add the okra.

This is for a 2 o’clock dinner; if for a late dinner put on the meat and vegetables at 1 o’clock and the okra at 5 o’clock.

CREAM SAGO SOUP

One large old chicken, Eight whole white pepper grains, One large blade of mace, One pint of cream, or rich milk, The yolks of two raw eggs, Salt to the taste.

Put the chicken on with about three quarts of water, the pepper grains, mace and salt.

Boil until the chicken falls to pieces; strain and skim.

To every two quarts of stock, take three ounces of sago; wash it in hot water and boil it in the soup half an hour.

Beat the yolks of the eggs into half a pint of cream, or rich milk

Pour it gradually into the soup, taking care not to allow the soup to boil after the sago is put in and stir all the time while pouring in.

SOUP A LA REINE

Three fat chickens, One teacup full of breadcrumbs, Four hard-boiled eggs, One quart of cream, One teaspoon of celery seed, Three quarts of clear water, One bunch of parsley, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put on the chickens with the water, celery seed and parsley.

Boil about two hours.

Take out the chickens and strain the water they were boiled in through a cloth.

Soak the breadcrumbs in the water.

Take away the skin, gristle, bones and fat, leaving nothing but the lean of the chicken. Grind it and make a paste of it and the yolks of the four hard boiled eggs.

Press through a coarse sieve, stir into the stock and let it simmer for ten minutes, stirring well all the time. Then pour into a well heated tureen and serve very hot.

TO MAKE A SIMPLE SOUP STOCK

Make it either of beef shin or a knuckle of veal, as the vegetable stock is made, only leave out the vegetables and clear it with the whites of eggs, allowing one white to each quart.

Skim as you would clear soup.

SPLIT PEA SOUP

Three pints of split peas, A quarter of a pound of pickled pork, Four quarts of water, Three large onions, Two large carrots, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Soak the peas overnight.

In the morning put them on with the four quarts of water and a little salt.

Peel the onions, scrape the carrots and put them with the pork into the pot with the peas.

Boil steadily, but not too rapidly, for five hours, then take out the pork and vegetables and press well through a sieve.

Return to the fire, put in the pepper and more salt if necessary and let it boil up once.

Have ready in a well-heated tureen some small pieces of fried toast and pour the soup on them.

A teaspoon of celery seed tied in a thin muslin bag and put in at the same time with the vegetables, is quite an improvement.

Soup of navy beans can be made in the same way, only do not put in but a quart of beans.

TOMATO SOUP

One quart of tomatoes, One pint of clear soup, One pint of cream, One dessertspoonful of flour, One tablespoon of butter, Salt and pepper to the taste, A salt spoonful of soda.

Stew the tomatoes for about half an hour with the soda.

Rub through a sieve and return to the saucepan.

Heat the clear soup and cream and stir into the tomatoes.

Rub the flour and butter together, add to the soup.

Boil ten minutes; season and serve in a heated tureen with some pieces of fried toast cut in dice.

If made in the winter, canned tomatoes may be used.

TOMATO SOUP II

One quart of tomatoes, One pint of hot milk, One teaspoon of soda, One teaspoon of butter, One teaspoon of flour, One carrot, a saltspoonful of celery seed Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, Some small pieces of fried toast.

Put the tomatoes into a saucepan to boil, with the carrot and celery seed tied in a muslin bag and the soda.

When it has boiled twenty minutes take out the carrot and celery seed. Put into another saucepan the butter and when it bubbles stir in the flour; then stir in the hot milk, salt and pepper.

When this comes to a boil add the tomatoes.

Heat well, but do not boil.

Have the small pieces of fried toast in the tureen and pour the soup over them. The tomatoes must be thoroughly cooked and strained before putting them in the soup and they must be measured after they are cooked.

TOMATO SOUP III

Two cans of tomatoes, One pint of sweet milk, Six butter crackers, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One teaspoon of soda, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Rub the tomatoes through a sieve, put them in a saucepan and let them come to a boil.

Stir in the soda until it ceases to foam.

Add the milk, let it boil for about five minutes and stir all the time.

Take it off and put in the crackers, which have been previously rolled very fine.

Lastly, the salt and cayenne.

A SIMPLE MOCK-TURTLE SOUP

A knuckle of veal, Four calves’ feet, One bunch of parsley. One teaspoon of powdered summer savory, One gallon of water, Three blades of mace, Two large onions, Twelve whole cloves, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put the veal and calves’ feet into a pot with the water, parsley, summer savory, mace and onions, having previously stuck six of the cloves firmly in each onion.

Boil for four hours, skimming off carefully all the grease.

At the end of that time, strain through a cloth and let it stand overnight,

The next morning skim off any grease which may have risen on the top, put the stock into a pot, mix a small teacup full of browned flour, boil half an hour and put in the salt and cayenne pepper.

A little allspice and wine can also be added.

FORCE MEAT BALLS FOR A SIMPLE MOCK TURTLE SOUP

Half a pound of veal, Two tablespoons of chopped suet, Two tablespoons of breadcrumbs, The juice of one lemon, The yolks of three raw eggs, Mace, cayenne pepper and salt to the taste.

Pick enough meat off the knuckle and feet to make the half pound and chop as for croquettes.

Mix with the breadcrumbs the suet and yolks of the eggs, then add the lemon juice, mace, salt and cayenne to the taste.

Make into balls the size of a large hickory nut, roll in flour and fry in boiling lard for about five minutes.

Mash the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs and stir in the soup.

When serving allow a thin slice of lemon and about two of the balls to each person.

This will make soup enough for two dinners for a small family.

CANNED TURTLE SOUP

Two quarts of beef soup, Two tablespoons of brown flour, One tablespoon of butter, One dessertspoonful of chopped parsley, Two carrots cut in dice, Three tablespoons of ham cut in dice, One tablespoon of chopped onion, Yolks of six hard-boiled eggs, Salt, cayenne pepper and wine to the taste, One can of turtle.

Stir the ham, butter, onion, parsley and carrots together in a soup pot over the fire for five minutes.

Add the beef soup, brown flour, turtle, salt and cayenne pepper.

Boil fifteen minutes and add the hard-boiled eggs, chopped very fine, with the wine.

Have some thin slices of lemon and serve two with each plate.

Have the tureen heated with hot water before pouring in the soup.

CANNED TURTLE SOUP II

One quart of vegetable soup, One can of turtle, Four hard-boiled eggs, One teacup full of Madeira wine, Allspice, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, One cooking-spoonful of butter, Two teaspoons of browned flour.

Put the soup in a saucepan with hot water underneath and let it simmer for ten minutes, put in the turtle, salt, cayenne pepper, allspice and yolks of hard-boiled eggs, mashed smooth and boil for a few minutes.

Then cream the butter and flour and stir in the soup until it thickens.

Warm the wine and just before serving the soup pour it in.

Serve thin slices of lemon, with the seeds taken out, in each plate.

Have the tureen very hot before pouring in the soup.

TURTLE BEAN SOUP

One quart of turtle beans, Three quarts of water, A quarter of a pound of pickled pork, Yolks of four hard-boiled eggs, A dessertspoonful of flour, Two tablespoons of butter, A teacup full of Madeira wine, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Soak the beans all night in one quart of water and in the morning add the other three quarts and the pork.

Boil steadily, but not too hard, until the beans are perfectly soft, which will take about four hours.

Mash through the colander, then strain through a sieve, taking care to get all the beans through, except the hulls.

Return to the pot, thicken with the flour and butter and let it boil up once.

Chop the yolks of the hard-boiled eggs and as many thin slices of lemon as may be required, allowing one slice for each person.

Put these into a well-heated tureen and just before taking the soup off the fire, pour in the wine and add the salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Be sure to take the seeds out of the lemons and the pork out, before mashing the beans.

TURTLE BEAN SOUP II

A knuckle of veal, One medium-sized onion, One pint and a half of beans, One large carrot, Three quarts of water, Wine, salt and pepper, to the taste, One bunch of parsley.

Soak the beans over night; the next morning put them into a soup pot with the veal and let them boil one hour.

Peel and quarter the onions, scrape and cut up the carrot, which, with the parsley, put into the soup.

Boil two hours longer, pour through a colander, then through a sieve and return to the soup pot.

Cream two tablespoon of flour with a cooking-spoonful of butter, stir in the soup, let it boil ten minutes; then add the wine, salt and pepper.

Have in heated tureen some thin slices of lemon and yolks of hard-boiled eggs, allowing one of each to every plate and pour the soup over them.

VEGETABLE SOUP

Two quarts of well-made beef stock, Three large carrots, Two large turnips, Two large onions, One bunch of parsley, Three large tomatoes, One quart of clear water, One teacup full of milk, Two large potatoes, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Peel and cut the vegetables in small pieces, put into the stock and add the clear water, boiling for one hour.

Take out the parsley and rub the vegetables through a sieve; return to the stock, add the milk, salt and cayenne pepper and boil twenty minutes longer.

Have ready some fried toast cut in dice, put them in a well-heated tureen and pour the soup over them.

VERMICELLI SOUP

A quarter of a pound of vermicelli, Four pounds of veal, One gallon of water, Two large onions, Two large carrots, Half a teaspoon of celery seed, Eight whole cloves, One blade of mace, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put the meat into the pot with cold water; let it boil up three times, skimming carefully each time.

Scrape and divide the carrot; peel the onions and stick four whole cloves firmly in each onion; then, with the other ingredients, put into the soup and boil steadily until the veal and vegetables are tender.

Strain through a sieve; put back into the pot; beat up the whites of three eggs, stir in and let it boil until the eggs gather to one side.

Strain off and color with a little brown sugar.

Now break up the vermicelli into pieces about four or five inches in length, put it in the soup and boil until tender.

WHITE SOUP

Two large, fat chickens, Five quarts clear water, One teacup full of rice, Two small onions, Eight whole cloves, One large carrot, One bunch of parsley, One pint chopped celery, Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, One pint of rich cream, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Boil the chickens until thoroughly done, take them out and use the water they were boiled in for the stock.

Skim off all of the grease, put in the carrot, celery, parsley, salt, cayenne pepper and onions, with four whole cloves stuck firmly in each onion.

Boil until the rice is soft enough to thicken the soup without using flour.

Strain the soup, grind the chicken very fine, mash the yolks of the eggs until smooth and mix with the chicken.

Put this in the soup and boil about fifteen minutes.

Just before sending the soup to the table, boil the cream and pour in.

Fry pieces of toast in butter, put in the tureen and pour the soup over them.

FISH

A NICE WAY TO DRESS AND BAKE FISH

One good-sized white fish or haddock, One quart of milk, A quarter of a pound of flour, A quarter of a pound of butter, Two teaspoons of chopped parsley, One medium sized chopped onion, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste, Two eggs.

Boil the fish until done, take out the bones and sprinkle with a little salt and cayenne pepper.

Heat the milk, cream the butter and flour together and add to the milk.

Boil until thick.

When cool, stir in the eggs, parsley and onion.

Put in the baking dish a layer of fish and a layer of the sauce and so on until the dish is filled.

Cover the top with stale breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter.

Bake three quarters of an hour.

CLAM FRITTERS

Two cup fulls of sweet milk, Two cup fulls of flour, Fifty well chopped clams, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, Three eggs.

Beat the yellows of the eggs well, stir in gradually the flour and milk in alternation.

Then the clams and butter melted, salt and black pepper.

Lastly the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Drop in boiling lard and fry a nice brown.

Measure with a coffee cup.

TO COOK CODFISH

Two pounds of codfish, Two pounds of mashed potatoes, Four large boiled onions, One dozen hard-boiled eggs, Half a pound of pickled pork, One tablespoon of mixed mustard.

Soak the fish all night and wash it off in the morning.

Put it on in cold water to simmer for about a half or three quarters of an hour, as it must be very tender.

Pick to pieces, chop the onions very fine and mix with the potatoes, cut the pork in thin slices, fry until the grease is out.

Take pieces out and mix the grease slowly with the potato and codfish, adding the spoonful of mixed mustard.

Lastly, chop the eggs and add.

Shape as an omelette and fry in butter until well browned.

Serve with a rich drawn butter with hard-boiled eggs chopped in it and three tablespoons of Worcestershire sauce beaten in while boiling.

CODFISH BALLS

One pound of codfish, One pound and a half of mashed potato, One cooking-spoonful of butter, The yolks of two raw eggs.

Skin the fish, take out the bones, weigh and soak overnight.

In the morning change the water and over it enough hot water to cover

Let it stand on the range where it will keep warm for about ten minutes, then change the water again and let it boil ten minutes.

Pick and chop the fish very fine, mash the potatoes while hot and mix with the fish.

Add the butter and yolks of the eggs, into which you have previously stirred half a teaspoon of mixed mustard.

Make into small round cakes or balls and fry a nice brown, in lard and butter mixed.

TO SELECT CRABS

Select the thickest and heaviest crabs, which are generally considered the best, though the medium-sized are the most delicate.

When perfectly fresh, the shell should be a bright red and the joints of the legs stiff.

Boil them as you would lobsters, only boil them longer.

ANOTHER RECIPE FOR CRABS

Two dozen crabs, Three pints of rich milk, Three shallow tablespoons of flour, A salt-spoonful of curry powder, Worcestershire sauce, Salt and pepper to the taste, Six ounces of butter.

Boil the crabs twenty-five minutes, pour off the water and when cool enough, pick the meat carefully from the shell.

Let the milk boil slowly, mix the butter and flour together until perfectly smooth, put it in the boiling milk and stir gently to prevent burning, for five or ten minutes.

Season to the taste with the Worcestershire sauce, salt, cayenne and black pepper and the curry powder.

This dressing must be made the consistency of thick cream.

Put the crab meat into a bowl, mix the dressing with it, a little at a time, until it is all mixed.

Chop the parsley very fine, sprinkle it in the bowl and stir all together.

Wipe each shell with a piece of onion, fill them with the mixture and put breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter over each shell and bake for about fifteen minutes.

TO FRY SOFT-SHELL CRABS

Six soft shell crabs, One teacup full of milk, One teaspoon of flour, One egg, Salt and pepper.

The crabs must be perfectly fresh.

Wipe them dry; sprinkle over them a little salt and pepper.

Beat the egg and milk together.

Roll the crabs, first in the flour, then in the egg and milk and fry in boiling lard until well browned. Or sprinkle them with salt and pepper and roll them in cracker powder, then drop them in boiling lard and fry as you would croquettes.

FRICASSEE OF SOFT-SHELL CRABS

Six large, fat crabs, Two tablespoons of chopped onion, Two teaspoons of chopped parsley, Two tablespoons of butter, One cooking-spoonful of browned flour.

Put the butter and onion into a pan and stir until the onion is soft and well browned.

Then add the browned flour and parsley, stir for two or three minutes and pour on a quart of boiling water.

Wash the crabs and chop off the claws while they are alive; put them into the gravy and let them simmer for half an hour. Then put them on a dish and pour the gravy over them.

Serve with nicely boiled rice. They should be alive when put into the gravy to cook.

CRAB GUMBO SOUP

One knuckle of veal, Three good-sized onions, A quarter of a peck of okra, Six large crabs, Two gallons of boiling water, Two tablespoons of butter. Salt and pepper to the taste.

Cut up the onions, slice the okra and fry them in butter with pepper and salt.

When browned, put all into a pot with the boiling water and when half cooked, divide the crabs, fry them in butter and stir them in.

Let this simmer for five hours; then it will be done.

If wanted in the winter use the canned okra, one quart and three pints of oysters in the place of the crabs. Serve quickly.

TO DEVIL CRABS

One dozen crabs, Inside of a baker’s loaf of bread, Yolks of four hard-boiled eggs, Parsley and Worcestershire to the taste. Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, A quarter of a pound of butter.

Boil the crabs twenty minutes, then dissect.

Chop the parsley very fine, mash the eggs smooth and mix all with the meat, sauce, salt and cayenne pepper.

Wash the shells, fill and dip each one in egg, roll in pounded crackers and fry a nice brown.

CREAM FISH

Six pounds of fish, One small white onion, One teaspoon of summer savory, One quart of sweet milk, A quarter of a pound of flour, One tablespoon of butter.

Boil the fish until done, then bone it.

Tie in a thin bag, the summer savory and chopped onion.

Boil one quart of milk, season with salt and pepper, put the bag in and let the milk boil eight minutes, then take it out.

Put the flour and butter together, stir in the milk and boil three minutes.

Now arrange in a baking dish a layer of fish, a little salt, then another layer of fish and some salt.

Pour the milk over, cover the top with breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter and bake until a nice brown.

Cream will be delicious if convenient.

A NICE WAY TO FRY FILLETS OF FISH

The juice of four lemons, One tablespoon of chopped parsley, Half a teacup full of salad oil, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Place some nice fillets of any kind of fish in a crock; mix the above ingredients well and pour over the fillets.

Turn them over now and then and when wanted, drain, wipe well, dip each piece in flour and fry in boiling lard a nice brown.

Serve with any kind of fish sauce.

If this should be prepared in summer, keep the crock in the ice chest and only prepare a small quantity at the time.

TO FRY FISH.

A five pound fish, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste, Three eggs.

Take a five-pound fish and skin it with a very sharp knife.

Take out the bones and cut in pieces about three inches square.

Beat the eggs, season to the taste, with salt and cayenne pepper and a little black pepper.

Dip each piece of fish in the eggs; and fry a nice brown.

HOW TO SERVE IT

Put potato croquettes in the center of the dish and arrange the squares of the fish around them.

Garnish the dish with thin slices of lemon and small sprigs of parsley.

Serve with tartare sauce, in a gravy boat.

This makes a delicious dish for breakfast, or luncheon.

FISH IN SHELLS

One white fish weighing three pounds, One pint of sweet thick cream, One cooking- spoonful of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Extract of celery, Salt and pepper.

Let the fish boil for twenty minutes, then skin and bone it and pick it very fine.

Put the cream into a saucepan; rub the butter and flour together, then stir into the cream until it thickens.

Add extract of celery, salt and pepper to the taste and mix with the fish.

Fill the shells, put on the top of each some stale breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter and put them in the oven for about ten minutes.

TO FRY FROGS

As much cracker crumbs as will be needed, Two eggs, salt and pepper to taste, One teacup full of milk.

First boil them in salt and water for about three minutes; take them out and wipe well; beat the eggs and stir in the milk, adding salt and pepper to the taste.

Dip each frog, first in the egg, then in the cracker crumbs.

When they have all been dipped, put them carefully into a wire frying basket.

Put it into a skillet of boiling lard; let them fry a nice brown and serve at once.

LOBSTER BALLS

One large hen lobster, One pint of breadcrumbs, Curry powder, salt and cayenne to the taste, Two eggs.

Parboil the lobster, allowing ten minutes to the pound.

Take out the meat and coral and pound well in a mortar, mix with it the breadcrumbs, curry, salt and cayenne pepper and the two eggs.

Shape into balls the size of a small potato; roll in breadcrumbs, fry a nice brown in hot lard and serve on a napkin.

BAKED LOBSTER or SALMON

A two-pound can of salmon or lobster, Yolks of four hard-boiled eggs, A teaspoon of curry powder, Two tablespoons of butter, One teaspoon of flour, One pint of milk, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste.

First make a thick drawn butter of the milk, butter and flour. If one teaspoon of flour should not make it quite thick, add a little more.

Pick out all of the bones from the salmon and skin.

Mash the hard boiled eggs very smooth and mix with the drawn butter.

Then add the fish, salt, cayenne pepper and a small teaspoon of curry powder.

Put into a dish, sprinkle over it cracker powder enough to cover well and a few pieces of butter.

Bake twenty minutes.

This is delicious for supper or is very pretty served in shells for luncheon. Either California, or Kennebec salmon will answer.

LOBSTER CHOPS

A three-pound lobster, Two teaspoons of chopped parsley, One teaspoon of chopped onion, A quarter of a pound of butter, One heaping tablespoon of flour, One large teacup full of rich cream, One tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce, Two raw eggs.

Take out the lobster, put into boiling water and let it boil for about twenty-five minutes.

When cool, select the meat from the shell and chop it very fine.

Mix the parsley and onion with the meat and season to the taste.

Put the butter into the frying-pan and when melted, stir in the flour until it is slightly browned.

Add the cream, or rich milk and the two well-beaten eggs.

Stir gently over the fire until smooth and the consistency of rich cream.

Season to the taste with salt and put in the “Worcestershire sauce; then add the lobster.

Let this come to a slow boil and stir gently for three minutes.

Pour on a dish and when cold, shape as chops and stick in the claw to represent the bone.

Dip them in raw egg, then in breadcrumbs; put them into a deep pan and fry in boiling lard until a delicate brown.

Serve with a sauce.

Don’t put the claws into the chops until they have been rolled in the breadcrumbs.

SAUCE FOR LOBSTER CHOPS

One pint of rich cream, A piece of onion the size of a nutmeg, A tablespoon of butter, A dessertspoonful of flour, A teaspoon of Worcestershire sauce, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Put the cream into a saucepan with the piece of onion and when it comes to a boil, add the butter and flour.

Rub until perfectly smooth and stir slowly for five minutes.

Take out the onion, put in the Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper; then serve very hot with the chops.

A FRICASSE OF LOBSTER

Two large lobsters, One pint of cream, The juice of one lemon, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Parboil the lobsters, allowing ten minutes to the pound.

Take out all of the meat and the coral; cut the meat into small pieces and with the coral, put into a saucepan and pour on the cream.

Cover and let it stew gently for the same time it took to cook the lobster then add the lemon juice and curry powder to the taste.

Simmer for five minutes and serve very hot.

LOBSTER SOUP

Two pounds of fresh lobster, or one can of preserved, weighing two pounds, One quart of milk, One quart of boiling water, Two tablespoons of corn starch, One teaspoon and a half of salt, Two tablespoons of butter, Mace and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put the milk in a saucepan, with hot water underneath.

When it comes to a boil, stir in the corn starch, previously dissolved in a little cold water.

In the meantime, cut the lobster in very small pieces.

Put it in the pint of water with the seasoning and butter and boil until the lobster is done.

Strain and pour into the thickened milk.

Pound the coral very fine and add to the soup, which will give it a pretty pink color.

A NICE WAY OF PREPARING OYSTERS

One hundred oysters, Two teacups of oyster liquor, One teacup full of cream, Two tablespoon of flour, Three tablespoons of butter, Salt and black pepper to taste.

Drain the oysters well, take two teacups of the liquor, boil it and skim for five minutes; then put in the oysters and let them boil up once and then take them out of the liquor.

Cream the flour and butter together and stir into the liquor until it thickens.

Put back the oysters and let them come to another boil and just before taking them up add the cream, salt and pepper.

TO BROIL OYSTERS

Four dozen large oysters, A quarter pound of butter, Salt and black pepper

Drain and wipe the oysters.

Place them carefully on the wire broiler, have the butter, salt and pepper, in a saucepan with hot water underneath.

Broil the oysters before the fire, turning the broiler to have them nicely browned; and as you broil them, put them in the butter, until all are broiled and serve quickly in a heated dish.

TO FEED OYSTERS IN THE SHELL

Wash them clean, lay the bottom downwards and pour over them salt and water, allowing six ounces of salt, one quart of corn or oatmeal to each gallon of water.

Mix well and sprinkle over the oysters. Do this every other day and keep them in a cellar.

OYSTER CROQUETTES

One hundred large oysters, A small teaspoon of chopped onion. Twelve sprigs of parsley, Half a pound of butter, Two tablespoons of flour, One pint of rich cream.

Put the oysters into a saucepan, over a moderate fire and let them cook slowly until the leaves are well opened, then drain well through a colander.

Take out the muscles and chop the oysters, but don’t chop them too fine.

Season to the taste with salt, black and cayenne pepper.

Chop the onion and parsley very fine and mix well with the oysters.

Put the butter into a large frying pan; add the flour and rub with a spoon until perfectly smooth; then add slowly the cream, stirring over a brisk fire until it becomes a smooth paste.

If this should be too thick, add a little more cream, or some of the juice strained from the oysters; for the paste must be the consistency of thick custard.

Put the oysters into the paste and let all cook over a slow fire for ten minutes; stirring gently every minute or two.

Now spread the mixture on a dish and let it get cold.

Shape the croquettes, roll in stale breadcrumbs and egg and put them in a frying basket. Fry to a nice brown in hot lard.

Should the mixture be too soft to shape the croquettes, take out a spoonful at the time, roll first in breadcrumbs, then in egg and again in crumbs and let them stand awhile before putting them in the frying basket.

Should the weather be at all warm, it would be well to put the mixture in the ice chest for an hour or two before shaping them.

TO PICKLE OYSTERS

One quart of vinegar, One gallon of oysters, One pint of sherry wine, Two quarts of oyster liquor, Half an ounce of ground cloves, Half an ounce of ground allspice, Half an ounce of ground mace, Six small red pepper pods, One dessertspoonful of salt, Two lemons.

Put the oysters into a porcelain kettle with their liquor and let them simmer slowly until the edges curl.

When done take them out of their liquor, drop them in cold water and let them remain in it ten minutes, then drain.

Take two quarts of the liquor, the vinegar, spices, salt and pepper pods; let this boil for about three minutes.

Pour into a bowl to get cold. Cut the lemons into thin slices, taking care to throw away all of the seeds. Put them with the wine into the mixture, then put the oysters into wide-mouth bottles and pour it over.

Cork tightly.

PICKLED OYSTERS II

Three hundred large oysters, One pint of Madeira wine, One quart of vinegar, Four teaspoons of salt, Four tablespoons of whole black pepper, Eight blades of mace.

Strain the liquor off the oysters, boil and pour it over them while hot.

Let them stand for about ten minutes, pour off the liquor and cover the oysters.

Put the wine, vinegar, pepper, mace and salt, in the liquor and boil again for about ten minutes.

Put the oysters in close jars and when the liquor is cold pour it over them.

Cover the jars tightly and the oysters will keep a long time.

OYSTER CATSUP

Four pints of fresh oysters, One heaping teaspoon of ground mace, Half a teaspoon of cayenne pepper, Four ounces of salt, Three pints of white wine, Half a tumblerful of brandy.

Wash the oysters in their own liquor, then put them into a marble mortar, with the mace, salt and cayenne pepper and pound all well together.

Now put the mixture into a saucepan with the wine and let it boil ten minutes.

Rub through a sieve, boil five minutes longer, skim well and when cold, add the brandy; bottle, cork and seal tightly.

This gives a fine flavor to meat sauces and will keep for some time.

TO FRY OYSTERS

The oysters should always be handled with a spoon, a flat spoon is preferable.

Some prefer olive oil to lard, but pure sweet lard is the best.

Drain the oysters thoroughly in a colander, then roll them in cracker powder, not using any meal or flour.

Let the oyster be rolled gently with the hand until it will not receive any more of the powder.

Have the very best lard and when it has come to a good boil in the frying pan and is in sufficient quantity to entirely cover the oysters.

Put them in with the spoon and cook them until a nice brown.

Serve immediately.

ANOTHER WAY TO FRY OYSTERS

Drain the oysters in a colander, then lay them between soft towels to dry.

Beat up some eggs, according to the quantity of oysters you intend frying, first roll the oyster gently in the egg, then in the cracker powder and put them on a board to dry for about half an hour.

Heat the skillet well, put in a little lard and a few oysters at the time, turning them carefully, as you would cakes, until they are a nice cinnamon brown.

Serve immediately.

TO GRIDDLE OYSTERS

Select the largest and finest oysters, drain the liquor from them.

Have the griddle hot and butter it well.

Lay the oysters on it in single layers and when browned on one side, turn on the other, to brown too.

While they are cooking, a small piece of butter maybe added, this, combined with the juice given out by the oyster, forms a brown skin.

When done to a nice brown, remove both oysters and skin with a tin cake turner.

Put them on a hot dish, pour over them some plain melted butter, seasoned with a little black and cayenne pepper.

OYSTER GUMBO

One large chicken, One can of oysters, Half a pound of boiled ham, Two quarts of boiling water, One bunch of summer savory, One bunch of parsley, One tablespoon of filee* powder, Salt, black and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Divide the chicken, skin and flour each piece well; cut the ham in dice and, with a cooking-spoonful of butter, fry until brown.

Then pour on it two quarts of boiling water, the bunches of summer savory and parsley tied together, salt and cayenne pepper.

Let this boil slowly for four hours.

Take out the summer savory and parsley, pull the chicken to pieces, return it to the pot.

About fifteen minutes before serving, heat the oysters and their liquor and add to the soup.

While they are simmering very slowly, take out a teacup full of the soup and mix with the filee powder.

When perfectly smooth put it in the soup; let it boil up once and it will be done.

Pour into a heated tureen and serve with some nicely boiled rice in another dish.

*Filee, now called file. A sassafras herb commonly found in gumbo spice mixtures.

OYSTER PATTIES

Prepare the oysters as in the recipe for scalloped oysters No. 2.

Make the patties of puff paste; bake them until the pastry begins to brown and when done, put three oysters in each pattie, with a little of the sauce.

SCALLOPED OYSTERS

One quart of large oysters, One coffee cup full of breadcrumbs, A quarter of a pound of butter, Mace, salt and pepper to the taste.

Drain and dry the oysters well.

First put in a layer of oysters, then a little mace, salt and pepper and breadcrumbs, on top of the crumbs, arrange nicely some small pieces of butter.

Then another layer of oysters and so on, until the dish is filled, having the last layer of breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter.

Bake in a moderate oven about twenty minutes.

SCALLOPED OYSTERS II

One quart of oysters, One pint of cream or rich milk, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One dessertspoonful of cornstarch, Mace, salt and pepper to the taste.

Put on the milk or cream and when it comes to a boil, season to the taste.

Put in the cornstarch and butter and stir in until it thickens.

Add the oysters; and when they curl, pour them into a baking dish, sprinkle breadcrumbs on top and cut up some small pieces of butter with them.

Bake ten minutes.

If not thick enough before pouring in the dish, add a teaspoon more of cornstarch.

The cream after it is cooked, should be the consistency of boiled custard.

These will be very nice baked in shells.

TO STEW OYSTERS

One can of oysters, One pint of cream, Half a pound of butter, A dessertspoonful of flour, Black pepper and salt, to the taste.

Put the oysters, with their liquor, into a saucepan, on the fire.

Heat, but do not boil.

Pour off the liquor into another saucepan and, as soon as it boils, add the butter, pepper and salt.

Put into the cream, the flour and then stir it into the liquor until it thickens.

While it is boiling, add the oysters and let them remain on the fire for about three minutes, then serve.

Should crackers be preferred to flour, roll some very fine and put in a dessertspoonful and a half.

Milk can be used, if cream is not to be had, but the latter is much more delicious.

OYSTER SOUP

One quart of oysters, One quart of cream or rich milk, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One tablespoon of corn starch, Mace, salt and white pepper to the taste.

Strain the liquor from the oysters and pick off any pieces of shell remaining on them.

If cream is not to be had, use milk and two cooking spoonfuls of butter.

Put the milk into one saucepan and the liquor into another.

Let each boil and skim the liquor while boiling.

After the has boiled about five minutes stir in the liquor.

Season with the mace, salt and pepper to the taste.

Put the corn starch and butter together and stir in the milk and liquor until the consistency of thick cream.

Lastly, put in the oysters; stir them gently and when the leaves curl, they will be cooked enough.

If crackers are preferred to corn starch, use two tablespoons of cracker powder.

Some do not like mace, in that case leave it out.

VEGETABLE OYSTER SOUP

Three bunches of salsify*, Two tablespoons of butter, Two tablespoons of flour, One quart of rich milk, Two pounded crackers, A piece of codfish the size of a cent.

Scrape the salsify and cut it up fine; boil it three hours in four quarts of water; put the codfish in and boil an hour; boil the other ingredients half an hour.

Rub the flour and butter together very smooth, stir in, add the crackers and serve.

*Salsify is like a parsnip, but skinnier

POTATO SOUP

Eight large potatoes, One small onion, One tablespoon of chopped parsley, Two quarts of stock, Salt to the taste.

Slice the potatoes and onion and put them into a saucepan with a cooking-spoonful of butter.

Stir until nicely colored, then put in the soup and chopped parsley.

Boil until the potatoes are perfectly soft.

Put through a colander, return to the fire, add the salt and a little black pepper, boil five minutes.

Just before taking off the fire stir in the well-beaten yolks of three eggs.

Don’t let the soup boil after adding the eggs but stir for a minute so as to mix well.

TO BOIL PIKE

One pike, Twelve medium-sized oysters, Half a pint of breadcrumbs, One saltspoonful of summer savory, One dessertspoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste, Two eggs.

Take out the gills and wash thoroughly.

Chop the oysters, mix with them the breadcrumbs, butter, yolks of the eggs, summer savory, a teaspoon of grated lemon peel, salt and black pepper.

Stuff the fish with this, sew it up, then wrap it in a cloth and put it into a fish kettle of boiling water, adding two tablespoons of vinegar to the water and a dessertspoonful of salt.

If the fish is of medium size, it will be done in half an hour; if a large one, it will take an hour.

Garnish the fish alternately with thin slices of lemon and small sprigs of parsley and serve with egg sauce.

RED SNAPPER

One nice fresh red snapper, The juice of three lemons, Salt and black pepper.

Wash the fish, clean and wipe dry, then rub the lemon juice in it and sprinkle over that some salt and black pepper.

Put into a cloth, then into a fish kettle; cover it with hot water and add a tablespoon of salt.

Let it boil gently, skimming carefully while boiling.

If it is a large fish, boil three-quarters of an hour, if a medium size, half an hour will do.

If lemons are not to be had, a half pint of vinegar put in the water, when the fish is put on to boil, will do.

This rule can be observed with all fish to be boiled.

Have the dish hot and garnish the fish with sprigs of parsley and thin slices of lemon.

Serve with either a hot or cold sauce.

SALMON CROQUETTES

One pound of cooked salmon, One pound of mashed potatoes, Half a teaspoon of curry powder, Two tablespoons of butter, Two tablespoons of cream, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste.

Take all of the bones out of the salmon and skin.

Chop very fine and mix all well together. If too stiff, add a little more cream.

Shape as croquettes and fry quickly in boiling lard.

TO BAKE SHAD

One large shad, One pint of breadcrumbs, One teaspoon of chopped parsley, Half a teaspoon of powdered summer savory, One tablespoon of butter, The yolk of one raw egg, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Clean the fish nicely and if it be a male remove the back bone, if a female remove the roe.

Make a stuffing of the above ingredients and put it into the cavities made by removing the backbone or roe; put some egg and fine breadcrumbs on top of the fish and lay it full length in a pan, with about a pint of hot water.

Baste well and let it bake gently for about an hour.

Boil the roe and garnish the dish alternately with slices of it, small sprigs of parsley and thin slices of lemon.This can be eaten without sauce, or with a tartare sauce.

TO FRY SMELTS

Seven smelts, One teacup full of breadcrumbs, One tablespoon of butter, The yolks of two eggs.

Do not wash the smelts any more than is necessary.

Cut off the fins, wipe them with a towel and sprinkle a little flour over each one.

Melt the butter and beat it in the eggs.

Dip each smelt into the eggs, then into the breadcrumbs and drop them in boiling lard.

Let them fry gently until a light brown and when done, dish them up on a napkin and serve with tartare sauce.

TO BROIL SPANISH MACKEREL

One Spanish mackerel, The juice of one lemon, Butter, pepper and salt.

Split the mackerel down the back, rub it over with a little salad oil; then sprinkle it with a little black pepper and salt.

Put it on the gridiron before a good fire and brown both sides nicely.

When done, squeeze the lemon juice on it and garnish tastefully with sprigs of parsley.

Serve as it is, or with a tartare sauce.

TO CAN TERRAPINS

Terrapins can be canned as tomatoes or peaches.

Parboil them and seal very hot.

As they are so delicate, it would be better to put them up in glass jars.

A little salt, cayenne and black pepper should be put in while boiling.

FOR COOKING AND DRESSING TERRAPINS

Place the terrapin in boiling water for five minutes; then take it out, throw that water away and put on fresh water to boil.

Remove the outside skin, which is on the legs and flesh between the upper and lower shells. This can be easily done at this stage by rubbing with a towel.

Put the terrapin back into the boiling water and cook until it is done, which will take from three-quarters of an hour to an hour and a quarter, according to the size and toughness of the terrapin.

When the joints of the leg break under a slight pressure it has boiled enough.

To Open: Place it on its back with the head from you.

The gall bladder is then in the left-hand liver. This must be removed very carefully.

The other liver and all that part which is not too close to the gall should be cut up and put in.

The only other part which cannot be used is the sand-bag.

If the pipes are used, they should be chopped almost to a hash and will serve as thickening.

Be sure to leave out the nails and bones of the head.

The eggs should have the slight film which surrounds them pulled off and then put them in cold water for a short time.

TO DRESS THE TERRAPIN

The yolks of three hard boiled eggs, A quarter of a pound of butter, Half a teacup full of sherry or Madeira wine, One teacup full of sweet cream.

Mash the eggs and add the butter; but if they do not mix nicely, a little heat can be applied.

Put a saucepan on the fire and put in some terrapin, then a little cream dressing and so on, until it is thoroughly heated and the dressing is all dissolved.

Then stir in the eggs, wine, cayenne pepper, black pepper and salt to the taste.

This will be enough for one large terrapin, or three small ones.

ANOTHER DRESSING FOR TERRAPINS

One pint of clear soup, A quarter of a pound of butter, A teacup full of sherry wine, Yolks of four hard-boiled eggs, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Let the soup come to a boil, mash the yolks of the hard-boiled eggs until perfectly smooth and with the butter stir in, then the salt and cayenne pepper.

Boil for five minutes; and just before taking it off the fire, heat the wine, put it in the dressing and pour over the terrapin while boiling hot.

This will do for two good sized terrapins.

Garnish the dish with thin slices of lemon, leaving out the seeds.

DRESSING FOR ONE TERRAPIN

A quarter of a pound of butter, One teacup full of cream, Three tablespoons of Madeira wine, Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Let the cream come to a boil, add the butter.

Mash the hard-boiled yolks until perfectly smooth and stir in.

Lastly, put in the salt and cayenne pepper.

Boil for five minutes, pour in the wine and while boiling hot, pour over the terrapin.

The terrapin should always be heated first.

TO DRESS A TERRAPIN II

One pint of the water the terrapin was boiled in, One quarter of a pound of butter, One wineglass and a half of Madeira wine, One saltspoonful of salt, One teaspoon of browned flour, Cayenne pepper to the taste.

Mix the flour and butter together, add three tablespoons of the terrapin liquor, let this simmer for a few minutes and add the rest of the liquor.

Put in the terrapin while boiling, color with a teaspoon of burnt brown sugar.

Put in the salt and pepper and just before serving add the wine.

This should be prepared in a saucepan, with hot water underneath.

One terrapin is enough for four persons.

Garnish the dish with thin slices of lemon.

TERRAPIN DRESSING III

One good sized terrapin, One teaspoon of made mustard, Half a tumblerful of sweet cream, A large wineglassful of sherry wine, The yolks of two hard boiled eggs, The eighth of a pound of butter.

Put the terrapin on in a saucepan with hot water underneath and let it steam.

Heat the cream and butter and stir in the terrapin with the mustard and hard-boiled eggs rubbed very fine.

Let this boil for about five minutes, put salt and cayenne pepper to the taste and just before serving, heat the wine and pour in.

Serve very hot, with the dish garnished with thin slices of lemon. Take out the seeds.

EGG BALLS FOR TERRAPINS

Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, The white of one raw egg, A saltspoonful of butter, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Mash the yolks smoothly with the butter, then add the white of the egg.

Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

After mixing thoroughly, take bits of the mixture and soil the size of terrapin’s eggs; then roll in flour and fry carefully in butter, but don’t let them change color in frying.

If wanted for turtle soup, shape the eggs as large as a medium-sized marble.

BEEF AND ENTREES,

OBSERVATIONS ON ROASTING, BOILING AND FRYING

Also Directions for Choosing Meat

When roasting, let the piece lie in water one hour, then wash it, wipe perfectly dry and put it in the oven, or on the spit.

Put on it two thin slices of pickled pork and put two inches of water in the pan; pepper and salt it.

After the meat is about half cooked and before it begins to look brown, cover it with white paper and baste on it.

When it is nearly done, take off the paper, dredge with flour, baste frequently to raise a froth, then serve.

When mutton is roasted, after you take off the paper, loosen the skin and take it off carefully, then dredge and froth it up.

Mutton, veal, lamb and pork, must be well roasted, but beef must be rare.

The two last must be skinned in the manner directed for mutton.

Beef may look brown, but the whiter the other meats are, the more genteel are they and if properly roasted, they may be perfectly done and quite white.

Whatever meat is to be boiled, must be put into cold water, with a little salt, which will cook it regularly.

When the meat is put into boiling water, the outside is cooked too much before the inside gets heated.

Dredge everything with flour and be sure to add salt to the water.

Good beef, when fresh, has a fine grain and is of a vermilion color, with a slight tint of purple on the cut surface; it is firm and tender to the touch and is so elastic, that no mark is left after pressure from the finger.

The fat is white and firm. When beef is lean, coarse and sinewy looking, it is old and tough.

When hams are cooked, they should instantly be thrown into cold water, as the change from the boiling water they were cooked in, to the cold water, instantly loosens the skin from the flesh and it peels off without trouble.

In choosing mutton or veal when fresh, the quality may be determined from the fat inside the thigh.

If there be a plenty of clear, firm fat, the meat is good.

Veal should be six weeks old before it is killed, else it will be unwholesome.

Too young veal, may be detected by a bluish tint.

Fish and all other articles for frying, after being nicely prepared, should be laid on a board and dredged with flour or meal, mixed with salt.

When it becomes dry on one side, turn it and dredge it on the other.

For broiling, have very bright, clear coals.

If wild fowls, poultry or birds, pepper and salt well before broiling.

If beef steak or mutton chops, only pepper at first and do not salt until pressing them; then have butter, salt and more pepper in a pan for that.

To have viands served in perfection, the dishes should always be well heated.

There should always be a supply of browned flour kept in readiness to thicken brown gravies, which must be prepared in the following manner: Put a pint of flour in a pan, which place in a hot oven and stir until it is uniformly browned.

ASPEC JELLY

Three pints of clear soup, One box of Cox’s gelatin, Half a pint of wine, One tablespoon of vinegar, Whites and shells of three eggs, Six whole cloves, Salt to the taste, One Lemon.

Put the soup in a saucepan with the wine, gelatin, vinegar, cloves, rind and juice of a lemon, salt and egg shells.

Lastly, stir in the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Boil twenty minutes, let it settle for five minutes and strain through a jelly bag.

HOW TO MOLD ASPEC JELLY

Put the mold on ice, pour in until about one-third full, let the jelly get stiff.

Then cut some thin slices of cooked sweetbreads, champignons and truffles, which place tastefully on the jelly, with some cooked peas here and there.

Pour on some more jelly, let it get stiff, put some more champignons, etc. and so on, until the mold is full. This is a delightful dish to be served as a course at a dinner, lunch, or supper.

BEEF BOUILLI

Five pounds of the round of the beef, Three medium-sized onions, Four large carrots, A teaspoon of black pepper grains, A small pod of red pepper, A teaspoon of celery seed, A teaspoon of powdered summer savory, Three turnips.

Put the beef on the fire with water enough to cover it and a dessertspoonful of salt.

When it boils, remove and set it back to simmer slowly.

Peel and chop the onions; cut the carrots and turnips in dice and put them in with the beef.

Tie the parsley, pepper grains, red pepper pod and celery seed, in a muslin bag and put it in the beef.

Sprinkle the summer savory over all and boil slowly three hours.

Take it off and a few minutes before dishing, beat up an egg, spread it on top, sprinkle with breadcrumbs and brown in the oven.

TO CORN BEEF

Four gallons of water, Five pounds of salt, Two ounces of saltpeter, One pound and a half of brown sugar.

Mix the above and boil fifteen minutes, being careful to take off the scum as it rises.

Let it stand until cold, then having packed the meat you wish to corn in a vessel, pour the pickle on it, taking care to have the meat well covered with it.

Before putting the pickle on the beef, it will be better to rub it well with salt and saltpeter and let it stand three days.

Let the beef remain a week in the pickle.

This pickle will also be excellent for tongues.

TO BOIL CORN BEEF

One piece of corn beef, Six whole cloves, Six whole allspice.

Soak it for about half an hour in cold water, then pour off that water and cover it with fresh cold water.

When it comes to a boil, set it back on the range, put in the cloves and allspice and if to be eaten hot, add two good-sized carrots; let it simmer steadily for four or five hours, according to size; skimming frequently.

When thoroughly done, put it in a vessel rather small for it; put a plate on top and a heavy flat iron on top of that, leaving it so until the next day

If it is to be eaten hot, garnish the dish with the carrots, cut in dice, or some nicely boiled cabbage.

CROQUETTES

Half a pound of the breast of chicken or turkey, Half a pound of sweetbreads, Half a pound of breadcrumbs, Half a pound of butter, Three teaspoons of chopped parsley, One teaspoon of grated onion, Four eggs, Nutmeg, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put the breadcrumbs into a saucepan and pour over them hot water enough to mash perfectly smooth.

Add the yolks of two eggs, stir over the fire until a moderately stiff panada is made and set aside to cool.

Chop the meat and sweetbreads as fine as possible, add the panada, butter, parsley, salt and cayenne pepper.

When thoroughly mixed, add the other two eggs, both whites and yolks and shape as pears.

Break into a pan two more eggs and have ready some stale breadcrumbs.

Roll each croquette in the egg, then in the crumbs and let them stand for a while to dry.

Drop in boiling lard and fry a cinnamon brown.

Be sure to cook the sweetbreads before chopping and if they are not to be had, substitute for them four tablespoons of rich cream.

The more creamy the croquettes are, the more delicious they will be.

CROQUETTES II

One set of sweetbreads, Half a teacup full of chopped turkey breast, Two-thirds of a pint of boiling cream, One small teacup full of stale breadcrumbs, One small onion, A dessertspoonful of chopped celery, A quarter of a pound of butter, One teaspoon of chopped parsley, Salt, cayenne pepper and nutmeg to taste.

Pour the boiling cream over the breadcrumbs and mash smooth.

Parboil the sweetbreads and chop very fine; grate the onion and mix all well together with the hands and shape as pears; roll in egg, then in stale breadcrumbs, drop in boiling lard and fry a cinnamon brown.

TO COOK A FILLET OF BEEF

Three pounds of the fillet, Half a pint of clear soup, Salt and black pepper.

Put the fillet into a pan, sprinkle some salt and black pepper over it.

Heat the clear soup and pour over the fillet.

Have a good oven, baste well for three quarters of an hour and serve either with a tomato sauce or champignon sauce.

BEEF WITH PARSLEY

Seven pounds of beef, Two large bunches of parsley, Three small slices of pickled pork.

Put the beef in a pot with water enough to cover it.

Boil slowly for about four hours.

Take out the beef, dredge it with flour and put it into an oven to brown.

Take a pint and a half of the water the beef was boiled in, stir in a teaspoon of white flour and the same of brown flour; stir this until it thickens, garnish the beef with some thin slices of pickle, pour some of the gravy over it and put the rest in a dish. Serve very hot.

ROAST RIBS OF BEEF

A roast of two or three ribs, Some flour for dredging, Salt and black pepper.

Put the beef into a pan, season with pepper and salt and pour in the pan a pint of hot water to baste with.

Keep the oven well heated and closed until it begins to roast, then baste well every fifteen minutes.

Add more hot water as it begins to simmer away, so as the gravy will not burn.

Allow about fifteen minutes to the pound and half an hour before it is done, dredge well with flour and baste often, so as to brown nicely.

Take the meat up, dredge in more flour and add seasoning and boiling water, but don’t let the gravy be too thin.

Let it boil up once and strain into a gravy boat.

BEEF ROLL

Two pounds of lean beef, One pound of fat bacon, One lemon, A teaspoon of chopped parsley, A teaspoon of chopped onion, Nutmeg and salt to taste, Two eggs.

Chop the beef and bacon very fine; season with nutmeg, salt and a little pepper.

Add the onion, parsley, grated rind of the lemon and the juice of one half of it.

Then the eggs and mix well together with the hand.

Shape into a roll, surround the roll with buttered paper and tie a cord securely around it.

Then cover it with a paste made of flour and water and bake two hours. Remove the paper and crust and serve with a tomato sauce or brown gravy.

A KENTUCKY RECIPE FOR CURING HAMS

Some red and black pepper, Some saltpeter and brown sugar.

Make a strong red pepper tea of the pods, moisten the salt with it and add some brown sugar, allowing about a quarter of a pound to each ham; mix all well together and rub the hams thoroughly with it.

Put a teaspoon of saltpeter on the fleshy side of each ham; let them stand in the salt three weeks, then smoke with green hickory or red oak until a good color.

Canvas them by mixing red and black peppers together; about three- fourths black pepper.

Wrap in paper, put them in cotton bags and hang in a cool, dry place.

TO BOIL A HAM

One ham, One pint of vinegar, Enough water to cover well.

If the ham is one year old, soak it overnight.

If two years old, soak a day and a night. If three years old soak two days and two nights.

Wash well and put it on in cold water, having the water at least four inches above the ham.

If small, let it simmer six or seven hours. If large, it will require at least nine hours simmering and never let it boil hard.

After it has been on the fire three hours, pour off the water and add fresh boiling water with the pint of vinegar.

Skin while the ham is warm

TO BAKE A HAM

Half a teaspoon of mixed mustard, The yolks of two eggs, Some grated breadcrumbs.

After the ham has been well boiled and skinned, before allowing it to get cold, mix the mustard with the yolks of the eggs and spread nicely over the ham, then sprinkle the breadcrumbs over, put it in the oven and bake half an hour.

It is a great improvement to pour over the ham half a tumblerful of sherry or port wine, just about ten minutes before taking it out of the oven.

LAMB

The best pieces of lamb for roasting, are the forequarter and hindquarter.

If preferred rare, allow fifteen minutes to the pound.

If preferred well done, allow twenty minutes to the pound and serve either with a mint sauce or brown gravy and jelly.

BOILED MARROW BONES

Some marrow bones, Some nicely cut squares of toast.

Saw the bones according to fancy, make a little paste of flour and water and cover the ends with it, so as the marrow will not come out in boiling.

Put them into a kettle and cover them with boiling water.

Cook for two hours and if served without taking the marrow out, take the paste off; wrap each end with white fringed paper and arrange nicely on the dish.

In this case, the bones ought to be four inches long.

If served with the toast, have the squares nicely cut, buttered while hot and spread the marrow on the squares.

MUTTON

The best pieces of mutton for roasting, are the saddle, the leg and shoulder.

It improves mutton to let it hang, but it is a great mistake to allow it to hang too long.

In the summer, if surrounded by ice, it can hang a week.

In the winter, three weeks at the utmost.

If allowed to hang too long it becomes dark and dry.

For boiling a leg of mutton, allow a quarter of an hour to the pound and serve with caper sauce.

For roasting allow the same time, baste well and serve with jelly.

TO ROAST A PIG

Have a very young pig, Two medium-sized onions, A coffee cup full of breadcrumbs, Two teaspoons of summer savory, Two tablespoons of butter, One saltspoonful of salt, One egg, black pepper to the taste.

Clean the pig well and chop the onions very fine.

Put the butter and breadcrumbs together; add the egg, chopped onion and powdered summer savory, salt and black pepper.

Stuff the pig with this and sew it up with coarse thread.

Truss the fore legs forward and hind legs backward.

Rub the pig with butter, sprinkle with black pepper and salt and dredge with flour.

Just before putting it in the pan, take a sharp knife and cut the skin of the body in squares, but don’t cut any deeper than the skin.

Put hot water in the pan and have a moderate oven.

Baste very often and cook for three hours and a half.

Make a gravy of the drippings, by adding a little summer savory and dredging with a little flour.

QUENELLES

One pound of ground chicken or turkey breast, Six ounces of panada, A quarter of a pound of chopped beef suet, A quarter of a pound of butter, A tablespoon of scraped pork, Two tablespoons of cream sauce, One teaspoon of chopped onion, Nutmeg and grated lemon rind to the taste, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Mix the panada and meat well together with the hand, add the butter, salt, pork and cream sauce and work for two or three minutes.

Then put in the onion, nutmeg, pepper, salt and grated lemon rind.

Let the seasoning be so delicate, that the taste of no one ingredient can be detected above the other.

Shape about three inches long, two inches wide and two inches thick, roll in flour and cook as croquettes. Serve with a white champignon sauce poured over them.

RISSOLE

A quarter of a pound of the breast of chicken or turkey, A quarter of a pound of sweetbreads, A quarter of a pound of butter, A pint of rich cream, A teaspoon of parsley, Yolks of three hard-boiled eggs, Nutmeg, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Chop the chicken, sweetbreads and parsley, very fine and mix with the butter; then stir in the cream and hard boiled eggs rubbed very fine; when thoroughly mixed, put in the nutmeg, salt and cayenne pepper.

Put all into a saucepan and stir until it boils, then put it in the ice chest to get cold.

Make some nice pastry, roll very thin and cut with a biscuit cutter, roll an oblong shape, put in a large spoonful of the mixture. Turn the pastry, which will make it a half-moon shape.

Grease the ends inside with butter and press them gently together. Dip in egg, then in vermicelli, which must be broken in small pieces. Let them stand a little while, then fry in boiling lard like croquettes.

A DELICIOUS WAY TO USE UP COLD ROAST BEEF

One cup full of turnips, cut in dice, One cup full of carrots, cut in dice, One chopped onion, Some slices of cold roast beef, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One tablespoon of flour, Two tablespoons of currant jelly, Half a teacup full of wine.

Put the vegetables into a skillet with a quart of water, some salt and some pepper.

Let them boil for one hour, then put in the beef and currant jelly.

While the meat is heating, rub the butter and flour together and stir in until it thickens.

Then heat the wine and add.

Use a medium sized coffee cup for measuring.

TO ROAST A SIRLOIN OF BEEF

Time to roast, a quarter of an hour to the pound,

If wanted more cooked, roast twenty minutes the pound.

Have a good oven, put a little clarified beef dripping in the pan and baste well as soon as it begins to cook.

Baste again and every quarter of an hour after, until twenty minutes before it is done, then sprinkle salt and black pepper and dredge flour over the sirloin and turn it.

When nicely browned, take it off the fire.

Make a gravy in the pan, by adding a little more hot water and dredging a little more flour, then stir until it thickens.

ROLLED STEAK

A large tender steak, One teacup full of breadcrumbs, One medium sized chopped onion, Two teaspoons of chopped parsley, Two teaspoons of powdered summer savory, Half a teaspoon of powdered allspice, Half a teaspoon of powdered mace, Half a teaspoon of black pepper, A saltspoonful of salt.

Get either a sirloin, or a porter-house steak. If the latter, cut out the bone and pound just enough to flatten it out well, so it will roll nicely.

Mix the above ingredients thoroughly together and as you roll the steak, sprinkle freely with the preparation.

Then tie firmly with twine and put it, with a pint of hot water, into a skillet, on the fire, two hours before dinner.

Baste well and turn frequently, for one hour; pour off the gravy, put a cover on the skillet and set it back on the range for an hour, so as the steak will brown nicely.

Before taking it off the fire, put the gravy into a saucepan, with a tea- spoon of browned flour and stir until it thickens; then add a wineglassful of Madeira wine and pour over the steak.

Cut the twine in several places, so as not to disturb the form of the steak.

TONGUE A LA MODE

One fresh beef tongue, Half a teaspoon of whole black pepper, One teaspoon of ground cloves, One teaspoon of ground cinnamon, One teaspoon of celery seed, One teaspoon of ground allspice, One dozen bay leaves, Two medium sized onions, One pint of vinegar, one lemon, Water enough to cover.

Get a stone crock, one foot in diameter and six inches high.

Put a fresh beef tongue in it, with the above ingredients and boil until tender.

Cook one can of champignons three quarters of an hour, take out a pint of the broth, thicken with soft gingerbread and pour over the tongue.

The onions and lemon must be sliced and be sure to take the seeds from the lemon.

Add salt to the taste, when boiling. Add also, half a tumbler of sherry.

TO ROAST A FILLET OF VEAL

A six-pound fillet of veal, One pint of breadcrumbs, One cooking-spoonful of butter, One teaspoon of summer savory, One teaspoon of chopped onion, One saltspoonful of powdered mace, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Take the bone out of the fillet, mix the breadcrumbs with the other ingredients and put them in where the bone was.

On the top there will be a piece of skin, skewer that over the stuffing

Pepper and flour and put three thin slices of pickled pork on the fillet; then put it in the pan with a quart of boiling water.

Put another pan on top, so as the steam will assist in the cooking.

This must be put in the oven five hours before dinner.

Keep the top pan on for three hours, basting constantly; remove it then, so as it will be nicely browned.

About fifteen minutes before dinner, open the oven door, so as it will not cook any longer.

Take out a pint of the gravy, add a teaspoon of browned flour, a dessertspoonful of tomato catsup; stir until it thickens; put into a gravy- boat and serve with the veal.

VEAL CUTLETS

Two large veal cutlets, A teacup full of breadcrumbs, A teaspoon of chopped parsley, A teaspoon of summer savory, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, One large onion, One egg.

Rub the veal cutlets with egg; sprinkle them well with breadcrumbs and brown them in butter and lard, mixed, for about ten minutes.

Peel and chop the onion and brown that also; add to the gravy a pint of boiling water, the parsley, powdered summer savory, salt and pep- per.

Put the cutlets back and let them simmer for an hour.

Take them up; stir a tablespoon of tomato catsup in the gravy and pour it over the cutlets.

If the gravy should be thin, a teaspoon of browned flour should be put in before the catsup.

VEAL LOAF

Three pounds of lean veal. Two pounds of fresh pork. Two teaspoons of black pepper, A small saltspoonful of cayenne pepper, Two teaspoons of salt, One tablespoon of summer savory, Ten pulverized crackers, Six eggs.

Chop the veal and pork as fine as possible; mix the salt and pepper together and put into the meat; then the crackers, eggs; lastly the summer savory — rubbed very fine.

Mix well with the hands; mold into a loaf and put it in a pan with a teacup full of water.

Add occasionally a few small pieces of butter on the top, which will assist in basting, cooking and browning nicely.

Bake carefully in a good oven for two hours, but don’t let it be too hot.

VEAL LOAF II

Three pounds of veal cutlets, A teacup full of breadcrumbs, Half a teacup full of sweet milk, A tablespoon of butter, A teaspoon of powdered summer savory, A dessertspoonful of salt, Nutmeg to the taste, One egg.

Chop the cutlets as fine as possible, add the breadcrumbs, milk and butter melted, mix thoroughly.

Then put in the summer savory, eggs, salt and cayenne pepper.

Put into a nicely shaped bowl and bake for three hours, basting occasionally with a little hot water.

It would be a great improvement to put a teacup full of Madeira wine in the water when basting it.

Serve cold.

VEAL LOAF III

Three pounds of lean veal, Two pounds of fresh pork, Two heaping teaspoons of black pepper, Two heaping teaspoons of salt, One heaping tablespoon of summer savory, One teaspoon of thyme, Ten pulverized crackers, Yolks of six raw eggs.

Chop the veal and pork as fine as possible.

Rub the thyme and summer savory to a powder and mix with the meat, then add the well beaten yolks.

Lastly, put in the pulverized crackers and, when thoroughly mixed, season with the salt and black pepper.

Mold into a loaf and bake two hours, basting constantly with butter and hot water.

Just half an hour before it is done, add three tablespoons of wine and finish basting.

CREME DE VOLAISLE

Half a pound of chicken breast, Half a pound of beef suet, Half a pound of butter. Two cans of champignons, One teacup full of boiled chopped beef tongue, One teacup full of truffles, Two tablespoons of cream, Salt, cayenne pepper and mace to the taste, Five eggs.

Grind the meat and suet, then pound through a colander, so as to get out all the sinews and threads.

Add the eggs, one at a time, beating as for cake, then the salt, cayenne pepper, mace and liquor of the champignons.

Mix well and line a mold made for the purpose, leaving a hollow in the center for the sauce, which make in the following manner:

Cut up the champignons and mix with the tongue; then add the cream, butter and a little more cayenne pepper and salt to the taste.

Fill the hollow, leaving out some to go around the mold when it is served; cover over with a little of the chicken mixture, put the tin top tightly on and steam for three hours.

Decorate the dish with cut-up truffles and hard-boiled eggs, according to taste.

Serve hot.

SAUCES FOR MEATS

TO MAKE A SAUCE FOR BOUILLI

One pint of water the bouilli was cooked in, One saltspoonful of ground allspice, One teaspoon of browned flour, Two tablespoons of Madeira wine, Salt and black pepper to taste.

Take the pint of water the bouilli has cooked in, skim off all of the grease and if very thick, add half a teacup full of hot water.

Stir in the allspice and the browned flour, moistened with a little cold water to mix it.

Let this boil five minutes and just before putting it in the sauce-boat heat the wine and stir it in.

Put the bouilli on a heated dish, garnish tastefully with the vegetables and small sprigs of parsley.

TO MAKE DRAWN BUTTER

One pint of milk, Two tablespoons of butter, One teaspoon of corn starch, Salt to the taste.

Put the milk on in a saucepan.

While it is boiling, rub the corn starch and butter well together and stir in until it thickens, then put in salt to the taste.

This can be served either with a tablespoon of capers, or two hard- boiled eggs, chopped and stirred in.

If capers are used, have them in the sauce boat and pour the drawn butter over them.

The sauce boat must be heated.

Flour can be used for thickening if preferred.

CAPER SAUCE

A quarter of a pound of butter, A pint of boiling water, A tablespoon of flour, Salt to the taste, A tablespoon of capers.

Cream the butter and flour and mix slowly with the boiling water and salt.

Let it boil until it is as thick as cream, then put in the capers. Should capers not be convenient, put in a tablespoon of chopped cucumber pickle, or a teaspoon of vinegar.

CHAMPIGNON SAUCE

Two cans of champignons, One quart of clear soup, One dessertspoonful of flour, One cooking-spoonful of butter, Two tablespoons of wine, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Cut the champignons into small pieces and cook in their own liquor for half an hour.

Let the clear soup come to a boil and add to the champignons, with the salt and cayenne pepper.

Rub the flour and butter and stir in the champignons until quite thick.

Heat the wine and pour in before serving.

A SAUCE FOR EITHER BAKED OR BOILED FISH

One teaspoon of mixed mustard, One tablespoon of walnut or mushroom catsup, One dessertspoonful of butter, One tablespoon of olive oil, Two medium-sized cucumber pickles, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, One large onion.

Chop the onion very fine, sprinkle with a little browned flour and fry until well browned.

Mix the onion and catsup together and boil five minutes, then stir in the oil, butter, salt and cayenne pepper.

Lastly, the cucumber pickles, chopped very fine.

SAUCE A LA HOLLANDAISE FOR FISH

One pint of boiled milk, Two tablespoons of butter, One tablespoon of flour, One tablespoon of Madeira wine, One tablespoon of capers, Salt and cayenne pepper, to the taste, One egg.

Put the milk into a saucepan and when it comes to a boil, stir in the well-beaten eggs, salt and cayenne pepper, also extract of celery, to the taste.

Cream the butter and flour until perfectly smooth and stir into the milk until it thickens.

Have the capers in the sauce boat and pour the sauce over them and serve very hot.

TARTARE SAUCE FOR FISH

The yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, The yolks of two raw eggs, Eight tablespoons of olive oil, Three dessertspoonfuls of vinegar, One teaspoon of chopped onion, One tablespoon of capers, Salt and cayenne pepper, to the taste.

Mash the hard-boiled eggs, add the raw eggs to them and beat until perfectly smooth and light.

Then beat in well, the oil and vinegar, in alternation.

Add the onion and capers, the salt and cayenne pepper.

Serve cold in a sauce boat.

LOBSTER SAUCE

Make a sauce a la Hollandaise; heat the lobster and stir in.

Shrimp and salmon sauce can be made in the same way.

Do not cut up the shrimps and simply take out the bones and remove the skin of the lobster and salmon.

Always serve these sauces hot, with fish.

BROWN SAUCE FOR MEATS

One pint of clear soup, One teaspoon of browned flour, One dessertspoonful of butter, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put the soup into a saucepan with hot water underneath, with the salt and cayenne pepper.

While it is boiling, rub the flour and butter together and stir in the sauce until it thickens, then serve.

A small wineglassful of sherry or Madeira wine can be added just before serving if preferred.

MINT SAUCE

Two tablespoons of fresh mint, One teaspoon of brown sugar, Half a teacup full of vinegar, Half a teacup full of water.

Put the vinegar, sugar and water in a gravy boat.

Chop the mint very fine and stir in. Let this stand for half an hour before using it.

This quantity can be increased according to the number of guests to be served.

SAUCE FOR QUENELLES

Two cans of champignons, One pint of cream, A heaping tablespoon of butter, One tablespoon of flour, Nutmeg, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Cut the champignons up in small pieces and put them into a saucepan with their own liquor, to cook gently for half an hour.

Stir in the cream and while boiling, mix the butter and flour well together and add to the champignons by degrees.

Boil for five minutes, then season with the nutmeg, salt and cayenne pepper. Use two tablespoons of this sauce for the quenelles, leaving out the champignons.

TRUFFLE SAUCE

One pound can of truffles, One pint of clear soup, One tablespoon of butter, One teaspoon of white flour, One teaspoon of browned flour, Two tablespoons of sherry wine, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Chop the truffles and put them with their liquor into a saucepan with the clear soup.

Boil steadily for half an hour.

Rub the flour and butter together, stir in the truffles and simmer until thick, then add the wine, salt and cayenne pepper

This sauce is delicious in an omelette, only don’t put as much of the sauce as of the truffles.

This is also delicious for meats and entrees

TOMATO SAUCE FOR STEAKS AND CHOPS

One pint of tomatoes, One small carrot, Two whole cloves, A small piece of a blade of mace, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One onion.

The tomatoes must be measured after they have been peeled and cut up.

Peel and quarter the onion; scrape and divide the carrot.

Put the tomatoes into a saucepan with the other ingredients and stew until the carrot and onion are tender.

Pour through a sieve, return to the saucepan and thicken with a teaspoon of flour and a dessertspoonful of butter. Serve very hot.

CREAM SAUCE FOR BOILED TURKEY

One pint of the water the turkey was boiled in, Two tablespoons of butter, One tablespoon of flour, Half a coffee cup full of boiled milk, Three stalks of celery, Salt to the taste.

Put the pint of water in a saucepan on the fire; put in the boiled milk, cream the butter and flour and stir in.

Add the salt; cut the celery about four inches long, boil it twenty minutes and drop into the sauce.

Slice some pieces of the breast of boiled turkey, enough for a nice dish and pour the sauce over them.

This is delicious and can be served as a course, after fish.

TO MAKE THE OYSTER SAUCE FOR BOILED TURKEY

One quart of oysters, One pint of cream or rich milk, One dessertspoonful of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Strain the liquor from the oysters and put it into a saucepan to boil.

Add the cream, then the flour moistened with a little cold water.

Let this boil until it thickens, then season and drop in the oysters.

When they curl, take them off; serve in a sauce boat.

If cream is not to be had, put into the milk a cooking-spoonful of butter and a tablespoon of flour.

WHITE SAUCE FOR VEGETABLES

One pint of sweet cream, Two pieces of celery, One teaspoon of flour, One dessertspoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Boil the cream with the celery until it tastes well of it, then take it out and put in the salt and black pepper to the taste.

Rub the flour and butter together and stir in until it thickens.

If celery is out of season, tie a saltspoonful of celery seed in a piece of fine muslin and boil in the cream or the celery can be left out altogether.

FOWL AND GAME

TO BOIL A CHICKEN

One fat, tender chicken, Two-thirds of a pint of breadcrumbs, Half a teaspoon of sweet marjoram, One dessertspoonful of butter, Salt, black pepper and nutmeg to the taste.

Wash the chicken and wipe dry.

Rub the butter and breadcrumbs together and if too dry, add a teaspoon of water.

Put in the powdered marjoram, salt, black pepper and a suspicion of nutmeg; stuff the chicken with this and skewer tightly.

Wrap a cloth around the chicken and boil until tender, which will take from an hour and a quarter, to an hour and a half.

Make a rich drawn butter and stir in two chopped hard-boiled eggs; pour some over the chicken and serve the rest in a boat.

FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN

One tender chicken, One teacup full of butter, One tablespoon of flour, One bunch of parsley, A saltspoonful of celery seed.

Wash the chicken and cut it up as for frying, put into a stewpan, with hot water enough to cover it, the celery seed and salt; let it boil gently, taking off the scum as it rises, until it is tender, which will take about one hour.

Rub the butter and flour together, put into the stew pan with the well chopped parsley; let it stew fifteen minutes. Add the yolks of two raw eggs; stir as you would for custard and boil five minutes longer.

Serve on a dish with boiled rice arranged nicely around it. When putting the celery into the stew pan, put it in a thin piece of muslin.

BROWN FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN

One chicken, One cup full of suet dripping or lard, One teaspoon of salt, One tablespoon of flour, One tablespoon of butter, A teaspoon of summer savory tied in a bag, Cayenne pepper to the taste.

Cut the chicken into joints, dividing the back and breast into two pieces each; lay these into cold water, slightly salted, for half an hour and wipe dry.

Roll each piece in flour; heat a cup full of dripping or lard ; add the salt and pepper and when the fat is at boiling point, lay in the pieces of chicken, frying brown on both sides.

When all the pieces are fried, lay them in a saucepan and cover with boiling water, letting the water be an inch above the chicken; it will be well to pour this water into the frying pan first, to simmer for a few minutes, so as to secure a little of the gravy.

Cover closely and if the chicken is tender, it will be done in an hour and a half.

For the gravy, take a pint of what the chicken was boiled in, cream, flour and butter; stir into the broth and simmer until it thickens.

Put the chicken on a hot dish, pour over some of the gravy and put the rest in a boat.

Put the summer savory in the chicken, when put to boil and take it out before making the gravy.

TO FRY CHICKEN

One fat, tender chicken, Two thin slices of pork, One teacup full of sweet cream, Two teaspoons of chopped parsley, One teacup full of pure lard.

Divide the chicken nicely, salt and pepper each piece, using black pepper and dredge with flour.

Lay them aside on a board until you get the pork fried and the lard boiling.

Drop in a few pieces at the time, allowing room in the pan for each piece to be nicely turned.

As fast as the pieces are fried, put them on a dish over hot water to keep them hot while the gravy is being made.

Pour off some of the grease, dredge in flour and let it brown.

Have the parsley in the cream; pour in a little at the time and let it get thoroughly mixed.

Put the chicken back in the gravy for three or four minutes; then arrange on a dish and pour the gravy over.

JAMBALAYA OF CHICKEN AND RICE

One good sized chicken, Two large tomatoes, One thin slice of pickled pork, One teacup full of rice, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, One large onion.

Prepare the chicken as for gumbo; peel and cut up the tomatoes and onions and fry all together.

While frying, slowly, have the rice boiling and boil until it swells; add it to the chicken, etc. and fry until a light brown.

CHICKEN PIE

One tender chicken, Two pints of sweet milk, Half a pound of butter, Two tablespoon of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One quart of water.

Divide the chicken as for frying and put it on with the quart of water, which should be freshly boiled. When it is done, take it out of the pot; then simmer the water until reduced to a pint; then add the salt, pepper, milk, butter and flour.

Boil ten minutes and line a dish with pie crust; fill it with the chicken; cover with a top crust and bake slowly one hour.A little celery can be boiled with the chicken or a bunch of parsley.

Just keep the chicken covered with water, while it is cooking.

TO ROAST A CHICKEN

One tender, fat chicken, Two-thirds of a pint of breadcrumbs, Half a teaspoon of summer savory, One dessertspoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Wash the chicken and wipe dry.

Rub the butter with the breadcrumbs and the powdered summer savory, then the salt and pepper.

Stuff the inside of this and skewer well.

Put two thin slices of pickled pork across the breast bone and a pint of hot water in the pan.

Have a good oven; baste frequently for an hour and a half.

Put the giblets on to cook at the same time you put the chicken to roast; chop very fine, dredge some flour in the pan and when the gravy thickens stir, in the giblets, adding salt and pepper.

Serve the gravy in a boat.

CURRY

Two tablespoons of curry, One teaspoon of ground ginger, One teaspoon of salt, Three tablespoons of flour, Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, One quart of clear water.

Prepare the meat as for a stew.

Mash the yolks well; add to them the curry, ginger and salt.

Mix well with the water; then put in the flour; stew the meat in this mixture until done; serve with rice.

Put the meat in the center of the dish, pour the sauce over it and put the rice around it. By the sauce is meant what the meat was stewed in.

TO COOK CANVAS BACK DUCKS

One canvas back duck, Some currant jelly, Salt and black pepper.

Wipe out the inside of the duck and if at all strong, wash out with a little saleratus water.

Sprinkle the inside with black pepper, also sprinkle a little on the outside, with some salt and flour.

Lay a thin slice of pickled pork across the breast bone; have a very hot fire, baste every five minutes and let the duck cook just eighteen minutes;

When putting the duck in the pan, a pint of hot water could be put in to baste with.

Make a brown gravy of clear soup, currant jelly and wine to the taste.

Serve quickly, as a canvas-back should never be overdone, or al- lowed to stand; some like it just red hot through.

The gravy can be omitted if objected to.

TO ROAST DUCKS

One medium sized onion, One teaspoon of powdered summer savory, One teacup full of breadcrumbs, One tablespoon of butter, Salt and pepper to the taste.

The above ingredients are for stuffing one duck.

Select a young duck and fill it with the stuffing; sprinkle a little salt and black pepper on top and dredge with flour.

Lay two thin pieces of pickled pork across the breastbone and put it into a pan with a little hot water. Baste frequently and cook for an hour.

Serve with brown gravy, made of the giblets and currant jelly.

TO ROAST WILD DUCKS

Some currant jelly, A few thin slices of lemon, One thin slice of pickled pork, Salt, pepper and flour.

Do not stuff.

Put a teaspoon of black pepper inside of the duck, sprinkle flour and salt on the outside and lay the slice of pork across the breast bone.

Put it in the pan with a pint of hot water, have a hot fire and baste frequently for twenty or twenty-five minutes, according to the size.

Make a brown gravy; stir in currant jelly to the taste and serve in a boat.

Garnish the dish with thin slices of lemon and small sprigs of parsley.

TO ROAST A GOOSE

One young goose, Three large onions, One teaspoon of powdered sage, Two teacup fulls of bread crumbs, One heaping tablespoon of butter, One tablespoon of chopped pork, Salt and pepper to the taste; one egg.

As you truss the goose, cut out the neck and put back the piece of flesh that surrounded it.

Sprinkle pepper and salt over the goose and dredge with flour.

Keep the giblets for the gravy.

Lay on the breastbone three thin slices of pickled pork, put it in the pan with a quart of hot water and baste every ten or fifteen minutes.

If it is a green goose cook two hours, if an older goose, cook nearly three hours.

Make a nice brown gravy, put the chopped giblets in and serve in a boat.

Have some nice apple sauce in a dish to serve also with the goose.

TO BOIL GROUSE

One good -sized grouse, A quarter of a pound of butter, Salt and black pepper.

Split the grouse down the back; have ready one half of the butter in a hot skillet; pepper the grouse well; put it in the skillet; keep pressing and turning it all the time it is cooking and add the rest of the butter by degrees.

Put it on a heated dish; pour over the gravy that is in the skillet and garnish with sprigs of parsley.

Roast a grouse as you would a canvas-back, only cook it fifteen minutes longer.

Serve it with wine and jelly in a brown sauce.

TO BROIL PRAIRIE CHICKEN

One fat young prairie chicken, Four tablespoons of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Pepper the chicken and rub with a little butter; have a hot fire; broil a little on one side, then on the other.

Have some more butter in a pan, with pepper and salt; press the chicken well in it, then broil until done.

Put on a hot dish and pour over it the melted butter in which it was pressed; garnish with sprigs of parsley and serve immediately.

TO ROAST QUAILS

A few oysters. Some breadcrumbs, Butter, salt and black pepper.

Put over each breast bone a thin slice of pickled pork and a little salt and pepper.

For each quail chop the soft parts of two oysters.

Mix a little butter, some of the oyster liquor, with a heaping tablespoon of breadcrumbs and salt and black pepper to the taste.

Put this quantity in each bird; put them into a pan with a little hot water, baste well, roast twenty minutes and serve quickly.

Garnish the birds and around the dish with sprigs of parsley.

Another way to roast quails is simply to put a teaspoon of black pepper inside of each bird, with the pork, etc., on the outside; and baste well.

Or make a chestnut stuffing, as for turkey and fill each bird with some of it.

TO BROIL QUAILS

Have a quick fire; put the quails on the broiler and have some butter, pepper and salt in a pan nearby.

When each side of the quail has been partly broiled, press well in the pan holding the butter, etc., drain each bird well.

Return to the broiler and cook until done.

Serve on some nicely cut squares of toast.

A NICE DISH OF QUAILS AND TRUFFLES

Eight fat young quails, One wineglassful of wine, Half a pound of truffles, One pint of clear soup, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Cut out the breasts of eight quails; divide them and broil very delicately; cook the truffles for three-quarters of an hour in the pint of clear soup.

Thicken with a teaspoon of browned flour and a tablespoon of butter.

Add the wine; arrange the quails’ breasts nicely on a dish; sprinkle the truffles over them; then pour over the sauce.

TO ROAST REED BIRDS

Some nice, fat reed birds, Black pepper, butter and salt. Kub them with butter and sprinkle with black pepper.

Have a good fire; put them in a pan with a little butter and baste well for fifteen minutes.

These little birds are so delicate that you can eat bones and all.

They can be fried also in the following manner: Split them down the back; place each bird on pieces of buttered toast to catch the juices; sprinkle them with pepper and have butter in the pan; baste well and allow about twelve minutes, as they will cook quicker when split open.

TO ROAST SNIPE AND WOODCOCK

Some snipe or woodcock. Some thin slices of pickled pork, Butter, black pepper and salt.

First pluck them and take the skin off the heads and necks.

Put the heads under the wings, pepper each one well, lay one thin slice of pickled pork across the breast bone of each bird and skewer it.

Have a bright fire; put each bird over a slice of buttered toast, to catch the trail.

Put a little butter in the pan to start the basting and baste each bird well every five minutes, cook twenty minutes.

Sprinkle a little salt over each bird and serve quickly on the pieces of toast they were cooked on.

Garnish with sprigs of parsley and slices of lemon.

TO BOIL A TURKEY

Sprinkle a cloth with flour, tie the turkey up in it. put it in a pot and cover with cold water.

Let it boil slowly for half an hour, taking off the scum as it rises, set the pot back and let it simmer slowly for two hours, or two and a half, according to the size.

Serve with a white sauce.

THE SAUCE

One pint of the water the turkey has boiled in, Half a teacup full of cream.

Put the water into a saucepan.

Add the cream and salt to the taste. Let it boil.

While boiling mix a teaspoon of flour with cold water; stir in and let it boil until it thickens.

Have ready in the sauce boat, the chopped yolks of four hard-boiled eggs and pour the sauce over them.

Garnish the turkey with slices of hard boiled eggs and a little of the sauce poured over it.

BOUDINS A LA RICHELIEU

Some raw turkey breast, One half as much butter, Three eggs, Salt, nutmeg and pepper to taste.

Take as much turkey breast as you wish, say a heavy pound, grate and pound in a mortar until it can be passed through a fine sieve.

Add half as much butter as there is turkey breast and one-third as much paste, made as follows:

Take the inside of a loaf of bread, soak it in milk and dry on the range, but don’t let it get in the least hard, then add the butter until it becomes a stiff paste.

Add the eggs, nutmeg, salt and pepper to the taste.

Fry a small piece in boiling water, to see that it is not too stiff or too soft. If too stiff add more yolks. The above should be a light-yellow in color.

TO MAKE THE SAUCE FOR THE BOUDINS

One fourth of a box of truffles, One large wineglassful of sherry wine, One aschalot.

Chop and cook the aschalot; put into a pan with the sherry wine, then add the chopped truffles.

Let all cook again until nearly dry, then stir in a tablespoon of brown sauce.

Simmer for ten minutes and put into a dish to cool.

The boudin should be the shape and size of a wafer cake and rolled in heavy white paper, wet with sweet oil inside and outside.

Then boil in clear soup for twenty-five minutes and serve with the sauce.

TO ROAST A TURKEY

Tie the legs and wings together or fasten with skewers.

Put in the stuffing, salt and pepper well, dredge with flour, lay three thin slices of pickled pork across the breast bone and put it into a pan with a pint of hot water; increasing it as you think necessary to make a sufficient quantity of gravy.

Baste it frequently and roast from two hours and a half to three hours, according to its size.

When it is done, take some of the gravy, say a pint, put in a teaspoon of flour and stir until it thickens.

Chop up the gizzards and liver, which have been previously well cooked and mix with the gravy.

It is always well, when putting the turkey to roast, to put a pan over it, until half done, then remove the pan so as to let it brown nicely.

This will keep the turkey from roasting too quickly or drying up.

STUFFING FOR A TURKEY

One loaf of stale bread, A quarter of a pound of butter. One teaspoon of summer savory, Salt and black pepper to the taste, The yolks of three eggs.

Cut off all the crust of the bread and pour on it enough hot water to soak it thoroughly; then squeeze all of the water out of it.

Put the pepper and salt in the bread, mix with the eggs and summer savory; then put all into the turkey and sew it up carefully.

CHESTNUT STUFFING FOR A TURKEY

One teacup full of boiled mashed chestnuts, One teacup full of mashed sweet potato, One dessertspoonful of butter, One wineglassful of cream, Salt to the taste, Black pepper to the taste.

Mix the potato, chestnut and cream well together, then add the salt and black pepper.

When the turkey is half roasted, put in the stuffing and continue to baste well until done.

Get the Spanish chestnuts. This makes a delicious stuffing for quails also.

TO STUFF A TURKEY WITH OYSTERS

Twenty -five large oysters, Half a pint of breadcrumbs, One tablespoon of chopped celery, Two tablespoon s of cream, Salt and black pepper to the taste, The yolk of one egg.

Chop the oysters fine, mix with the celery, cream and breadcrumbs.

Add the yolk of the egg, then the salt and pepper.

Mix thoroughly and put in the turkey.

Boil, as in the recipe for boiling a turkey and serve with oyster sauce.

ANOTHER WAY TO ROAST AND STUFF A TURKEY

One turkey, weighing ten or twelve pounds, One dozen chopped oysters, One pint of bread crumbs, One teaspoon of powdered summer savory, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, Black pepper, salt and nutmeg to the taste, Two eggs.

Truss the turkey; put the salt, pepper, nutmeg and summer savory in the breadcrumbs

Rub in the butter, then moisten with the eggs; add the chopped oysters and stuff the turkey, sewing it up very carefully, so as the stuffing will not come out.

Cut three thin slices of pickled pork, lay them across the breast bone, dredge the turkey with flour and put into a pan with one inch of water in it.

Roast for two hours and a half, basting frequently.

Make a sauce of the drippings, into which stir in the giblets, which have been previously cooked and chopped fine.

Thicken this sauce with a little brown flour

TO ROAST VENISON

A haunch of venison, Some wine and currant jelly, Brown gravy as required.

Sprinkle the Venison with pepper and salt and cover the whole with white paper greased with butter.

Put it in the oven with a little hot water and two or three thin slices of pickled pork on top.

Baste well for about two hours, then remove the paper and baste well for nearly an hour longer, so as to brown nicely.

Make a brown gravy, by dredging the gravy in the pan with both white and browned flour, then add wine and currant jelly to the taste.Serve very hot in a boat.

TO BROIL VENISON STEAKS

Some nicely cut venison steaks, A few thin slices of lemon, Some currant jelly and sherry wine.

Have a good fire, pepper the steaks well, broil partly on one side, then on the other.

Take them off, rub with butter, return to the gridiron, broil a few minutes longer and put them on a hot dish.

Melt some currant jelly and while hot, add wine to the taste.

Put a few small pieces of butter on each steak, then pour the wine and jelly over, which must be very hot.

If wine and jelly are objected to, then broil as you would a beef steak.

Arrange some thin slices of lemon and sprigs of parsley around the dish.

SALADS

SALAD DRESSING

The yolks of sixteen eggs, Twenty tablespoons of oil, Fifteen tablespoons of vinegar, Nine tablespoons of water, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Beat the eggs, add the oil, vinegar and water in alternation, beating well all the time, then the salt and cayenne pepper.

Put this into a saucepan with boiling water underneath and stir constantly and rapidly until the consistency of very thick custard; put it away to get perfectly cold.

This will be sufficient for one large turkey.

Always cut up as much celery as you have turkey, which must never be chopped, but cut in dice.

The advantage of this dressing is the proportions are so perfect that enough for six turkeys can be made in less than three-quarters of an hour.

The water is put in to keep the vinegar from tasting too strong, or it would destroy the taste of the oil and make the salad too acid.

I always use this dressing when making a large quantity of salad.

SALAD DRESSING II

One well-boiled chicken, Two teacup fulls of celery cut in dice, Two teacup fulls of cream, One tablespoon of mixed mustard, Two heaping tablespoons of butter, Vinegar, salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, The yolks of four eggs.

Put the cream into a saucepan and when it comes to a boil stir in the butter, vinegar, salt and cayenne pepper.

Add the well-beaten eggs; stir well until it becomes like thick boiled custard.

Take it off of the fire, put the saucepan in cold water and stir until it cools, so as to keep it from curdling.

Take off the skin and fat of the chicken, cut it in dice and with the celery, mix carefully with the dressing.

SALAD DRESSING III

Two tablespoons of mixed mustard, Two tablespoons ©f butter, Three tablespoons of oil, Three tablespoons of vinegar, One pint of rich cream, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, Five eggs.

Scald the cream, stir the vinegar in the yolks of the eggs, add the cream and butter, stirring well to keep from curdling, until it thickens; take it off the fire and when cold, beat in the mustard, cayenne pepper and salt.

The whites of the eggs can be beaten very light and added to the mixture when it is cold, but it will be found good enough without them.

A little of the extract of celery is a great improvement.

SWEETBREAD SALAD

The yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, The yolks of two raw eggs, One teaspoon of dry mustard, Two cruets of the best oil, One tablespoon of vinegar, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Mash the yolks of the eggs smoothly together, then sprinkle in the mustard and beat in by degrees the oil and vinegar.

Season to the taste and beat hard for a few minutes. If it is too stiff, add the juice of one lemon.

Have the sweetbreads well cooked and picked to pieces, taking off all of the skin.

Put the dressing on in alternate layers with the sweetbreads and garnish the dish with small heads of crisped lettuce.

SHRIMP SALAD

Two cans of shrimps, Yolks of two hard boiled eggs, Yolks of two raw eggs, Twelve tablespoons of oil, Salt, cayenne pepper to taste.

Mix the eggs perfectly smooth, then beat in the oil slowly, alternating every third tablespoon with half a teaspoon of vinegar and three drops of lemon juice.

When very light add the salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Don’t put this over the shrimps until they are to be served.

In the winter, cut up as much celery as you have shrimps and mix in.

In the summer, put the shrimps in the center of the dish, pour the dressing over them and put delicate pieces of lettuce around.

Always put the dressing on the ice for a while before serving.

If this quantity should not be enough, more oil, vinegar and lemon juice can be beaten in.

A SALAD OF CABBAGE AND CELERY

One pint of cabbage, One pint of celery, One teacup full of vinegar, A tablespoon of butter, A teaspoon of mixed mustard, A tablespoon of rich cream, Salt and cayenne pepper to taste, Yolks of two eggs.

Beat the eggs, stir in the vinegar, mustard, melted butter, salt and cayenne pepper.

Put all into a saucepan with boiling water underneath and stir steadily until it thickens. When cold, add the cream.

Cut the cabbage and celery in small pieces, mix well and pour the dressing over.

DRESSING FOR COLE SLAW

Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, Yolks of two raw eggs, Five tablespoons of oil, Three dessertspoonfuls of vinegar, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Shave the cabbage with a sharp knife until you have a quart.

Put it in a dish and set it on the ice for an hour.

Mash the hard-boiled eggs smoothly, then mix the raw ones with them.

Beat the oil and vinegar in the eggs, alternately and carefully, to prevent curdling.

Lastly, add the salt and cayenne pepper.

Have the dressing in a small bowl and pour it over the cabbage as you serve it.

The above quantity will be sufficient for six persons.

VEGETABLES. TO BOIL POTATOES

When putting potatoes on to boil, always choose them of equal size, or the small ones will cook too quickly and the large ones will not be sufficiently cooked.

Let the water be boiling and put in it a teaspoon of salt.

Either peel the potatoes or boil them without peeling.

Put them in the boiling water and boil until thoroughly done, which will take about half an hour.

Pour off the water, sprinkle a little salt over them, shake them around gently, remove the lid and let them remain about five minutes over the fire to steam.

They should be dry and flaky.

Never let them remain in the water a moment after they are done and serve immediately.

TO BAKE POTATOES WITH THEIR JACKETS ON

Choose them of equal size.

Have your oven well heated and bake until tender.

A large potato will take an hour, a medium-sized one about three-quarters of an hour.

Serve as soon as done. If underdone, they will be very indigestible. Neither should they be overdone.

MASHED POTATOES

One quart of mashed potatoes, Half a teacup full of cream, One tablespoon of butter, Salt to the taste.

Boil them properly, then throw them into a colander and mash them well through it.

After they are thoroughly mashed, put them into a saucepan with hot water underneath and add the butter, cream and salt.

Beat well for five or ten minutes and serve.

If cream is not to be had, use milk and increase the quantity of butter.

If preferred to be baked, put into a baking dish and brown in the oven for about ten minutes.

TO BAKE POTATOES WITH BEEF

Mash and peel as many potatoes as you have guests to serve and have them all as near the same size as possible.

Put them in the pan with the beef. If medium sized, three quarters of an hour will be sufficient for baking them; if large, it will require one hour.

As often as you baste the beef, baste the potatoes and when done and nicely browned, serve them on the same dish, arranged nicely around the beef.

SCALLOPED POTATOES

Eight good sized Irish potatoes, A heaping tablespoon of butter, Flour, salt and black pepper.

Peel the potatoes and slice them thin.

Have ready a deep dish that will hold two quarts.

Put in a layer of potatoes, dredge well with flour, then a second layer of potatoes, which dredge again with flour and sprinkle a little salt and black pepper.

On the third layer, cut the butter in small pieces and arrange nicely over the potatoes, then fill up with rich milk or cream, leaving room enough in the dish to cook slowly for two hours.

If the potatoes should soak up the milk or cream, add more, so as to have the potatoes creamy, when they go to the table.

Be sure not to cook too rapidly.

This quantity will be sufficient for a family of eight.

TO STEW POTATOES

One quart of boiled potatoes, One pint of sweet milk, One large cooking spoonful of butter, One heaping teaspoon of flour, Salt and black pepper, to the taste.

Boil the potatoes and while hot, cut them in dice, then measure a quart.

Put the milk into a saucepan and when it comes to a boil, put in the potatoes and let them simmer.

While simmering, cream the butter and flour, put into the potatoes and stir until the milk is the consistency of thick custard, then add salt and a very little black pepper.

A teaspoon of chopped parsley is sometimes a pleasant addition.

Be sure, after putting the potatoes in the milk, not to let them cook long or hard enough to break and get mushy.

One pint of cream can be used and in that case leave out the butter.

SARATOGA POTATOES

Three large potatoes, Half a pint of fresh lard, A little salt.

Peel the potatoes and cut them with a potato cutter into slices as thin as a wafer.

Put them into a pan of ice water for half an hour.

Have the colander in a pan in the oven with the door open.

Put a few slices at the time in the boiling lard and when a delicate yellow, take them out and put them in the colander to dry, sprinkling a little salt over them as you put them in.

When all are fried, put them in a heated dish and serve.

A frying basket made of fine wire is exceedingly nice for frying the potatoes in, as you can take them out of the lard without any trouble, by merely lifting the basket and pouring them into the colander to drain.

The pan underneath the colander is intended to catch the grease.

FRIED POTATOES

Take cold boiled potatoes and cut them in slices about a quarter of an inch thick.

Have ready some boiling lard and butter mixed.

Then throw in the potatoes and stir until they are a light yellow.

Put into a sieve before the fire for a moment; sprinkle a little salt over them and serve in a very hot dish.

POTATOES A LA LYONNAISE

One pound of cold boiled potatoes, Two teaspoons of minced onion, Two teaspoons of chopped parsley, One large cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Slice the potatoes.

Put the butter into a skillet; when hot, throw in the potatoes and onions and fry until a light brown.

Put in the chopped parsley and when thoroughly mixed put into a heated napkin, which must be in a heated dish.

Don’t put the cover on the dish, simply close the napkin over the potatoes.

POTATOES A LA PARISIENNE

Have a little round potato cutter about three-quarters of an inch in diameter.

Peel the potatoes and cut as many small ones from each potato as you have guests to serve.

Have the lard boiling, put the little balls into a frying basket and hold it in the lard until the potatoes are done and nicely browned, which will take about fifteen minutes.

Take them out and sprinkle salt over them.

They are nice to garnish a dish of broiled fish with, or to garnish a beef steak or game with.

The pieces of potatoes left from the cutting can be boiled or mashed.

Potatoes cut this way, boiled about fifteen minutes and dressed with a nice white sauce, are very pretty with boiled fish.

POTATOES A LA NEIGE

Prepare the potatoes as for mashed potatoes.

Place the dish they are to be served in over hot water and press the potatoes through the colander into the dish, having previously heated the colander.

They will look like rice or vermicelli and will be very pretty served with venison, roast beef, or beef tongue.

SHOOFLY POTATOES

There is a machine that comes expressly for cutting shoofly potatoes.

The potatoes are cut in strips like macaroni.

Have the boiling lard in the skillet, put the potatoes in a frying basket, then put the basket into the hot lard, fry a nice brown and they will be done.

Then sprinkle salt through them.

Serve in a heated dish with the top off.

POTATO CROQUETTES

Twelve large potatoes, Two tablespoons of butter, One teaspoon of chopped parsley, Salt, black pepper and nutmeg to the taste, Six eggs.

Boil, peel and mash the potatoes and let them get cold; then put them into a bowl with the butter and beat until thoroughly mixed.

Put in the yolks of four of the eggs and two whole ones, continue to beat until very light.

Add the nutmeg, salt, pepper and parsley. Shape as croquettes, dip them in egg and bread crumbs and fry a light brown.

Serve immediately. These are particularly nice with fish.

POTATO CROQUETTES II

Six large potatoes, A tablespoon of butter, One wineglassful of cream, Yolks of two eggs, Salt to the taste.

Peel, boil and mash the potatoes until perfectly smooth; add the salt, then the butter, cream and lastly the eggs; shape as croquettes.

Dip in egg and breadcrumbs and fry in boiling lard a nice brown.

It would be well, after mixing, to let it stand in a cold place for an hour, so as to handle easily.

TO BAKE SWEET POTATOES

Six large, sweet potatoes, Two heaping tablespoons of sugar, Two heaping tablespoons of butter, A little salt.

Boil the potatoes.

When done, peel and slice lengthwise, in two or three pieces; first put in a deep baking dish a layer of potatoes, one tablespoon of sugar, one tablespoon of butter, cut in small pieces and arranged over the potatoes; then another layer of potatoes, sugar and butter; lastly some thin slices of butter and sugar sprinkled freely over them.

Bake about twenty minutes.

Serve hot.

Before sprinkling sugar on top, sprinkle about two tablespoons of hot water, then the sugar.

TO FRY TOMATOES

Six large ripe tomatoes, Half a tumblerful of cream, Some brown sugar, Salt and black pepper.

Slice the tomatoes half an inch thick, but don’t peel them.

Put a few slices at a time into a hot skillet with a cookingspoonful of butter.

Fry a good brown; take them out carefully, place them in a dish which you must have over hot water; and over each layer, sprinkle about a dessertspoonful of sugar, a little salt and black pepper.

When all are fried, pour the cream into the skillet and dredge in flour enough to make it as thick as a drawn butter; stir until smooth and pour over the tomatoes.

If cream is not convenient, they will be just as good without it.

TO STEW TOMATOES

Three pints of tomatoes, Three tablespoons of breadcrumbs, One saltspoonful of chopped onion, One dessertspoonful of butter, One dessertspoonful of brown sugar, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Peel and cut enough tomatoes to make three pints.

Put them into a saucepan with the chopped onion, salt and pepper.

Let them stew for half an hour, then add the breadcrumbs, sugar and butter; stew for an hour longer, chopping the tomatoes frequently while stewing, then serve.

STUFFED TOMATOES

One dozen large tomatoes, One teacup full of chopped tenderloin, Two tablespoons of chopped ham, One tablespoon of chopped parsley, One teaspoon of salt, Half a teaspoon of white pepper, Four pounded crackers, One large chopped onion.

Cut off the stem of each tomato and take out the seed and the pulp, chop fine and mix with the ham, parsley and onions, then put in the salt and pepper, lastly the crackers.

If too stiff, thin with a little water or soup stock.

Fill the tomatoes well with this, put cracker powder and small pieces of butter on each and bake in a moderate oven about an hour.

TO STUFF TOMATOES II

Eight firm, ripe tomatoes, One pint of breadcrumbs, One teaspoon of chopped parsley Half a teaspoon of chopped onion, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One egg.

Moisten the bread crumbs a little; mix with the parsley, salt and pepper.

Cut off a slice from the stem side of the tomato, take out the cores and seeds; chop the cores and mix with the stuffing.

Brown the onion slightly in the skillet with a teaspoon of butter.

Put the stuffing in and brown that a little also.

Then add a dessertspoonful of butter and the egg.

Stir quickly to prevent it from curdling.

Cook ten minutes and stuff the tomatoes with it. Place them close together in a pan; put some grated Cheshire cheese over each tomato; cover closely, baste frequently and bake slowly for one hour.

Remove the cover and brown nicely.

TO BAKE TOMATOES WITHOUT STUFFING

Six good ripe tomatoes, A teaspoon of salt, Half the quantity of black pepper, One cooking-spoonful of butter.

Wash the tomatoes nicely, cut out a little piece from under each stem and put in the little hollow a little salt, black pepper and a small pinch of butter.

Put them in a baking dish with two tablespoons of hot water; bake and baste for one hour and after basting, brown, for ten minutes.

TO SCALLOP TOMATOES

Eight large, full ripe tomatoes, Three tablespoons of bread crumbs, One teaspoon of salt, One saltspoonful of black pepper, One dessertspoonful of brown sugar, One tablespoon of butter.

Pour scalding water over the tomatoes and when well skinned, get out the seeds and cut up the tomatoes fine.

First, put in one-half of the tomatoes, then one-half of the bread crumbs; salt, pepper, butter and sugar.

Sprinkle all well over the tomatoes in layers.

Then put in the rest of the tomatoes and other things with the breadcrumbs last and small pieces of butter scattered here and there on top. Bake one hour and serve.

TO BOIL CABBAGE

Two heads of early York cabbage, One pint of drawn butter.

Take the medium-sized heads of cabbage, pull off the outside leaves, cut through the heads to the stalks, then cut across the other way to the stalks, but don’t cut through.

Put them on in a pot two hours before dinner, in hot water enough to cover well, with a tablespoon of salt in the water.

Boil steadily for one hour, pour off this water, pour on some more hot water, leaving out the salt and boil one hour longer.

Put the heads in a hot dish, make a rich drawn butter and pour over the heads.

After cutting the heads, tie them loosely together with a strong cord and clip it before putting the heads in the dish.

This is delicious and perfectly digestible.

TO FRY CABBAGE

Two quarts of cut up cabbage, Two thick slices of pickled pork, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Put the chopped cabbage with the pork into a skillet and cover with hot water.

Keep it steadily frying for two hours, add the salt and cayenne pepper and fry half an hour longer.

Should the water boil down, add a little more, but not during the last half hour.

Have a heated dish ready, put the pork in the center and the cabbage around it.

The cabbage must be freshly cut.

HOW TO COOK BEETS

Some sugar beets, Butter, salt and pepper.

Wash the beets, but don’t trim the roots too close, or they will bleed and lose their sweetness.

If they are young, cook three hours; if old, cook four hours.

When done, slice them, put into a hot dish; add butter, pepper and salt.

If any should be left, pour vinegar over them and they will be nice the next day.

SPINACH

Wash and pick well; put it in a saucepan with hot water underneath, with a little salt and no more water than remains on the leaves after washing.

Keep the water boiling underneath for an hour, taking care to chop it well with a spoon while cooking.

Before serving, put in a little cream, salt and black pepper.

After mixing well, steam for about five minutes, then put into a heated dish and garnish the top with slices of hard-boiled eggs.

Scrape the outside of the stalks and cut off about an inch of the end.

Tie them evenly in bundles, keeping the heads one way.

Put them in well salted boiling water and cook for a half an hour, or three quarters, according to the size of the stalks.

Drain; have some nicely cut pieces of buttered toast at the bottom of a heated dish; lay the stalks in regularly and pour over them some melted butter, or asparagus sauce.

ASPARAGUS SAUCE

One pint of water the asparagus has cooked in, One cookingspoonful of butter, One dessertspoonful of flour, Salt and black pepper to taste, Yolk of one egg.

Take the pint of water the asparagus was cooked in, put into a saucepan with hot water underneath.

When it comes to a boil, add the egg, salt and pepper.

Rub the butter and flour well together and stir in until the sauce is the consistency of boiled custard.

When putting in the egg first, stir in it a tablespoon of the boiling asparagus water, then put in the saucepan.

This precaution is to keep it from curdling.

TO COOK SUMMER SQUASH

One large summer squash, Two tablespoons cream.

One tablespoon of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Have the squash young and tender; peel, cut up and take out the seeds.

Put it on in hot water and cook steadily until perfectly done.

Drain well and mash with a wooden spoon.

Put into a saucepan, with the butter, cream, pepper and salt.

Simmer and stir constantly, until the squash looks dry, then serve very hot.

BAKED CAULIFLOWER

One fine fresh cauliflower, One ounce of grated Parmesan cheese, One ounce of cracker powder, A tablespoon of butter, A dessertspoonful of flour, White pepper and salt to the taste.

Put the cauliflower, top down, in cold salt and water for an hour, then put it in a pot of well-salted boiling water and boil for twenty minutes.

While it is boiling, mix smoothly the butter and flour, let it simmer for a moment and add to the boiling water, stirring until it thickens, not forgetting to put in the white pepper and salt to the taste.

Lay the cauliflower in a baking dish, pour over the sauce, then sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and cracker powder.

Brown slightly and serve hot at once.

CAULIFLOWER WITH WHITE SAUCE

Two nice heads of cauliflower, One pint of sweet milk of cream, One tablespoon of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Salt and white pepper to the taste.

Take off the outside leaves of the cauliflower and cut off the ends of the stalks.

Put them, with the heads downward, in salt and water for an hour.

Then put them into a pot, with plenty of fast boiling water and cook thirty-five minutes if large and twenty-five if small.

In the meantime, put on the cream to boil, add a teaspoon of flour and let it simmer until it thickens.

Season to the taste and pour over the cauliflower.

If milk is used, rub the flour into a tablespoon of butter and simmer until the milk thickens.

CAULIFLOWER SERVED WITH FRIED CHICKEN

One quart of sweet cream, One dessertspoonful of butter, One dessertspoonful of flour, Salt to the taste.

Put the cream into a saucepan with hot water underneath; cream the butter and flour and when the cream boils, stir in until it thickens, then add the salt.

Put in a teaspoon of chopped parsley just before taking it off the fire.

Place the heads of cauliflower in the center of the dish and pour some of the dressing over them.

Arrange the pieces of fried chicken around them, pour the rest of the dressing over and serve very hot.

GREEN PEAS

Gather them just before being cooked; shell and put them on in boiling water, just enough to keep them well covered and when fresh, they will only take twenty minutes boiling.

If young and tender, wash some of the pods and put them with the peas, always keeping the water a little above them.

Do not let them boil too hard, or they will be mushy.

If the water is allowed to boil down, they will be tough.

If old, they will require longer cooking than twenty minutes.

Put in the water, when putting the peas to cook, about a teaspoon of salt.

Some persons like a little sugar. In that case a dessertspoonful of granulated sugar can be put into a quart of peas.

TO COOK MARROWFAT PEAS

Three pints of hulled peas, Hot water enough to cover them, A teaspoon of salt.

These peas are later, somewhat richer in flavor, but not quite so delicate as the earlier ones.

Put the peas into a saucepan, with the salt and hot water and keep them covered while they are cooking.

If very young, let them boil for twenty minutes.

Throw off that water and cover them with fresh hot water, giving them ten minutes more boiling.

Now mix a teaspoon of flour with a dessertspoonful of butter and stir in until the water thickens, then serve.

Don’t allow them to boil too hard, or they will be mushy.

TO BOIL GREEN CORN

Trim off the husks and silk; put the corn into a pot of boiling water, with a dessertspoonful of salt and cook twenty minutes.

Another way: Leave on the silk and husks; put into a pot of boiling water and a dessertspoonful of salt and boil twenty-five minutes; and take off the husks and silk as quickly as possible and serve.

TO STEW GREEN CORN

One dozen ears of corn, One quart of cold water, One tablespoon of butter, One teaspoon of flour, One pint cup full of boiled milk, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Cut the corn from the cob, put it on with the quart of water and let it stew for half an hour.

Drain off the water; mix the butter and flour with the milk and add to the corn. Let it simmer about five minutes, season and serve.

CORN PUDDING

Twelve ears of corn, Half a pint of sweet milk, Half a pound of butter, A teaspoon of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste, Two eggs.

Grate the corn; then scrape the cob so as to get out the milk.

Add the sweet milk to it, salt, pepper, melted butter and flour, lastly, stir in slowly the well-beaten eggs.

Bake in a slow oven one hour.

CORN PUDDING II

Two dozen ears of corn, A quarter of a pound of butter, A pint of milk, Four eggs, Salt and black pepper to the taste, A tablespoon of flour.

Grate the corn, stir in the milk and eggs, beaten together.

Add the butter (melted) with a tablespoon of flour mixed with it.

Add the salt and black pepper.

Bake one hour in a well-heated oven.

Should this quantity be too much for the number of persons to be served, one-half the quantity can be made.

CORN PUDDING III

Eight ears of corn, One tablespoon of butter, One teacup full of milk, One teaspoon of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste, Three eggs.

First grate the corn, then, with a knife, scrape the cob to get out all of the milk.

Beat the eggs light and stir in; cream the butter and flour.

Mix with the milk, then add the corn; season to the taste and bake three-quarters of an hour.

CORN FRITTERS

Six ears of corn, A dessertspoonful of flour, Two tablespoons of cream, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One egg.

Grate the corn, beat the egg very light and mix with the corn.

Add the cream, flour, salt and pepper.

Fry quickly in hot lard, as fritters.

GUMBO

One large chicken, Three large tomatoes, One large onion, A quart of young okra, Two thin slices of pickled pork, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Skin and divide the chicken.

Peel and cut up the tomatoes and onion and with the salt and cayenne pepper and pickled pork fry until the chicken is two-thirds done.

Boil the okra in water enough to keep it covered for one hour.

Mix with the chicken, etc. and fry until thick, stirring quite often to keep it from sticking.

TO FRY EGGPLANT

Cut the eggplant into slices a half an inch thick, leaving the skin on.

Put them in salt and water and keep them well covered, so as to keep each slice under the water and let them remain one hour.

Make a batter, dip each slice in the batter separately, then into the breadcrumbs.

Have ready in a skillet some boiling lard. Fry each slice a nice brown; drain and serve in a heated dish.

Or cut each slice a little less than a half an inch thick; drop into boiling lard and fry a good brown. Season them as you remove them.

EGGPLANT PUDDING

Two eggplants, Yolks of six hard-boiled eggs, A quarter of a pound of butter, A teaspoon of chopped onion, A teaspoon of sweet marjoram, Three teaspoons of chopped parsley, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, One raw egg.

Split the eggplants and soak them in cold salt and water for two hours.

Parboil them, peel and press out all the water.

Chop very fine, mash the yolks of the hard boiled eggs very smooth and mix with the above.

Add the onion, parsley and sweet marjoram, rubbed and sifted.

Beat the raw egg and mix well, adding lastly, the butter melted, salt and cayenne pepper.

Put into a baking-dish

Dredge some grated cracker on top and bake slowly for half an hour.

TO FRY OKRA AND CORN

One pint of sliced okra, One pint of cut up corn, Half a teacup ful of milk, One teaspoon of flour, One slice of pickled pork, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

First fry the pork, then take it out, leaving only the grease in the pan.

Put in the okra and let it fry ten minutes.

Add the corn and fry until thoroughly cooked.

Mix the flour with the milk, pour it in the okra and corn.

Fry for five minutes longer, season and serve.

A teacup full of chopped tomatoes fried with the above instead of the milk, is an improvement, though it is very good without.

LIMA OR BUTTER BEANS

Shell them and lay them in cold water for an hour (or a little longer, but not less) before cooking, as this makes them more delicate.

When ready for cooking, put them into a saucepan with boiling water enough to cover them and a little salt.

Let them boil steadily for an hour and if young, they will be done and tender; if old, they will take half an hour longer.

When done, pour off nearly all the water, rub a teaspoon of butter with a teaspoon of flour; let it simmer for ten minutes, add salt and black pepper to the taste and serve.

TO COOK SNAP BEANS

Two quarts of snap beans, One coffee cup full of rich milk, Two tablespoons of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Snap the beans and take every particle of string from them.

Put into boiling water, with a teaspoon of salt and boil steadily for two hours, if young; if old, boil three hours.

Boil the milk, rub the flour and butter together and stir in the milk until it thickens.

Pour the milk into the beans.

Season and simmer for five minutes longer, then serve.

TO BOIL RICE

One teacup full of rice, Four teacup fulls of water, One teaspoon of salt.

Pick and wash the rice, rubbing it hard with the hands and changing the water until it ceases to be milky.

Put it in the saucepan with the salt and pour over it the four teacup fulls of clear water. Let it boil steadily for fifteen minutes.

Strain through a colander, return to the saucepan and, with the top off, let it stand on the back of the range for half an hour to dry.

RICE CROQUETTES

One teacup full of rice, One tablespoon of butter, One tablespoon of sugar, One teacup full of milk, One pint of water, Grated rind of one lemon.

Wash the rice thoroughly, put it in a saucepan and pour over the milk and water hot.

Let it boil until the rice is soft, say half an hour; add the butter, sugar and grated lemon rind.

Mix well and spread on a large dish until it dries.

Shape as pears.

Roll each in egg, then in breadcrumbs and let them stand for twenty minutes.

Fry in boiling lard a cinnamon brown and serve hot.

If necessary, drain the milk and water from the rice before putting in the other ingredients.

RICE CROQUETTES II

One large coffee cup full of cold boiled rice, Half a cup full of sweet milk, Two dessertspoonfuls of sugar, One teaspoon of salt, Grated nutmeg to the taste, One egg.

Boil the milk, add the salt, sugar and nutmeg.

Stir in the egg smoothly, boil a minute and take off to cool.

Add the rice, boil two minutes longer and set on the ice to get stiff.

Shape as pears, dip into the yellow of the eggs, then in grated breadcrumbs and fry a cinnamon brown in boiling lard.

When preferred without sugar, a teaspoon of finely chopped parsley or celery can be added.

TO STEW CELERY

Four heads of celery, Four tablespoons of cream, One dessertspoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One teaspoon of flour.

Wash the celery and take off the discolored parts; if there should be much cut off, have five heads.

Cut them in pieces about two inches long, cover with water and boil steadily for half an hour.

Now add the cream and stew half an hour longer; cream the flour and butter, put into the celery and stir until it thickens, then season.

If cream is not to be had, substitute milk and in that case, add another dessertspoonful of butter.

TO FRY CELERY

Four heads of celery, Two well-beaten eggs, Four teaspoons of wine, One dessertspoonful of flour, Four tablespoons of lard, Two tablespoons of butter, Salt to the taste.

Cut the green tops of the four heads of celery, remove the outside stalks and clean the lower parts well.

Then cut each head in half, make a batter of the eggs, wine and salt.

Have ready the lard and butter in a hot skillet; dip each head in the batter and fry nicely in the lard and butter.

Put them in a hot dish and pour melted butter over them.

MACARONI

Six ounces of macaroni, One quart of tomatoes, One pint of clear soup, One dessertspoonful of sugar, Two tablespoons of flour, Two tablespoons of butter, Six tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese.

Don’t break the macaroni up, but put it in broken pieces of suitable size into hot water and add two teaspoons of salt.

Let it boil twenty minutes, then take it off; have ready the sauce, made in the following manner:

Cook the tomatoes one hour, then strain; add the clear soup, sugar, pepper and salt; let it boil and while boiling, cream the butter and flour; stir in and let it boil until it thickens. Mix all together.

MACARONI II

A quarter of a pound of macaroni, A quarter of a pound of grated Parmesan cheese, A teaspoon of mixed mustard, Two tablespoons of butter, Half a pint of rich cream, One pint of sweet milk, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste.

Boil the macaroni until it is tender, but not broken; drain the water off and cover the saucepan to let it dry.

Boil the milk and cream together; mix the butter with a teaspoon of flour and put into the boiling milk, stirring in one direction until it thickens.

Add the mustard; put in a dish a layer of macaroni, then of cheese and of sauce and so on until the dish is filled.

Put in the salt and pepper just before taking the sauce off the fire.

Bake half an hour.

MACARONI III

Six ounces of macaroni, A quarter of a pound of butter, A coffee cup full of cream, Five tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese, Two teaspoons of mixed mustard, Salt and cayenne pepper to the taste, Two eggs.

Boil the macaroni until perfectly tender; boil the cream and butter together and stir in the eggs until the mixture thickens.

Add the mustard, salt and cayenne pepper; put the dish that this is to be served in over hot water and arrange in the following manner:

A layer of the macaroni, then of the sauce and one of cheese and so on until the dish is filled; serve very hot. This can be put in a baking dish and browned in the oven for twenty minutes.

If baked, sprinkle cheese generously over the top and put small pieces of butter with it.

MACARONI WITH WHITE SAUCE

Four ounces of macaroni, One pint of rich cream, One tablespoon of butter, One dessertspoonful of flour, Four tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese, Salt and pepper to the taste.

Boil the macaroni or use spaghetti, which is more delicate.

Have the sauce made in the following manner:

Boil the cream, put in the salt, pepper and extract of celery to the taste.

Let this continue to boil and while boiling, rub the butter and flour and stir in the cream until it thickens.

Arrange the macaroni and cheese in layers in the dish and pour the sauce over immediately.

This quantity will make enough for twice, so only serve half of it at the time.

MACARONI SAUCE II

One pound of veal, Half a pound of chopped ham, One dessertspoonful of whole allspice, One teaspoon whole cloves, One small carrot, one small onion, Six bay leaves, one can of tomatoes, One fourth of a pint of sherry wine, Two tablespoons of butter.

Have cold boiled ham, scrape the carrot, peel the onion and put into a saucepan, with allspice, cloves, bay leaves, tomatoes, salt and black pepper to the taste and a little mace.

Let all boil until done, stirring carefully all the time.

Strain, thicken the sauce by rubbing a dessertspoonful of flour with the butter; stir in and let it simmer until the consistency of custard.

Heat the wine and pour into the sauce.

Boil the macaroni twenty minutes, arrange in the dish a layer of macaroni, one of grated parmesan cheese, then pour over some of the sauce.

Now another layer of macaroni, etc., having the last a layer of cheese.

Serve while hot.

TO STEW ONIONS WITH CREAM

Six Spanish onions, Three teaspoons of butter, One dessertspoonful of flour, Half a pint of cream, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Boil the onions steadily, but not too rapidly, for two hours and a half, changing the water three times.

Drain, put them into a saucepan with the cream and let them simmer very gently.

Rub the flour and butter, stir in the onions, until the cream is quite thick; add salt and black pepper. Serve immediately.

Put the onions in the dish first and pour the sauce over them.

BOILED ONIONS

Time for young onions, sixty minutes, For old onions, an hour and a quarter.

Take off the outer layers until you get to the crisp skin.

Put them on in a plenty of boiling water and a little salt.

Let them cook steadily, but not too rapidly, according to the above directions.

Pour off the water, add a teacup full of milk to a medium-sized dish of onions, a tablespoon of butter and a teaspoon of flour.

Simmer for five minutes and serve.

TO COOK BURR ARTICHOKES

Get them young or they will not be tender.

Wash them in salted water; then put them on in boiling water.

Boil until you can pull off each leaf easily.

Sprinkle a little salt over them; serve with drawn butter flavored with a little vinegar; or with a tartare sauce. Eat by dipping each leaf in the sauce.

TO BOIL TURNIPS

Eight large white turnips, One cookingspoonful of butter, Two tablespoons of cream, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Wash, peel and slice the turnips; put them into a saucepan with boiling water and let them boil steadily until they are tender enough to be pressed through a sieve, which will take over an hour.

Return to the saucepan, put in the butter, cream, salt and black pepper; stir well over a bright fire for twelve minutes and serve very hot with boiled mutton.

TURNIPS WITH WHITE SAUCE

Four large turnips, One pint of sweet milk, One tablespoon of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Peel the turnips, cut first in strips, then in dice.

Cover with hot water and let them cook until tender, which will take about an hour.

Have ready the boiled milk.

Drain the turnips and pour the boiled milk over them and return to the fire.

Rub the butter and flour together and stir in the turnips, until the milk thickens; add the salt and pepper and serve.

TURNIPS WITH BROWN SAUCE

Four good sized turnips, One coffee cup full of clear soup, One cooking-spoonful of butter, Salt and black pepper to the taste, One teaspoon of flour.

Peel the turnips, then cut into strips and afterwards in dice.

Put them into a saucepan, cover with boiling water and simmer until half done, which will take about half an hour.

Drain and put them into a skillet with the cookingspoonful of butter and fry a nice brown.

Heat the clear soup, pour over the turnips and simmer five minutes.

While simmering, rub the teaspoon of flour with the dessertspoonful of butter, stir in and when the soup is the consistency of custard, pour into a heated dish with a cover to it and serve.

TO STEW SALSIFY

Several bunches of salsify, Half a pint of sweet milk, One tablespoon of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

Scrape the salsify and cut in pieces one inch long.

Let them stand in cold water for twenty minutes, then put into a pot with a teaspoon of salt and boiling water enough to cover well.

Cook until tender, which will take about two hours.

Drain off the water, except a teacup full, which put into a saucepan with the milk ; and when it comes to a boil, rub the flour and butter together and stir in until it thickens.

Season to the taste, pour over the salsify and let it boil up once. This sauce will do for about a quart of cut up salsify.

SALSIFY FRITTERS

One quart of well boiled salsify, One dessertspoonful of butter, Two teaspoons of flour.

Mash the salsify as smooth as you can mash it.

Add the flour and butter and a little salt and black pepper, make into small cakes, dip into egg and fine breadcrumbs.

Drop in boiling lard, frying a nice brown as you would fritters, or simply dredge the cakes with flour and fry as you would a flannel cake, only using more lard.

TO BAKE SALSIFY

One quart of well-boiled salsify, Two tablespoons of butter, A half a teacup full of cream, Two tablespoons of breadcrumbs, Salt and black pepper to the taste.

The salsify must be boiled so as it will mash perfectly smooth, then measure.

Mix the breadcrumbs with it, add the butter and cream, then the salt and pepper.

Bake twenty minutes.

The breadcrumbs must be grated and sifted. Put some on the top, with a few small pieces of butter.

TO BOIL PARSNIPS

Eight large parsnips, One tablespoon of salt, One gallon of water.

If the parsnips are young and not very large, scrape them and put them into a saucepan with the water boiling and salt in it.

Boil until tender, which will take about an hour.

If they are old and large, peel thinly with a sharp knife and boil for an hour and a half.

Drain, put into a hot vegetable dish and serve with butter, black pepper and salt put on them.

If to be fried, boil as above, slice lengthwise, fry in boiling lard and butter; brown each side; drain, put in a hot dish and put butter and black pepper on them.

They are very nice served with roast beef or mutton.

PARSNIP FRITTERS

Five large parsnips, One large tablespoon of flour, One teaspoon of brown sugar, One tablespoon of butter, Black pepper, salt to the taste, Two eggs.

Scrape and cut the carrots, put them into a saucepan with a teaspoon of salt and two quarts of boiling water.

Boil until perfectly tender, then mash smooth; add the other ingredients, lastly the eggs.

Make into round cakes and fry a nice brown on both sides.

PARSNIP FRITTERS II

Six good sized parsnips, One teaspoon of flour, One tablespoon of butter, One egg.

Boil the parsnips for an hour and a half.

Skin and mash very fine, add the flour, the well beaten egg and salt to the taste.

Shape into small round cakes, sprinkling a pinch of sugar over each cake.

Put some lard and butter into a hot skillet, put in the cakes and when nicely fried on each side, serve.

TO STEW PUMPKIN

Peel the pumpkin, take out the seeds and cut into small pieces

Put into a pot, with water enough to keep it from sticking.

Simmer for three hours and when nearly done, take off the cover to allow some of the water to evaporate.

This is delicious either as a vegetable, for puddings, or for corn bread. When perfectly done drain through a sieve.

TO BAKE PUMPKINS

Three pints of stewed pumpkin, One teacup full of cream, One tablespoon of cornstarch, Salt to the taste.

Drain the pumpkin through a sieve and add to it the cream, cornstarch and salt.

Put into a baking dish and bake slowly for three-quarters of an hour.

In place of the cream and cornstarch a coffee cup full of mashed sweet potatoes, mixed well with the pumpkin and baked half an hour, is very nice.

HOMINY FRITTERS

Two teacup fulls of boiled hominy, One teacup full of sweet milk, Four tablespoon of flour, Half a teaspoon of baking powder, Salt to the taste, One egg.

The hominy must be well boiled and cold.

Mash well with a spoon; stir in the flour and milk alternately, with the well beaten yolk of the egg, then put in salt to the taste.

Sprinkle the baking powder lightly through, lastly the white of the egg beaten to a froth. Fry in boiling lard, as you would fritters.

TO BOIL HOMINY

One quart of hominy, Two quarts of water, One teaspoon of salt.

Wash well in two or three waters, rubbing the grains well with the hands, so as to whiten them.

Soak overnight and boil in the same water, from four to six hours, according to the size of the grains.

Put the salt in the water in the morning and add boiling water continually, so as to keep it an inch above the hominy while boiling.

After boiling the time required, press a grain with the fingers and if it is soft, it is done.

Drain through a colander and keep where it will not get musty.

This quantity will do for two or three times.

When heating it over, put it in a saucepan with a little milk and after it has simmered for about twenty minutes, rub a little butter and flour together, which must be according to the quantity of milk and stir in until it thickens.

HOMINY PUFFS

One quart of cold boiled hominy, Four heaping tablespoons of flour, Three teaspoons of baking powder, One coffee cup full of sweet milk, One teaspoon of salt, Four eggs.

The hominy must be thoroughly cooked and when cold stir in the well-beaten yolks of the eggs.

Then blend in the flour, milk and salt in alternation with the baking powder

Lastly the whites of the eggs beaten to a froth and stirred slowly in.

Have the lard boiling and drop in with a spoon and fry a nice brown.

Cold boiled corn grits can be used in the place of hominy.

PUDDINGS AND PIES

TO PREPARE APPLES FOR PIES

One quart of stewed apples, Yolks of four eggs, Two tablespoons of butter, Four tablespoons of sugar, Juice and grated rind of one lemon.

Measure the apples after being stewed and rubbed through a sieve.

Add the eggs, butter melted and sugar; lastly, the juice and rind of the lemon.

Put into a saucepan over boiling water and stir until quite thick.

When cold put into the pies.

TO PREPARE APPLES FOR PIES II

Three pints of stewed apples, A quarter of a pound of butter, Sugar and nutmeg to the taste, Yolks of two eggs.

Mash the apples and add the well-beaten eggs, then the sugar and nutmeg.

Cook in a saucepan, placed over hot water.

Stir until it thickens.

When cold, put in the pie plates, lined with well-made pastry.

Lemon juice can be used to flavor, instead of nutmeg.

TO PREPARE APPLES FOR PIES III

One quart of stewed apples, Yellows of four eggs, Two lemons, A large cooking- spoonful of butter, Sugar to the taste.

Beat the eggs and stir into the apples.

Add the melted butter and sugar to the taste.

Add the juice of one of the lemons and grated rind of two.

Put into a saucepan, with hot water underneath and stir until it thickens

Let it get cool, then put into plates lined with nice pastry and bake quickly.

The whites can be beaten and put over the tops of the pies and browned in the oven.

The above quantity will make three large pies.

A CHARLOTTE OF APPLES (Pudding)

Three pounds of apples, Three-quarters of a pound of sugar, Six ounces of butter, Essence of lemon or vanilla to the taste. The apples should be pared, cored and quartered, be- fore weighed.

Put them in a saucepan with the above ingredients, except the essence and let them simmer until perfectly smooth, stirring well all the time to keep from burning. When cool, add the essence and pour into the crust.

TO MAKE THE CRUST

Butter a plain mold and line it with slices of stale bread, having previously trimmed off the crust and dipped them in melted butter.

Cut the slices so as to fit with great exactness in the mold.

Pour in the apples, cover the top with breadcrumbs, small pieces of butter and a little sugar.

If a small mold, bake in a brisk oven for three quarters of an hour.

If a large mold, bake an hour.

APPLE CHARLOTTE II

One dozen and a half pippin apples, Two large cookingspoonfuls of butter, One dessertspoonful of ground cinnamon, The grated rind and juice of one lemon, Half a teaspoon of grated nutmeg, Pulverized sugar to the taste.

Peel, core and chop the apples, put them with the above ingredients into a saucepan, with hot water underneath and stew until smooth.

Butter some slices of bread and line a mold with them, as you would for Charlotte russe.

Fill it with the apples and cover the top with more slices of buttered bread.

Bake in a moderate oven until a rich brown and eat with or without sauce.

It will be better to butter both sides of the slices of bread for the top of the Charlotte.

A DELICIOUS WAY TO BAKE APPLES

A quarter of a box of gelatin. A few small pieces of stick cinnamon Some apples, Sugar to the taste.

Peel and core the apples, put them into a baking dish and fill each apple with granulated sugar.

Cover them with hot water and let them stew gently; and, while stewing, lay a few small pieces of stick cinnamon on top.

When the apples are half done, sprinkle over them the quarter of a box of gelatin and let them stew until done.

Put them in a dish and pour the juice over them.

Let them get cold.

They can be eaten with or without cream. A few pieces of lemon peel put in with the cinnamon is a great improvement.

Take them out, also the pieces of cinnamon, before pouring the juice over the apples.

TO FRY APPLES

Two pints of apples, One teacup full of brown sugar, Half a teacup full of butter.

Peel and seed the apples and slice as you would for preserves.

Have the skillet hot, put in a dessertspoonful of lard and when melted add one-half of the butter.

Now put in one-half of the apples, in a few minutes turn and when nearly done, put in one-half of the sugar.

When they look clear and like a peach preserve, take off and put in a dish over hot water.

Do the rest the same way. Turn them carefully, but do not stir them.

BAKED APPLE PUDDING

Six large apples, Four tablespoons of butter, One lemon, One egg.

Cream the butter and sugar together; mix with them the well-beaten yolks.

Then add peeled and grated apples, juice and half the grated rind of the lemon; nutmeg to the taste and lastly, the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth.

Bake half a hour and serve either with a hot sauce or cream.

APPLE PUDDING II

Half a pound of butter, One lemon, Six eggs.

Grate as many apples as will fill an ordinary sized pudding dish

Stir in the well-beaten yolks of the eggs, melted butter, juice, grated rind of the lemon and sugar to the taste.

Put this into a saucepan with no water underneath and stir for five minutes, after it begins to simmer; let this cool.

Put into a dish lined with nice pastry and cover the top also with pastry.

Bake until a light brown.

TAPIOCA AND APPLES

Take a pint of tapioca, pour some hot water over it and continue to add more hot water to it until it swells.

Peel and core some juicy apples, fill each hole with granulated sugar and sprinkle sugar freely over the apples.

When the tapioca is perfectly soft, put in extract of lemon and sugar to the taste, with a little salt. Pour it over the apples and bake slowly for two hours.

Tapioca should be put to soak before breakfast. Serve with cream.

MERINGUED APPLES

Eight large pippin apples, Some granulated sugar, Three large lemons.

Peel and core the apples and put them into a deep baking dish.

Fill each core with sugar; strain the lemon juice on, put half a pint of water in the dish and the thinly shaved rind of one lemon, cut into small pieces and scattered through.

Put the dish into a moderate oven and cook the apples until they are perfectly tender.

Take them out and let them get perfectly cold.

Prepare some icing, adding to it lemon juice to the taste; spread some thickly on each apple and brown in a moderate oven.

This makes a very nice simple dessert.

PASTRY

One pound of the best flour, Three-quarters of a pound of butter, A wine glass of ice water, The whites of two eggs.

Take three-quarters of a pound of the flour and put in a bowl; put the other quarter of a pound in a plate.

Beat the whites of the eggs very light and mix in the flour, with the wine glass of ice water, so as to make a stiff dough.

Beat well with a rolling pin for ten minutes, roll, adding the butter in four rollings and the quarter of a pound of flour.

Put the pastry on the ice for two hours.

This quantity will make three large pies.

PUFF PASTE

One pound of butter, One pound and a half of flour, Half a pint of ice water.

Wash the butter in cold water, then carefully squeeze out all the water.

Divide in about six parts; separate the flour, leaving half a pound to sprinkle with.

Take the pound of flour and one piece of the butter and mix with the ice water, using a knife for mixing and handle as little as possible.

Roll the paste from you and spread with the butter and half a pound of flour in, three rollings.

Put in a cool place for an hour or two. In the summer put it in the ice chest.

When making out into pies, cut off only enough to make one pie at the time, so as not to roll more than once after taking off of the ice.

WASHINGTON PIE

One cup of granulated sugar, Half a cup of butter, Half a cup of milk, One egg, Two cups of flour, One teaspoon of cream of tartar, Half a teaspoon of soda.

Cream the sugar and butter, add the flour, milk and well beaten egg, cream of tartar and soda; flavor delicately with vanilla.

Put in two round tins, about an inch deep and bake in a moderately quick oven.

CREAM FOR WASHINGTON PIE

One tablespoon of flour or cornstarch, One-third of a cup of granulated sugar, One cup of milk, One egg.

Put the milk on to boil, add the sugar, egg and corn starch; stir until it thickens and flavor with vanilla.

Cut the cake in two and when the cream is cold, not stiff, spread it on one-half of the cake.

Put back the other half, making two layers for each cake.

A little grated coconut can be sprinkled over the cream before putting the cake on it.

This must be served cold.

LEMON PIES

Two teacup fulls of granulated sugar, One tablespoon of butter, One teacup full of cream, One tablespoon of cornstarch, Juice and grated rind of three lemons, Six eggs.

Beat the eggs separately, then together; add the sugar, butter, cream, juice and grated rind of the lemons; lastly, the cornstarch.

Stir over the fire until it thickens and when perfectly cold, pour into pie plates lined with pastry.

ORANGE PIE

Three-quarters of a cup full of sugar, Two tablespoons and a half of butter, Juice and grated rind of one orange, One dessertspoonful of corn starch, Three eggs.

Beat the sugar and butter, then the well-beaten yolks of the eggs, the juice and grated rind of the orange, nutmeg and cornstarch.

Lastly, the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Put into a saucepan with hot water underneath and stir until thick and perfectly smooth. Line the plates with pastry and when cool pour into the plates and bake quickly.

BREAD FRITTERS

One quart of sweet milk, Two teacup fulls of breadcrumbs, One teaspoon of soda, Two teaspoons of cream of tartar, Nutmeg and salt to the taste, Two tablespoons of granulated sugar, Two eggs.

Boil the milk and soak the bread crumbs in it for ten minutes, in a covered bowl.

Beat until smooth; add the well-beaten yolks of the eggs, then the salt, nutmeg, soda and cream of tartar dissolved in a little hot water.

Lastly the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth.

Serve with butter and sugar, or maple molasses.

BELL FRITTERS

One pint of water, Two tablespoons of butter, One pint of flour, Six eggs, one pint of lard.

Put the butter into a pint of water; let it boil a few minutes, thicken it very smoothly with a pint of flour ; let it remain a short time on the fire, stirring it all the time, that it may not stick to the pan.

Pour it into a wooden bowl; add six eggs, breaking one and beating it in, then another and so on, until they are all in and the dough is quite light.

Put a pint of lard into a pan, let it boil; drop the fritters in, have them round like bells and fry a light brown.

Salt to the taste.

SPANISH FRITTERS

One loaf of bakers’ bread, A tablespoon of pulverized sugar, One teacup full of cream, Nutmeg and cinnamon to the taste. One egg.

Take off the crust and cut the inside of the loaf in pieces three inches square and one inch thick.

Put the sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon and well-beaten egg in the cream.

Soak the bread well in it and fry in butter a nice brown.

Serve with a hot sauce.

FRENCH FRITTERS

One quart of boiled milk, Flour enough for a stiff batter, One tablespoon of butter, Salt to the taste. Four eggs.

Beat the milk and flour together until a stiff batter is made.

Add the salt, melted butter and well-beaten yolks of the eggs.

Beat the whites very light and stir in gradually.

Have the lard boiling and drop in a cooking-spoonful at the time, which is enough for one fritter.

Serve with golden syrup.

BLANC MANGE

Three pints of new milk, One ounce of gelatin, Sugar and vanilla to taste.

Put one quart of milk in the saucepan with the gelatin and boil until it is thoroughly dissolved.

Add the other pint with the sugar and let it boil once more, strain and set it aside to cool.

When it begins to congeal, flavor with vanilla to the taste and then mold. Any other extract that may be preferred can be used.

BLANC MANGE II

One ounce of Cox’s gelatin, One pint of rich cream, Extract of vanilla and sugar to taste.

Pour enough hot water over the gelatin to cover it and when it is thoroughly dissolved, let it boil slowly for half an hour.

Sweeten and flavor the cream, strain the gelatin into it and let it boil up once gently, then strain again into a mold, which has been previously dipped in cold water.

SNOW PUDDING

One ounce of gelatin, One pint of cold water, Whites of three eggs, Sugar to the taste, Three lemons

Soak the gelatin in the water for fifteen minutes, put it into a saucepan with hot water underneath and when thoroughly dissolved take it off of the fire.

Let it cool, then beat to a stiff froth with an eggbeater.

Sweeten to the taste and add the juice of the three lemons.

Pour into a mold and put it into a cool place to get stiff.

Serve with a custard to be made for it.

TO MAKE THE CUSTARD FOR SNOW PUDDING

One quart of sweet milk, Three tablespoons of sugar, A dessertspoonful of cornstarch, The grated rind of one lemon, The yolks of three eggs.

Boil the milk, add the yolks slowly, stirring all the time to keep from curdling. This custard should be boiled in a saucepan with hot water underneath.

Then put in the sugar, grated rind of the lemon and lastly the cornstarch.

Stir until it thickens and when perfectly cold serve with the pudding.

ANOTHER RECIPE FOR SNOW PUDDING

Half a box of Cox’s gelatin, One pint of boiling water, One teacup full of pulverized sugar, Whites of five eggs, Juice of one lemon.

Dissolve the gelatin in the boiling water, add the lemon juice after straining it, then the sugar.

When cool, stir in the well-beaten whites of the eggs and beat until it gets very thick, then mold and serve with a custard made of the yolks of the eggs and flavored with lemon.

IRISH POTATO DUMPLING

One pint of mashed potatoes, One teaspoon of baking powder, One tablespoon of lard and butter, One saltspoonful of salt, Flour enough for a stiff dough.

Rub the potatoes through the sieve, so as to have it entirely free from lumps.

Add the butter and. lard, half and half, then the salt, sift the baking powder into half a pint of flour and with some milk mix with the potato, then add more flour, so as to make the dough quite stiff.

Roll with any kind of fruit, have a floured cloth ready and tie the dumpling in it.

Put it in a pot of boiling water and boil two hours.

Keep the pot well filled with boiling water and serve with either a hot or cold sauce.

IRISH POTATO PUDDING

One pint of mashed potato, One tablespoon of butter, One pint of cream, Granulated sugar to the taste, Juice and rind of one lemon, Four eggs.

Rub the potato through a sieve before measuring; stir in the cream and well beaten yellows of the eggs, with the melted butter, sugar, rind and juice of the lemon.

Mix thoroughly and add the well beaten whites.

Bake half an hour in a pudding dish.

Serve with a hot or cold sauce.

This can also be baked in pastry.

SWEET POTATO PIE

Two pounds of boiled, mashed sweet potatoes, One pound of sugar, one pound of butter, Two tablespoons of wine, two of brandy, One tablespoon of rose water, One pint of rich, sweet cream.

Cream the butter and sugar together.

Boil and mash the sweet potatoes; beat them by degrees into the sugar and butter; add five well beaten eggs; then the wine, brandy and rose water mixed; lastly the cream.

Line your pie plates with some nice well-made pastry.

Fill them with the potato and bake until a nice brown.

SWEET POTATO PUDDING

Half a pound of mashed sweet potato, Half a pound of butter, Half a pint of cream, One wineglassful of wine, Half a wineglassful of brandy or whiskey, Essence of lemon to the taste, Granulated sugar to the taste, Three eggs.

Stir the cream, in the potato and butter melted.

Beat the yellows of the eggs and add, with the wine, brandy, lemon and sugar.

Stir well and mix in gradually the well beaten whites of the eggs.

Bake half an hour and serve with hot or cold sauce.

This will be nicer put in a pudding dish lined with pastry and a layer of it on the top.

SWEET POTATO PUDDING II

One pound of mashed sweet potatoes, Half a coffee cup full of butter, One teacup full of sugar, Half a grated nutmeg, Juice and grated rind of one lemon, One glass of brandy or sherry wine, Four eggs beaten separately.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the yolks of the eggs, spice, lemon and wine or brandy.

Then beat in the potato slowly; stir in the well beaten whites of the eggs and bake in a buttered dish half an hour.

Eat with a hot sauce.

This can be baked with an under crust of pastry, if preferred.

BROWN BETTY

Two cup fulls of chopped apples, One cup full of breadcrumbs, Half a cup full of brown sugar, One teaspoon of ground cinnamon, Two tablespoons of butter.

Have a deep dish; first put in a layer of chopped apples, tart ones; then some of the brown sugar, cinnamon and breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter; then another layer of apples and so on until the dish is full, having the last layer, of breadcrumbs and small pieces of butter.

Steam three-quarters of an hour, by putting the dish in a pan of hot water and a cover over it; then uncover and bake until well browned.

Eat either with sugar and cream, or a hot sauce.

Use a coffee cup for measuring.

PANCAKES

One quart of sweet milk, One small nutmeg, Half a pound of flour, One pound of melted butter, One pound of sugar, Two tablespoons of wine, Sixteen eggs.

Beat the yolks very light, add to them the quart of milk, grated nutmeg, flour and melted butter; beat well for a while, so as to have the flour free from lumps.

Add the sugar and wine, lastly the well beaten whites.

Butter the pan, run the pancakes as thin as possible and when colored, they are done.

Do not turn them, but lay each one carefully in the dish, sprinkling powdered sugar, spreading a little butter between each layer.

Have about six pancakes in each plate.

Serve hot.

Half of this quantity will do for a family of six.

SILVER CAKE PUDDING

Two cups and a half of flour, Half a cup of butter, Two cups of granulated sugar, Half a cup of sweet milk, Half a teaspoon of soda, One teaspoon of cream of tartar, Whites of six eggs.

Cream the sugar and butter together, add milk and flour alternately.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a froth and stir in slowly.

Flavor with vanilla and just before baking, put in the soda and cream of tartar, with milk enough to mix.

Have the oven well heated and bake nearly an hour.

SAUCE

Half a pound of butter, Half a pound of granulated sugar, Yolks of two eggs, Grated rind and juice of a lemon, One wineglass of wine.

Cream the butter, add the sugar, egg, juice and rind of the lemon, lastly the wine.

When thoroughly mixed, stir over the fire till it comes to a good boil.

GINGER CAKE PUDDING

One coffee cup full of molasses, One coffee cup full of brown sugar, One pint and a half of flour, One tablespoon of ground ginger and cinnamon, One teacup full of sweet milk, One teaspoon of vinegar, One teaspoon of soda, One teacup full of butter, Four eggs.

Beat the butter and sugar together, then add the well-beaten yolks of the eggs.

Sift in the flour and spices, mix the soda and vinegar in the milk and stir in the mixture.

Add by degrees the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Bake one hour and a half.

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING

Two coffee cupsful of Indian meal, One coffee cup full of molasses, A large cooking-spoonful of butter, Milk enough for a batter.

Scald one cup of the meal with a little hot water.

Add the other cup not scalded, the molasses and butter.

Thin with the milk and bake three hours in a slow oven.

BOILED INDIAN PUDDING*

Three coffee cupsful of buttermilk, Half a teaspoon of soda, two eggs, sugar and nutmeg to the taste.

Beat the soda in the buttermilk and stir in Indian Meal** enough to make a thick batter.

Add sugar and nutmeg to the taste; and lastly, the well beaten eggs.

Boil in a bag one hour and a half and eat with a hot sauce.

*Also called “Hasty Pudding” **Corn meal or maize meal

RICE PUDDING

One quarter of a pound of rice, One quart of rich milk, One quarter of a pound of sugar, One teaspoon of powdered cinnamon.

Wash the rice through three waters and pick it carefully.

Stir in the milk, sugar and cinnamon.

Put into a pudding dish and bake slowly for two hours.

RICE PUDDING II

Two quarts of milk, One teacup full of raw rice, One teacup full of granulated sugar, Cinnamon and nutmeg to the taste, A dessertspoonful of butter.

Mix thoroughly and bake in a slow oven for two hours and a half.

To be eaten hot.

RICE PUDDING III

One coffee cup full of raw rice, Eight tablespoons of granulated sugar, Two tablespoons of butter, Two quarts of sweet milk, One saltspoonful of salt.

Wash the rice through several waters, rubbing it well with the hands while washing it, which makes it much whiter.

Let it soak in a pint of the milk for one hour, then pour over the remainder of the milk and let it boil for an hour.

Add the sugar and salt and some grated nutmeg to the taste, or ground cinnamon.

Pour into a pudding dish and bake one hour in a slow oven.

RICE AND CREAM PUDDING

Four tablespoons of rice, One pint of sweet milk, One pint of rich cream, Two tablespoons of Cox’s gelatin, Sugar and vanilla to the taste.

Dissolve the gelatin in a little hot water.

Boil the rice in the pint of milk until it is perfectly soft, then stir in the gelatin.

Sweeten to the taste. Add the vanilla.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and stir slowly in.

Serve with cream.

COTTAGE PUDDING

One pint of the best flour, One teacup full of pulverized sugar, Two tablespoons and a half of butter, Two teaspoons of cream of tartar, One teaspoon of soda, One teacup full of sweet milk Nutmeg to the taste, One well-beaten egg.

Warm the butter and stir in the sugar and egg.

Put the cream of tartar in the flour and after dissolving the soda in the milk, add to the flour.

Flavor with the nutmeg, or lemon, to the taste.Bake three-quarters of an hour in a slow oven. Serve with a hot sauce.

SUET PUDDING

One teacup full of chopped suet, One teacup full of molasses, One teacup full of sweet milk, Three teacup fulls and a half of flour, One teaspoon of soda, Two teaspoons of cream of tartar, Half a teaspoon of ground cloves, One teacup full of raisins and currants mixed.

Chop the suet as fine as possible and mix well with the milk and molasses.

Sift in the flour and cloves.

Dredge the currants and raisins with flour and add.

Lastly, the cream of tartar and soda, mixed with a little milk.

Steam three hours and serve with a hot sauce.

Butter can be used instead of suet; in that case, put in two-thirds of a teacup full.

YANKEE CAKE PUDDING

One pint of flour, One coffee cup full of sweet milk, Two teacupsful of granulated sugar, One teaspoon of cream of tartar, Half a teaspoon of soda, One large cooking-spoonful of butter One egg.

Beat the butter and sugar together until very light; then add the flour and milk in alternation, with the extract of lemon or vanilla to the taste.

Lastly, mix the cream of tartar and soda in a tablespoon of milk and stir in the mixture.

Bake in a slow oven.

Serve with a hot or cold sauce.

ROLY POLY PUDDING

One quart of milk, Yolks of three eggs, One coffee cup full of sugar, A dessertspoonful of butter, A quarter of a pound of seeded raisins, A quarter of a pound of blanched almonds, A quarter of a pound of figs, A piece of citron three inches square, Vanilla to the taste.

Boil the milk, beat the eggs and sugar together and pour the milk over them.

Put in the butter and vanilla and stir over the fire until it thickens.

Cut the fruit and almonds in small pieces and put into the custard.

Have ready a sponge cake, that has been baked in a large stove pan; spread the mixture over the cake while both are hot.

Roll and serve with a hot sauce.

FEATHER CAKE PUDDING

One coffee cup full of white sugar, Half a coffee cup full of milk, One tablespoon of butter, One coffee cup full and a half of flour, One teaspoon of baking powder, Flavor with vanilla or lemon to taste, One egg.

Cream the sugar and butter, add the well-beaten yolk of the egg, then the flour and milk alternately.

Stir in the melted butter, then the flavoring and white of the egg beaten very light.

Lastly, sift in the baking powder.

Bake in a quick oven and serve with a hot sauce.

MERINGUE PUDDING

One pint of stale breadcrumbs, One quart of sweet milk, One cup full of granulated sugar, The juice and grated rind of one lemon, The yolks of four eggs.

Mix the breadcrumbs and milk, then the well- beaten yolks, sugar, juice and grated rind of the lemon.

Bake half an hour.

When cold, spread the top with any kind of fruit jelly.

Beat the whites of five eggs to a froth, adding by degrees two tablespoons of pulverized sugar and the juice of one lemon.

Spread this over the pudding, put it in the oven and brown nicely.

Top with cream.

FIG PUDDING

One pound of fresh figs, Half a pound of brown sugar, One pound of breadcrumbs, One pound of beef suet, Four eggs.

Soak the figs for about ten minutes in hot water. Drain and chop very fine and mix well with the sugar and suet.

Then the well-beaten yolks and the bread crumbs

Lastly the whites of the eggs beaten stiff.

Put into a mold and steam, or boil, three hours.

Eat with a hot sauce.

COCONUT PUDDING

One teacup full of desiccated cocoanut, One quart of sweet milk, Two tablespoons of cornstarch, One tablespoon of butter, Sugar and nutmeg to the taste, Three eggs.

Boil one pint of the milk and soak the coconut in it for half an hour.

Put it into a saucepan and as soon as it boils, add the remainder of the milk, yolks of the eggs, sugar, nutmeg; lastly, the cornstarch.

Stir until it thickens, then put into a pudding dish and bake quickly for fifteen minutes.

Beat the whites of the eggs until stiff, add a tablespoon of granulated sugar, cover the top of the pudding with it and brown nicely.

ORANGE PUDDING

One quart of sweet milk, Yolks of three eggs, One coflee cup full of sugar, Four tablespoons of cornstarch, Five large oranges, Juice and grated rind of two lemons.

Boil the milk and, while boiling, stir in the well beaten yolks of the eggs and the cornstarch, previously mixed with a little water.

Boil fifteen minutes, stirring all the time to keep from curdling.

When cool, add the lemon juice and grated rind.

Peel, seed and slice the oranges; put them in layers in a dish and pour the custard over them.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add two tablespoons of pulverized sugar to them, spread over the pudding and serve with cream, or without it.

LEMON PUDDING

Two coffee cupsful of grated breadcrumbs, Three coffee cupsful of sweet milk, The juice and grated rind of two lemons, One large cookingspoonful of butter, One coffee cup full and a half of sugar, Five eggs.

Scald the milk and stir in the breadcrumbs and butter; let it boil, take off the fire and put it away to cool for half an hour.

Beat the yolks very light and stir in the mixture, alternately with the sugar.

Boil for five minutes and when cool pour into the plates lined with pastry.

Beat the whites of the eggs very stiff, add slowly two tablespoons of granulated sugar and spread over the puddings after they are baked. Then put in the oven and brown.

TRANSPARENT PUDDING

Half a pound of butter, Half a pound of granulated sugar, One dessertspoonful of cornstarch, Grated nutmeg to the taste, Six eggs.

Cream the butter and sugar and add the well beaten yolks.

Beat the whites to a froth and stir in gently, then the nutmeg.

Lastly, sift in the cornstarch.

Put into a buttered pudding dish and bake in a quick oven half an hour.

Serve with a hot sauce.

A SIMPLE PUDDING

Half a cup full of butter, One cup of molasses, One cupl of sweet milk, Three and a half cups of flour, Two teacupsful of cream of tartar, One teaspoon of soda, A cup full of seeded raisins.

Mix the milk and flour, then the molasses, melted butter and raisins.

Lastly the cream of tartar and soda, dissolved in a little milk.

Steam for three hours and serve with a hot sauce.

Be sure to flour the raisins before putting them in the pudding.

Use a coffee cup for measuring.

A BOILED BREAD PUDDING

Half a pint of breadcrumbs, Half a pint of scalded milk, Three tablespoons of sugar, Half a pound of dried currants, One ounce of blanched almonds, Two ounces of citron, Two tablespoons of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Orange flower water to the taste, Five eggs.

Pour the scalded milk on the breadcrumbs and cover for an hour.

Beat the eggs light and add to the bread, the flour, butter, sugar, currants and almonds that have been pounded as well as blanched.

Lastly, the orange flower water to the taste.

Butter a covered mold, add mixture and boil steadily one hour.

Eat with either hot or cold sauce.

BOILED BREAD PUDDING II

Half a pint of breadcrumbs, Half a pint of scalded milk, One teaspoon of flour, One ounce of butter, Two ounces of sugar, Half a pound of currants, Flavor with extract of lemon to the taste, Four eggs.

Pour the milk over the breadcrumbs and cover for an hour.

Beat up the eggs until light, stir in the flour, then add to the breadcrumbs.

Wash, pick and dry the currants, flour them and with the sugar, stir into the mixture.

Lastly, add the extract.

Flour a cloth, put in the pudding, tie it tight and boil for one hour.

Serve with a hot sauce.

BAKED BREAD PUDDING

One quart of sweet milk, Two coffee cupsful of stale bread, Two tablespoons of butter, One teaspoon of baking powder, Three tablespoons of sugar, Four eggs.

Soften the breadcrumbs with the milk, stir in the well- beaten yolks of the eggs, then melted butter, sugar and nutmeg to the taste.

Beat the whites of the eggs very light and mix through.

Lastly, sift in the baking powder.

Have a moderately heated oven and bake one hour.

If preferred, this pudding can be put in a mold or bag and boiled two hours.

Serve with a hot sauce.

BAKED BREAD PUDDING II

One pint of stale breadcrumbs, Three sticks of cinnamon, One quart of milk, Grated rind of a half of a lemon, One tablespoon of butter, Sugar to the taste, Eight eggs.

Break the cinnamon into the milk and boil ten minutes.

Strain and when cold, stir in the yellows of the eggs, alternately with the sugar and breadcrumbs.

Add the lemon and if desired, a little rose water and lastly, the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Bake in a buttered dish for three-quarters of an hour.

Grate a little nutmeg over the top when done and serve either, with a hot or cold sauce.

A SIMPLE BAKED PUDDING

Half a pound of flour, One pint of sweet milk, Half a teaspoon of baking powder, One teaspoon of salt, Extract of lemon to the taste, A cooking spoonful of butter, The yolks of four eggs, The whites of two eggs, Granulated sugar to the taste.

Beat the yolks very light and stir in the flour, then the milk, melted butter, salt, sugar and extract.

Beat the whites to a froth and stir in slowly.

Lastly, the baking powder.

Peel, core and cut up six apples; put them in a buttered dish, pour the batter over and bake an hour in a moderate oven.

Any kind of fruit can be used in the same way.

NONPAREIL PUDDING

One pint of breadcrumbs, One quart of sweet milk, One coffee cup full of sugar, Grated rind of one lemon, A cookingspoonful of butter, The yolks of four eggs.

Beat the yolks of the eggs light and put in the milk.

Mix gradually with this the breadcrumbs and melted.

Add the lemon rind.

Bake in a good, but not too quick, oven.

Beat the whites of the eggs very stiff and add the pulverized sugar to them, beating until a froth.

Before putting in the sugar stir the juice of the lemon in it.

Spread over the pudding a layer of jelly, or any other sweetmeat and pour on it the whites of the eggs.

Return to the oven to brown. Serve cold with cream.

TAPIOCA PUDDING WITH COCONUT

Three tablespoons of tapioca, Three tablespoons of grated coconut, One teacup full of granulated sugar, One quart of milk, Four eggs.

Soak the tapioca overnight. In the morning pour off the water.

Let the milk come to a boil, put in the tapioca and cook ten minutes;

Beat the yolks of the eggs and sugar together until light; add to this the grated coconut and stir into the tapioca.

Boil ten minutes and pour into a pudding dish.

Beat the whites of the eggs, add to them three tablespoons of granulated sugar and spread on top of the pudding.

On top of all, spread a thick layer of coconut and brown in the oven five minutes.

PUMPKIN PUDDING

Half a pound of stewed pumpkin, A quarter of a pound of butter, A quarter of a pound of sugar, Half a pint of sweet milk, One wineglassful of wine, Nutmeg or cinnamon to the taste, Three eggs.

Mix the milk and pumpkin, add the sugar, well-beaten eggs and melted butter.

Put into a saucepan with hot water underneath and stir until it thickens.

When cool add the wine and put into plates lined with pastry.

Bake in a quick oven.

CAKE PUDDING

Two cups of sugar, One cup of butter, One cup of sweet milk, One teaspoon of baking powder, Flour enough to make it as stiff as a pound cake, Two eggs.

Beat the yellows of the eggs, mix with them the sugar, sweet milk and butter melted; then add the flour and lastly the well beaten whites of the eggs and any flavoring that may be preferred.

Bake in a moderate oven and serve with either a hot or cold sauce.

CORNSTARCH PUDDING

Four tablespoons of cornstarch, One quart of rich milk, Two tablespoons of sugar, Vanilla or lemon to the taste, Two eggs.

Mix the cornstarch with a little milk until perfectly smooth, put it in the quart of milk and beat.

Add the two well beaten eggs and when it boils stir in the sugar by degrees.

Lastly, flavor with vanilla or lemon.

Pour into a mold to get cold.

Serve with a custard sauce.

A dessertspoonful of butter stirred in after the eggs have been added, would be an improvement.

CHOCOLATE PUDDING

Twelve tablespoons of grated breadcrumbs, Six tablespoons of grated vanilla chocolate, One cookingspoonful of butter, One quart of sweet milk, Yolks of six eggs.

Boil the milk and sweeten to the taste with granulated sugar, then add the butter to it while boiling.

Cool and add the well beaten yolks of the eggs and grated chocolate.

Bake for half an hour.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, adding, while beating, two tablespoons of pulverized sugar.

Spread evenly over the pudding and brown nicely.

Eat with cream.

A CHRISTMAS PUDDING

One pound of flour, One pound of granulated sugar, One pound of currants, One pound of raisins, One pound of beef suet, Juice of two oranges, Juice of one lemon, Six eggs.

Seed the raisins, wash and pick the currants, dry them and flour both well.

Put in the flour, sugar and suet and add the juice of the oranges and lemon and grated rind of one orange.

Lastly, beat the eggs very light and stir in by degrees

Flour the pudding bag, pour in the pudding and tie loosely, to allow the pudding to swell.

Boil five hours. Serve with hot or cold sauce.

Butter can be used instead of suet and in that case use a half of a pound.

ICE PUDDING

One pint and a half of new milk, One dessertspoonful of Cox’s gelatin, Sugar and extract to the taste, Five eggs.

Boil the milk with the isinglass.

Beat the eggs and milk as you would for custard and when the milk comes to another boil, take it off.

Have a tin mold with a cover to it, buttered and lined with candied fruits.

Then pour the custard in gradually, so that the fruit will remain at the bottom.

Put the cover on and bury the mold in ice for the whole day, only turning out the pudding at the moment it is wanted.

The custard can be sweetened a little, but be careful not to put in too much sugar, on account of the fruit being sweet.

CABINET PUDDING

Half a pound of butter, Half a pound of flour, Half a pound of granulated sugar, Half a pound of seeded raisins, Half a coffee cup full of cream,

The juice and grated rind of one lemon, Five eggs.

Cream the sugar and butter together, add the well-beaten yolks, milk and flour, alternately with the whites, which have been previously beaten to a froth.

Lastly, the raisins well dredged with flour.

Turn into a well-buttered mold and boil two hours and a half.

SAUCE FOR CABINET PUDDING

Yolks of four eggs, One wineglass of wine, One tablespoon of butter, Half a teaspoon of powdered cinnamon, Juice and grated rind of half a lemon.

Cream the butter and sugar together; add the well- beaten yolks, lemon and spice, lastly the wine.

Beat ten minutes and put into a saucepan with hot water underneath, stir until it is the consistency of a thick custard.

Serve hot, with the pudding.

DUTCH PUFFS

Two cups of granulated sugar, One cup of butter, Four cup of flour. One teaspoon of baking powder, Juice and grated rind of one lemon, Yolks of eight eggs.

Beat the sugar and butter together, then add the flour and well beaten yolks of the eggs, beating all the time, so as to have the puffs very light.

Put in the juice and grated rind of the lemon, then the baking powder.

Lastly, beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and stir slowly in.

Bake in round molds and serve with a hot sauce.

Measure with a large teacup.

A SIMPLE PLUM PUDDING

One loaf of stale bread, One teacup full of stoned raisins, One teacup full of currants, One teacup full of light molasses, One teaspoon of cinnamon and cloves, mixed, One grated nutmeg.

Slice the bread very thin and pour over it a little boiling water; cover closely until thoroughly softened; mash smooth and add the raisins that have been seeded and divided.

Add the currants that have been washed, picked and floured. Also the spices.

Mix well with the hands; flour a pudding cloth, or mold; pour in the pudding and boil one hour.

Serve with a hot sauce.

POOR MAN’S PLUM PUDDING

One five-cent loaf of baker’s stale bread, One coifee cup full of stoned raisins, One coffee cup full of currants, washed and picked, One large teacup full of molasses, One tablespoon of butter, Half a teaspoon of powdered cloves, One grated nutmeg.

Slice the bread very thin, pour on it a little boiling water and cover it closely.

Let it stand until it softens.

Mash very smooth; add the molasses, fruit and butter.

Mix well and boil in a pudding cloth for an hour.

Serve with an old-fashioned hot brown sugar sauce.

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING

One pound of raisins stoned and cut in half, One pound of currants picked, washed and dried, One pound of butter; eight eggs, One pound of breadcrumbs, or a half a pound of flour, One cup of sweet milk; half a tumbler of wine, One pound of sugar; half a tumbler of brandy, One tablespoon of cinnamon and mace, mixed, One saltspoonful of salt.

Prepare all the ingredients the day before, except the eggs.

Beat the eggs very light and add half the milk, flour (or breadcrumbs if used) and the butter.

Sprinkle the fruit with flour and mix in by degrees.

Add the spices and liquor, beating very hard and stir in the remainder of the milk.

If not thick enough, add more breadcrumbs.

Dip the pudding cloth into boiling water, shake it and sprinkle the inside of it with flour.

Lay it in a deep pan, pour the mixture in the cloth; tie so as to allow the pudding to swell and boil six hours.

Turn out carefully.

Before sending to the table, have ready some blanched sweet almonds and some citron cut in slices.

Stick tastefully all over the pudding and serve with a hot or cold sauce.

This pudding will be much improved by adding some rose water, some grated orange and some lemon rinds.

MINCE MEAT

Two pounds of cooked beef, One pound of well-boiled beef tongue, One peck of pippin apples, Three pounds of seeded raisins, Two pounds of citron, Three peeled and seeded oranges, Two peeled and seeded lemons, One quart of brandy, One dozen nutmegs, Two tablespoons of rose water, Two ounces of powdered cloves, One pint of good cider, One pound of brown sugar.

Chop the meat and fruit, as fine as possible.

Add the brandy, sugar, spices and rose water.

Mix thoroughly, then stir in the cider.

Put into a stone jar and tie paper tightly over it.

SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS

WINE SAUCE FOR PUDDING

Half a pound of brown sugar Six ounces of butter, One teaspoon of flour, Four tablespoons of wine, The yolks of two eggs.

Cream the butter and sugar together and add the well- beaten yolks of the eggs.

Thicken with the flour and put the mixture on the fire.

Let it boil until the consistency of thick custard, taking care to stir well all the time it is boiling.

Just before taking it off the fire, heat the wine and stir in.

PUDDING SAUCE

One cup full of boiling water, Half a cup full of butter, Half a cup full of granulated sugar, Two wineglasses of Madeira wine, One teaspoon of cornstarch, Nutmeg to the taste.

Cream the butter and sugar; stir in the hot water.

Add the nutmeg and then the corn starch.

Put into a saucepan with hot water underneath and stir until it thickens.

Just before taking off the fire, add the wine.

This will make sauce enough for a medium-size pudding, say for a family of six.

Should the pudding be a large one, then the proportions must be doubled.

Use a coffee cup for measuring.

PUDDING SAUCE II

Two cup fulls of granulated sugar, One cup full of butter, Nutmeg and wine to the taste, The yolks of three eggs.

Cream the butter until very light; add the sugar, well- beaten eggs and nutmeg.

Put into a saucepan with hot water underneath and stir until it thickens; then put in the wine.

Serve very hot.

Use a coffee cup for measuring.

This will be sufficient for a large pudding.

PUDDING SAUCE III

Half a pound of granulated sugar, Half a pound of butter, Wine or brandy to the taste, Four eggs.

Cream the butter, add the sugar, wine or brandy to the taste and lastly the well beaten eggs.

Put into a saucepan with boiling water underneath and stir until it thickens.

Serve very hot.

PUDDING SAUCE IV

One cup full of brown sugar, One pint of boiling water, Two tablespoons of flour, Two cookingspoonsful of butter, Two wineglassfuls of wine, Nutmeg to the taste.

Put the water and sugar into a saucepan and boil for fifteen minutes, then add the butter.

Mix the flour with a little cold water until smooth and stir slowly in the boiling sugar-water until it thickens.

Add grated nutmeg to the taste.

Heat the wine and pour in.

Use a coffee cup for measuring the sugar.

HARD SAUCE FOR PUDDING

Two cupsful of powdered sugar, Half a cup full of butter, Juice and grated rind of one lemon, A teaspoon of grated nutmeg.

Cream the butter and beat in the sugar, lemon juice, grated rind and nutmeg, for about ten minutes.

A wine glass of sherry wine might be added.

Pile lightly on a pretty dish and set it away to cool.

HARD SAUCE FOR PUDDING II

Six ounces of butter, Six ounces of granulated sugar, One wineglassful of wine, A little grated nutmeg, The white of one egg.

Beat the butter and sugar very light.

Add the well-beaten white of the egg, then the wine.

Continue to beat until it is frothy, then put in the nutmeg to the taste.

Put it in the dish lightly, don’t press it down.

CREAMS and ICES

OMLETTE SOUFFLE

Four tablespoons of granulated sugar, Six tablespoons of flour, One quart of sweet milk, Twelve eggs.

Boil the milk; beat the yolks of the eggs well and mix in alternately the flour and sugar.

Stir in the boiling milk and let it stand without boiling, after the ingredients have been added to the milk.

One hour before it is to be eaten, beat the whites to a stiff froth and stir them into the mixture.

Flavor with any extract to suit the taste.

Bake in a quick oven for fifteen minutes.

CHARLOTTE RUSSE

Half a pint of sweet milk, A quarter of a pound of granulated sugar, Two pints and a half of rich cream, One teacup full of boiling water, Half a box of Cox’s gelatin, Half of a vanilla bean, Yolks of two eggs.

Put the milk on to boil, beat the eggs and stir in.

Add the sugar and vanilla bean, split and cut in small pieces and boil five minutes.

Pour the boiling water over the gelatin and let it boil up once.

Sweeten the cream to the taste, beat the cream to a stiff froth.

When the custard is cool, not cold, mix all together.

Line the molds with sponge cake and pour the mixture in.

Keep in a cool place.

Before molding take out the pieces of vanilla bean.

CHARLOTTE RUSSE II

One pint of cream, Half a box of Cox’s gelatin, Four ounces of granulated sugar, Four tablespoons of sherry, Extract of vanilla to the taste, Whites of four eggs.

Dissolve the gelatin in a teacup of milk, then scald, cool and strain.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and add the gelatin.

Then stir in the sugar, wine and vanilla, whip the cream and add slowly.

When it gets cold, put into molds that have been previously lined with sponge cake.

CHARLOTTE RUSSE III

One quarter of an ounce of gelatin, One pint of rich cream, Three heaping tablespoons of sugar, Extract of vanilla to the taste, The whites of three eggs.

Pour on the gelatin enough boiling water to dissolve it thoroughly, then cool.

Beat the cream and eggs to a froth and stir into the gelatin, alternately.

Add the sugar slowly and when well mixed, flavor with vanilla.

Pour into a mold well lined on each side with sponge cake.

CREAM FOR PUFFS

One ounce of butter, One pint of water, Four ounces of flour, Two ounces of cornstarch, Two ounces of granulated sugar, One pint of sweet milk, Yolks of two eggs.

Put the water in a saucepan over the fire, with the butter to melt.

When the water boils, beat in the flour and cook for five minutes, stirring all the time to keep from burning.

Mix together cold the cornstarch, sugar and eggs; add the milk, put it on the fire and stir until it boils five minutes.

When cool, flavor with a teaspoon of vanilla and put into the puffs.

EGG KISSES

Twelve ounces of pulverized sugar, The whites of six eggs, Vanilla to the taste. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, then beat the sugar in lightly and add the vanilla to the taste.

Drop with a tablespoon on a paper half an inch apart.

Bake on a board one inch thick, in a cool oven until the tops are a light brown. Slip a knife under and put two of each together.

CREAM MERINGUES

One pound of pulverized sugar, Whites of eight eggs, Two teaspoons of vanilla, One quart of rich cream, A small pinch of alum.

Beat the eggs to a stiff froth and add while beating, half a pound of the sugar, one teaspoon of the vanilla and the alum.

Allow a tablespoon of this for each meringue and brown in a quick oven.

Shape smoothly and handle lightly.

Whip the cream and add the other half pound of the sugar and the other teaspoon of vanilla.

When very stiff, fill the meringues.

This quantity should make seven full meringues.

APPLE CREAM

Two coffee cupsful of the pulp of baked apples, One coffee cup full of pulverized sugar, The whites of two eggs, Juice and grated rind of a lemon.

Beat the apples and sugar together.

Add the juice and rind of the lemon.

Stir in slowly the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Serve with boiled custard or whipped cream.

ITALIAN CREAM

Two tablespoons of Cox’s gelatin, One pint of sweet, rich cream, Extract of vanilla and sugar to the taste.

Pour over the gelatin enough warm water to dissolve it thoroughly.

Sweeten and flavor the cream to the taste.

Whip to a very stiff froth.

Stir in the gelatin when it is lukewarm, then mold and put in a cool place for a while.

Eat with or without cream.

SPANISH CREAM

Half a box of gelatin, One quart of sweet milk, Six tablespoons of granulated sugar Vanilla to the taste, Three eggs.

Mix all ingredients, except the egg whites, in a saucepan and allow them to boil up once.

Add the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Mold and eat cold.

BAVAROISE

Half a pound of granulated sugar, One quart of thick cream, Half a pint of water, One-third of a vanilla bean.

Put the water, sugar and bean, in a saucepan and boil until dissolved.

Sweeten the cream to the taste, beat to a stiff froth and mix with the gelatin and water.

When lukewarm, take out the vanilla bean and mold.

Serve with cream or a rich boiled custard.

FLORENCE CREAM

One pint of milk, Yolks of three eggs, One third of a vanilla bean, Three tablespoons of granulated sugar, One pint of rich cream, One teaspoon of cornstarch, Half a teacup full of Madeira wine, Four square sponge cakes.

Boil the milk, stir in the eggs and sugar; split the vanilla bean, cut in small pieces and put in the custard while boiling.

Stir in the cornstarch and when it thickens, take it off to get cool.

Beat the cream as for charlotte russe, add the wine.

Split the sponge cakes and line the bottom of the dish.

Pour in the custard, then put the cream on top.

ICE CREAM

Half a box of Cox’s gelatin, A quarter of a pound of granulated sugar, Four pints of rich cream, One pint of boiling water, Half of a vanilla bean.

Split the vanilla bean, cut into small pieces and put into a saucepan with the gelatin, sugar and boiling water.

Let this boil until the gelatin is dissolved.

Strain and let it get cool, but not cold.

Take out the pieces of bean, scrape the inside into the gelatin.

Stir in the cream.

If not sweet enough, add sugar to the taste.

Put into a freezer and stir constantly until well frozen.

MACAROON ICE CREAM

One gallon of rich cream One dozen macaroons, Three large oranges, One teaspoon of extract of vanilla.

Sweeten the cream to the taste.

Put it into the freezer and when partially frozen, roll the macaroons very fine and stir in.

Grate the rind of one of the oranges and add, with the juice of the three; then the vanilla.

Freeze hard.

Pack the freezer well with ice broken in small pieces and a quantity of salt, which will keep the cream until wanted to serve.

PINEAPPLE CREAM

Two quarts of rich cream, Two teacupsful of granulated sugar Two cans of pineapple, The juice of two lemons.

Beat the cream very stiff and add two teacupsful of the sugar, mixing thoroughly.

Grate the pineapple very fine and put in it the other two teacupsful of sugar and lemon juice.

Stir in the cream.

Pour two-thirds of it into the freezer and when partly frozen add the other third.

Freeze well and pack with ice and salt to keep from melting.

VANILLA ICE CREAM

Half a gallon of thick cream, Half a pound of granulated sugar, Half a vanilla bean.

Boil the vanilla bean in a half a teacup full of water.

Split it and scrape well, then put it in the cream, with the sugar and freeze, hard.

Pack well as in recipe for macaroon ice cream.

NESSELRODE PUDDING

Two ounces of candied cherries, Two ounces of seeded raisins, Two ounces of candied apricots or peaches, Two ounces of candied citron, Four wineglassfuls of Marasquino cordial, One dozen waxy meringues, Half a pound of granulated sugar, One quart of rich cream, One quart of sweet milk, Four dozen Spanish chestnuts, Half of a vanilla bean, The yolks of twelve eggs.

Blanch the chestnuts, take off the skins, boil until tender and when cold, pound with the vanilla bean.

Mix with the sugar and rub through a sieve.

Make a custard of the eggs and milk and mix with the chestnuts and vanilla bean.

The night before this is to be made, the fruit must be soaked in the cordial.

Pound the meringues, half freeze the custard, stir in the fruit and mer- ingues.

Whip the cream to a froth, mix well with the custard and fruit.

Freeze hard and mold,

PINEAPPLE ICE

Two cans of pineapple, Six lemons, One quart of water, Sugar to the taste.

Grate the pineapple, squeeze the lemons and strain the juice.

Stir in the water and sweeten to the taste.

Put into a freezer well packed with ice and salt.

Beat well while freezing and cover with salt and ice to keep until served.

FROZEN SHERBET

Three pints of clear water, One pound and a half of sugar, The whites of two eggs, The juice of four lemons.

Take six lumps of sugar and rub them on the rinds of the lemons until the sugar is perfectly yellow. This is done to get the flavor of the rind.

Put them in the water with the rest of the sugar.

While it is dissolving squeeze, strain the juice and stir it in the water.

Put all into a freezer and when half frozen, add the well-beaten whites of the eggs and finish freezing.

Pack well with salt and ice to keep from melting.

ORANGE WATER ICE

Eight large oranges, A pound and a half of granulated sugar.

Rub and squeeze the oranges, as you do lemons.

Pour the juice over the sugar and mix thoroughly.

Add water until it measures two quarts.

Freeze well.

ROMAN PUNCH

Three pints of water, Six lemons, A teacup full of Jamaica rum.

Squeeze the lemons and strain the juice.

Sweeten to the taste, put into the freezer, surrounded by cracked ice, well packed with salt.

When well frozen stir in the rum, just before you send it to the table.

This quantity will be sufficient for six persons.

Of course it can be increased according to the number to be served.

FROZEN CUSTARD WITH FRUIT

Two quarts of new milk. The yolks of eight eggs. One quart of whipped cream. One pound of granulated sugar. One pint of strawberry preserves. One pint of seeded raisins. Half a pint of finely chopped citron. One pint of candied cherries.

Let the milk come to a boil, add the sugar and when thoroughly mixed, stir in the well beaten yolks of the eggs.

Dissolve a half an ounce of gelatin in a half a teacup full of cold milk.

Put it in the custard, boil once and let it get cold.

Put this in the freezer and when it begins to freeze, add the fruit.

Stir in slowly the well whipped cream.

Freeze well.

FROZEN FRUIT CUSTARD II

One pint of rich milk, One pint of whipped cream, Yolks of three eggs, One and a half teacupsful of sugar, One pint of chopped fresh peaches. Beat the eggs and sugar well together.

Heat the milk almost to boiling point and add it gradually to the beaten eggs and sugar.

Return it to the kettle and stir constantly until it has thickened a little, taking care that it does not curdle.

When the custard is partly frozen, add the whipped cream, beat a few minutes longer and then stir in the fruit.

Put all into a mold and surround it with ice and salt.

Then stiff turn out and serve.

JELLY

Two boxes of Cox’s gelatin, Three pints of clear water, One pint and a half of granulated sugar, One teacup full of brandy or whisky, One quart of sherry wine, Juice of six lemons and rinds of three, Two tablespoons of stick cinnamon, Six whole cloves, Eighteen raisins, Whites of three eggs.

Put the water on to boil.

Add the gelatin, sugar, juice of lemons, thinly cut rinds, cloves, cinnamon, raisins and well beaten whites of the eggs.

Boil until the whites gather to one side.

Pour in the wine and brandy.

Strain through a bag and mold.

Be careful not to stir the jelly when taking it up to pour through the bag.

JELLY II

One box of Cox’s gelatin, One pint of Madeira wine. Three-quarters of a pound of granulated sugar, Three pints of clear water, Two tablespoons of stick cinnamon, Whites of three eggs, Four lemons.

Cut the rind of the lemon very thin,

Strain the juice put it in with the rind, water, sugar and cinnamon, broken in pieces.

Beat the whites of the eggs very stiff and stir in the mixture, adding the crushed shells.

Let this boil until the eggs gather to one side.

Let it settle for about five minutes.

Strain through a bag and mold.

Never leave the seeds of the lemon in.

ORANGE JELLY

Twelve large oranges, One pound of granulated sugar, Two ounces of isinglass, A teacup full of hot water, The whites of two eggs.

Cut the oranges in pieces and squeeze out all the juice. If this should not make a pint, squeeze more until you get a pint cup full.

Put in the sugar and when it is dissolved put it on the fire.

Dissolve the isinglass in the hot water and stir into the juice.

Add the well beaten whites of the eggs.

Boil steadily for twenty minutes.

Strain slowly through a bag and mold.

To be eaten with cream.

CREME DIPLOMATE

One pint of whipped cream, Half an ounce of gelatin, One teacup full of candied cherries, Vanilla and sugar to the taste.

Dissolve the gelatin in a little water and stir in the whipped cream.

Sweeten and flavor to the taste and beat well.

Then add sherry wine to the taste and the candied cherries.

Put into a mold and leave it in a cool place until it gets stiff.

ANGEL’S FOOD

Half a box of gelatin, One quart of sweet milk, Four tablespoons of sugar, Vanilla to the taste, Three eggs.

Put the milk and gelatin on the fire.

Boil until the gelatin is entirely dissolved.

Add the well beaten yolks of the eggs, with the sugar.

Let it boil about five minutes; remove from the fire and stir in lightly the whites, beaten to a froth.

Flavor with vanilla and mold.

BIVAVONE

Three pints of thick cream, Three ounces of isinglass, One pint and a half of boiling water, Half a pound of granulated sugar, Half of a vanilla bean.

Beat the cream until stiff and set aside in a cool place.

Put in the water the isinglass, sugar and vanilla bean.

Split open and cut in pieces one inch long.

Boil until the isinglass is thoroughly dissolved, then strain and let it cool, but don’t let it get stiff.

Stir in the whipped cream and mold.

If made in warm weather the cream must be surrounded by ice, or it will not rise.

This can be eaten for a dessert, either with or without cream.

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD

A quarter of a pound of vanilla chocolate, Half a pound of granulated sugar, Two quarts of sweet milk. Yolks of twelve eggs, Whites of five eggs.

Grate the chocolate and put it into the milk.

When near a boil stir in the well-beaten yolks of the twelve eggs, the well-beaten whites of five and sugar.

Boil for about five minutes, stirring well to keep from curdling.

Serve cold.

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD II

One quart of sweet milk, Four tablespoons of vanilla chocolate, Sugar to the taste, Four eggs.

Boil the milk and stir in the grated chocolate, taking care to have it perfectly smooth.

Beat the eggs lightly, sweeten them and put them into the boiling chocolate, stirring well to keep from curdling.

Pour through a sieve and put it on the fire for a few minutes to thicken.

It will not curdle if you will first pour in enough of the boiling milk to the eggs to warm them, before putting them in the chocolate; but should it curdle, let it get cold.

Pour it through the sieve again and add gradually half a teacup full of fresh milk while pouring through the sieve.

CHOCOLATE CUSTARD III

Half a pound of vanilla chocolate, One tablespoon cornstarch, One coffee cup full of white sugar, One quart of sweet milk, Yolks of three eggs.

Grate the chocolate; boil the milk and mix well.

Add the sugar and eggs, lastly the cornstarch.

Let it boil three minutes and when cold, cover the top with a little sweetened whipped cream.

BAKED CUSTARD

Half a gallon of milk, Sugar and nutmeg to the taste, Six eggs.

Let the milk come to a boil, then take it off and let it cool a little.

Beat the eggs, pour the milk over them and stir until smooth. Sweeten and add a little nutmeg.

Combine and set the dish in hot water to bake until stiff like jelly.

LEMON CUSTARD FOR PIES

One teacupful of granulated sugar, Two tablespoons of butter, One teaspoon of cornstarch, Two lemons, Four eggs.

Beat the yolks well, stir in the sugar, melted butter, juice and grated rind of the lemons.

Add the well-beaten whites of the egg and the cornstarch.

Put into a saucepan with hot water underneath.

Stir until it thickens and when cool, not cold, put into the pies and bake quickly.

VANILLA CUSTARD

One pint of sweet milk, One pound of granulated sugar, One ounce of isinglass, One quart of cream, Half a pint of water, One tablespoon of rose water, Vanilla to the taste, The yolks of three eggs.

Heat milk to a boil

Stir in the yolks; add the sugar and isinglass, previously dissolved in the half pint of cold water.

When almost cold, whip the quart of cream to a stiff froth and mix it.

Add the rosewater and a little vanilla.

Put this on the ice and half an hour before serving, pour it into a mold lined with ladyfingers, also covering the top with the same.

Put it back into the ice-chest and when wanted, it will turn out nicely.

SPONGE CUSTARD

One quart of new milk, Yolks of three eggs, One teacup full of granulated sugar, One tablespoon of cornstarch, Vanilla to the taste.

Put the milk on to boil.

Beat the yolks of the eggs, sugar and cornstarch together and pour the boiling milk over, stirring while pouring.

Put back on the fire and stir until thick and when cool, flavor to the taste.

Dip some slices of stale sponge cake in wine and line a pudding dish with them.

Pour in the custard, over the top put a meringue, made in the following manner : Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth and add to them three tablespoons of granulated sugar and half a teaspoon of vanilla.

After spreading this nicely over the custard, brown in the oven and serve cold.

SPANISH CUSTARD

One quart of cream or rich milk, Three-quarters of an ounce of gelatin, Eight tablespoons of granulated sugar, The yolks of eight eggs, Vanilla to the taste.

When the milk comes to a boil, add the well-beaten yolks of the eggs and the sugar.

Stir until it cools to keep from curdling.

Dissolve the gelatin in half a pint of boiling water and when cool, mix it with the custard.

Flavor, strain and stir until cold to keep the gelatin from separating from the custard.

Mold and eat with cream.

DIRECTIONS TO THE INEXPERIENCED

FOR CAKE BAKING

The flour should always be well-sifted, the sugar well-rolled and the soda and cream of tartar thoroughly pulverized before measuring; and the measurement should be exact, in order that an excess of any ingredient should not be used.

Care must also be taken in baking. An oven too hot or too cool, or an irregular heat, will cause clammy streaks through the cake. If the heat is not uniform in all parts of the oven, as is not always the case, the cake should be turned around frequently.

COOKIES

One teacup full of butter, Three teacups of granulated sugar, One teaspoon of soda, One grated nutmeg, Four eggs.

Beat the eggs very light, then beat with the sugar; add the nutmeg and soda, mixed with a teaspoon of sour cream.

Then work in flour until stiff enough to roll.

Roll very thin; cut and bake in a quick oven.

This will make a large number if rolled thin, as directed and are delicious.

TEA CAKES

One pound of flour, One pound of sugar, One pound of butter, Half a teaspoon of cinnamon, Half a teaspoon of grated nutmeg, Three eggs.

Wash the butter well in cold water, cream it with the sugar. Add the well-beaten yolks. Throw in the flour lightly with the spices.

Beat the whites very light and mix in.

Roll, cut and sprinkle each cake with granulated sugar and bake quickly in buttered pans.

TEA CAKES II

Two pounds and a half of flour, Two pounds of brown sugar, One pound of butter, One wineglass of brandy, One wineglass of wine, One teaspoon of powdered cinnamon, One teaspoon of baking powder, Four eggs.

Sift the flour and mix in the baking powder. Rub the butter in and add the cinnamon.

Stir in a little milk.

Add the well-beaten eggs, wine and brandy.

Make the dough stiff enough to roll and cut. Bake quickly.

TEA CAKES III

Three coffee cups of sugar, One coffee cup full of butter, Three teaspoons of carbonate of ammonia, Flour enough for a stiff dough, Nutmeg to the taste, Six eggs.

Beat the sugar and butter together, break in the eggs, three at the time and beat all well for five minutes.

Put in the ammonia and nutmeg and mix with flour enough for a very stiff dough.

Roll, cut and bake quickly.

TEA CAKES IV

Two pounds of flour, One pound of granulated sugar, Half a pound of butter, Half a teacup full of sweet cream, One teaspoon of baking powder, Nutmeg to the taste, Two eggs.

Mix the baking powder with the flour.

Cream with the butter.

Add the sugar, well-beaten eggs and nutmeg. Roll, cut and bake quickly.

ANOTHER RECIPE FOR TEA CAKES

Two pounds of brown sugar, Two pounds of flour, Half a pound of butter, One teaspoon of powdered cinnamon, Three eggs.

Beat the eggs together very light, mix the butter and sugar and stir in the eggs alternately with the flour.

Add the cinnamon.

Roll thin and cut with a cake cutter.

Bake quickly.

An extra pint of flour will be required for the rolling.

DOUGHNUTS

Two pounds of flour, One pound of sugar, One pint of milk, One tablespoon of rosewater, One teaspoon of soda, One nutmeg, Four eggs.

Cut the butter into the flour and mix well with the hands.

Add the sugar, rosewater, milk and soda.

Add the well-beaten eggs.

Fry a nice brown in boiling lard.

Sugar each doughnut well while hot.

CRULLERS

Two pounds of flour, Half a pound of butter, Three quarters of a pound of sugar, A teaspoon of powdered cinnamon, Nutmeg to the taste, Six eggs.

Cream the butter and flour, add the sugar and well-beaten yolks with the cinnamon and nutmeg. Beat the whites very light and stir in slowly.

Roll out, cut into strips, twist and fry in boiling lard a light brown.

ANOTHER RECIPE FOR CRULLERS

One coffee cup full of sugar, Half a coffee cup full of butter, One coffee cup full of sweet milk, One tablespoon of baking powder, Nutmeg and cinnamon to the taste, Flour enough for a stiff dough, Three eggs.

Beat the yolks and sugar very light; add the butter and milk and flour enough for a stiff dough.

Then the nutmeg, cinnamon and well-beaten whites.

Lastly the baking powder.

Roll, shape and bake as in the previous recipe for crullers.

COCONUT CAKES

One pound of grated coconut, One pound of pulverized sugar, Rose water to the taste, The whites of three eggs.

Stir the coconut and sugar together over the fire until it begins to dry.

Add the eggs without beating and while hot, flavor delicately with the rosewater.

Drop on greased paper and put into the oven to brown.

COCONUT CAKES II

One pound of white sugar, Half a pound of flour, Whites of ten eggs, Two coconuts, Rose water to the taste.

Grate the coconuts and add to the well-beaten whites of the eggs.

Stir in the sugar and the flour, then lastly, the rosewater.

Have buttered white paper, drop the cakes with a spoon on it and bake a light brown.

COCONUT CAKE III

Two eggs, Two tablespoons of butter, One cup of sugar, Half a cup of milk, Two cups of desiccated coconut, Half a teaspoon of soda, One teaspoon of cream of tartar, A little rosewater.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the yolks well beaten, then the flour.

After the coconut has soaked half an hour in the milk, mix it with the above.

Add the whites, well beaten, rosewater, and lastly the soda and cream of tartar, mixed with a little water.

Bake in a good oven nearly an hour.

Run a straw through the center of the cake and if it is perfectly dry, it can be taken out of the oven.

HORSE MANDERS

One pound of flour, One pound of granulated sugar, Half a pound of butter, Cinnamon and mace to the taste, Five eggs.

Wash the butter well in a little cold water or rosewater.

Beat it to a cream, add the sugar, then the eggs, leaving out the whites of two.

Throw all into the flour and mix lightly.

Take out small pieces, roll in sugar as for jumbles and bake in a moderate oven.

CINNAMON JUMBLES

One pound and a half of flour, One pound of butter, One pound of sugar, Two tablespoons of ground cinnamon, Three eggs.

Rub the flour and butter together, add the sugar and eggs beaten well together, lastly the cinnamon.

Roll, cut and bake in a quick oven.

Should the above quantity of flour not be sufficient to make the dough stiff enough to roll well, add more.

CINNAMON CAKES

Flour enough to make a sponge, One heaping tablespoon of butter, One tablespoon of lard, One small teaspoon of salt, One coffee cup full of granulated sugar, Some powdered cinnamon, Three eggs.

Put the milk on the fire and put in it the lard, butter and salt.

Let it come to a boil, then let it get lukewarm.

Add the sugar, three well-beaten eggs and flour enough to make a sponge.

Let it rise until it gets quite light, then roll and cut as you do biscuit.

Mix up a little butter, sugar and powdered cinnamon, as you would for sauce.

Just before baking, make a hole in the center of each cake, pour in the mixture and bake until a nice brown.

JUMBLES

One pound of granulated sugar, One pound and a quarter of flour, One pound of butter, One gill of rosewater, Five eggs.

Beat the butter and sugar to a cream, add the eggs, well beaten, separately ; then the rosewater.

Lastly, the flour mixed lightly through the other ingredients.

Roll into round strips the thickness of your little finger and form into rings the size of half a dollar.

Bake them in tins about an inch apart, in a moderate oven.

When partly cold, they can be iced if preferred.

JUMBLES II

One pound of butter, One pound of granulated sugar, One pound of flour, Half a wineglassful of rosewater, Nutmeg to the taste, Six eggs.

Cream the butter and flour.

Add the well beaten volks and sugar in alternation and beat very light.

Put in the rosewater and nutmeg; lastly, the whites of the eggs beaten to a froth.

Roll, shape and bake in a good, but not too quick an oven.

JUMBLES III

Three-quarters of a pound of flour, Half a pound of butter, Half a pound of granulated sugar, Nutmeg to the taste, Two eggs.

Cream the butter and flour. Add the sugar, well-beaten eggs and nutmeg.

Break off small pieces of the dough the size of a walnut.

Shape into rings, sugar well and lay on well-buttered tins, an inch apart. Bake quickly.

ANOTHER RECIPE FOR JUMBLES

One pound of flour, One pound of butter, One pound of granulated sugar, One tablespoon of ground nutmeg, cinnamon and mace, One wineglass of wine and brandy, mixed, Juice and grated rind of one lemon, Six eggs.

Cut the butter up in the flour.

Add the spices, sugar, wine and rind and juice of the lemon.

Beat in the eggs and stir hard until the whole becomes a soft dough.

Shape as rings, sugar well and put into well-greased pans.

Bake quickly.

MOLASSES GINGER-BREAD

Four teacups of flour, Three teacups of molasses, One teacup of butter, One tablespoon of powdered ginger, Two eggs.

Mix the flour and molasses.

Stir in the well -beaten eggs.

Add the melted butter and then the ginger.

Should the above quantity of flour not be enough to make it as thick as pound cake, add more.

Bake slowly in a moderate oven.

MRS. DUFFRIES’ GINGER NUTS

Two pounds of flour, One pint of molasses, Half a pound of brown sugar, Three-quarters of a pound of butter, Two ounces of ground ginger, Extract of lemon to the taste.

Rub the butter and sugar together, then the molasses and with the hands mix in the flour. Add the ground ginger and extract.

Roll out thin, cut and bake in a good oven.

SOFT GINGERBREAD

Six cups of flour, Two cups of molasses, Two cups of lard and butter, mixed, Two cups of brown sugar, One cup of sweet milk, Two tablespoons of ground ginger, One tablespoon of baking powder. Four eggs.

Melt the butter, lard and molasses together.

Stir in the flour and sugar alternately, then the milk, ginger and well- beaten yolks.

Beat the whites very light and mix through slowly.

Lastly, sift in the baking powder.

Divide in two or three pans and bake in a slow oven.

This is good either warm or cold.

Use a coffee cup for measuring.

SOFT GINGER BREAD II

Six cups of flour, One cup of butter, One cup of lard, Two cups of brown sugar, Two cups of molasses, Two tablespoons of ground ginger, One cup of sweet milk, Four eggs.

Put the butter and lard on the fire and when melted, add the molasses.

Then stir in the flour and milk bv degrees and the ginger.

Beat in the mixture the yolks of the eggs, one by one and add slowly the well-beaten whites and lastly sprinkle in two tablespoons of baking powder. Divide in two or three square pans and bake in a moderate oven.

Bake this in one large cake mold and serve with a hot sauce.

It would make a delicious pudding. Measure with a coffee cup.

GINGER CAKE

Three cup and a half of flour, Two cup of brown sugar, One cup of molasses, One cup of butter, Three teaspoons of ground ginger, One pint of milk, The yellows of three eggs, One teaspoon of baking powder.

Beat the sugar and eggs together, add the other ingredients and the milk.

Add the baking powder.

Bake quickly.

HARD GINGER CAKES

Half a pound of flour, Half a pound of butter, Half a pound of brown sugar, Two tablespoons of ground ginger, One teaspoon of ground cinnamon, Half a teaspoon of ground cloves, One pint of molasses.

Mix with the hand, the flour, butter and sugar. Add the molasses, adding more flour to make the dough quite stiff. Roll and cut and bake in a quick oven.

NEWTON CAKE

Four teacups and a half of flour, Two teacups of pulverized sugar, Two teacups of molasses, One teacup of butter, One teacup of sour cream, One teaspoon of soda, One tablespoon of ground cinnamon, Four eggs.

Cream the butter and flour together, then add the molasses, melted butter and the well-beaten yolks of the eggs.

Beat the soda in the cream and stir in the mixture, then the cinnamon.

Lastly, the whites, beaten to a froth.

Bake in a moderate oven.

WHITE CAKE

Two cups of flour, One and a half cups of sugar, Half a cup full of sweet milk, Half a cup full of butter, Half a teaspoon of soda, Half a teaspoon of cream of tartar, Flavor with vanilla or lemon to the taste, The whites of five eggs.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the well- beaten eggs.

Dissolve the soda and cream of tartar in a little milk and stir in.

While adding the flour, add the milk and lastly the flavoring.

Bake immediately, in a moderately warm oven.

Use a coffee cup in measuring.

WHITE CAKE II

One pound of flour, One pound of butter, One pound of granulated sugar, Vanilla or rose water to the taste, Whites of sixteen eggs.

Cream the butter, add the flour, then the sugar.

Beat well for about five minutes. Stir in gradually the well- beaten whites of the eggs.

Flavor to the taste and bake slowly for two hours.

SCOTCH CAKE

One pound of butter, One pound of powdered sugar, Two pounds of flour, One tablespoon of nutmeg and cinnamon, mixed, One wineglass of brandy, Yolks of two eggs.

Mix the eggs and sugar, then the flour, butter and spices, lastly the brandy.

Pound for five minutes.

Roll, cut and bake quickly.

BANNOCK

One quart of sweet milk, Half a coffee cup full of pulverized sugar, Half a teaspoon of soda, One teaspoon of cream of tartar, A cooking-spoonful of butter, Cornmeal enough for a thin batter, Three eggs.

Stir into the milk enough meal to make a thin batter.\

Add the well-beaten yolks of the eggs, sugar, melted butter, soda and cream of tartar.

Lastly, the whites beaten very light.

Bake in a long tin pan, in a good oven.

Cut in squares and serve hot.

ANGEL’S FOOD CAKE

One tumblerful of flour, One tumblerful and a half of granulated sugar One teaspoon of cream of tartar, One teaspoon of vanilla, The whites of eleven eggs.

Sift the flour four times.

Add the cream of tartar and sift again.

Sift the sugar four times.

Beat the eggs to a stiff froth; then on the same platter, add the sugar lightly to them.

Add the flour slowly and vanilla.

Do not stop beating until the cake is put in the pan to bake.

Bake forty minutes in a moderate oven.

Turn the pan upside down to cool and don’t grease it before putting in the cake.

The tumbler for measuring should hold about four gills and a quarter.

BISQUIT SOUFFLE

Two ounces of granulated sugar, One dessertspoonful of flour, One pint of milk, Vanilla to the taste, Six eggs.

Put the milk into the saucepan with a teaspoon of sugar and vanilla to the taste.

Let it boil.

Add the flour and stir until it thickens and detaches itself from the pan, which will take about half an hour.

Remove it from the fire; stir in the eggs, one at a time and sift in the two ounces of sugar.

Have ready in a skillet some hot lard, in which drop a tablespoon at the time, as the boiling will increase the size.

When a nice brown, drain and sprinkle sugar on each.

CUP CAKE

Three teacups of flour, One teacup of sweet milk, One teacup of butter, One teaspoon of baking powder, Two teacups of sugar, Vanilla to the taste, Four eggs.

Mix the baking powder thoroughly with the flour, then with the butter.

Beat the yolks of the eggs with the sugar and add the flour, then the milk and whites of the eggs, which have been previously beaten to a stiff froth.

Lastly, the vanilla to the taste.

Bake in a good oven.

CUP CAKE II

One coffee of butter, Three coffee cups of flour, Two coffee cups of granulated sugar, Half a coffee cup of milk, One teaspoon of baking powder, Four eggs.

Cream the butter and flour.

Add the well-beaten yolks of the eggs and sugar, in alternation with the milk.

Beat the whites to a stiff froth and stir in slowly.

Then sift in the baking powder and bake in a quick oven.

Should this be used for jelly cake, put in five eggs and a cup of milk.

Flavor with any extract to the taste

CORNSTARCH CAKE

Three teacups of flour, One teacup of cornstarch, Two teacup and a half of white sugar, One teacup of sweet milk, Two teaspoons of cream tartar, One teaspoon of soda, One teacup of butter, Four eggs.

Cream the butter and sugar together.

Add the yolks of the eggs, milk and flour alternately, then the cornstarch.

Beat the whites very light and stir in gently.

Lastly, put in the soda and cream of tartar, mixed with a little milk.

Flavor with lemon and bake in a well-heated oven.

Eat cold or serve as a pudding with sauce.

SPICE CAKE

One pound of flour, One pound of brown sugar, One tablespoon of ground cinnamon, One tablespoon of ground cloves, One tablespoon of ground allspice, One wineglass of brandy or sherry, One teacup of sour cream, One teaspoon of soda, Half a pound of butter, One grated nutmeg, Six eggs.

Cream the butter and flour, add the yolks of the eggs, well-beaten, sugar, spices and brandy.

Mix the soda with the cream and stir in.

Lastly beat the whites of the eggs to a froth and mix in very slowly.

Bake slowly for an hour and a quarter.

This is delicious served hot as a pudding with a hot sauce.

SPICE CAKE II

Three coffee cups of flour, One coffee cup of butter, One coffee cup of milk, Two coffee cups of sugar, Half a coffee cup of raisins and currants, mixed, One teaspoon of ground cinnamon, Half a teaspoon of ground cloves, Two teaspoons of baking powder. One grated nutmeg, Flavor to the taste, Two eggs.

Stone the raisins, wash, pick and dry the currants.

Flour well.

Beat the eggs and stir in the milk, then the sugar and butter melted.

Beat well.

Add the spices and flavoring and lastly the baking powder.

Bake slowly.

A ONE-EGG CAKE

One and a half cups of flour, One cup of granulated sugar, Three tablespoons of melted butter, A heaping spoonful of baking powder, Flavoring to the taste, One egg.

Mix the flour and butter together.

Add the sugar, well-beaten yolk of the egg and flavoring.

Beat the white of the egg to a stiff froth and stir in; lastly, add the baking powder.

You can substitute a half a teaspoon of soda and a teaspoon of cream of tartar for the baking powder.

Bake in a well-heated oven for three-quarters of an hour, or one hour; as so much depends upon the regular heat of the oven.

Measure with a coffee cup.

CHOCOLATE CAKE

Two cups of flour, Two cups of granulated sugar, One and a half cups of grated chocolate, Half a cup of sweet milk, Two teaspoons of vanilla, One teaspoon of baking powder, One cup of butter, Four eggs.

Cream the butter and sugar together and add in alternation the well-beaten yolks and the flour.

Boil the milk, melt the chocolate in it, then mix it with the butter, eggs and flour and the well-beaten whites.

Lastly, sift in the baking powder.

Bake in a good oven.

Measure with a coffee cup.

VANILLA CAKE

A quarter of a pound of butter, Half a pound of flour, Half a pound of sugar, The whites of four eggs, Extract of vanilla to the taste.

Cream the butter and sugar, add alternately the flour and well-beaten eggs.

Lastly, the extract to the taste.

Bake in jelly cake pans.

FILLING FOR VANILLA CAKE

Half a pint of milk, Two tablespoons of cornstarch, The yolks of two eggs, One vanilla bean.

Boil in the milk, the vanilla bean.

Add slowly the well-beaten eggs and be careful not to let the mixture curdle.

Stir in the cornstarch until it thickens. Take out the bean and when cool spread over the cake and arrange in layers as for jelly cake.

SILVER CAKE

The whites of eight eggs, Two and a half cups of flour, Two cups of granulated sugar, One cup full of sweet milk, Half a cup full of butter, One teaspoon of baking powder, Flavor with any extract to the taste.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the milk and extract.

Beat the whites to a stiff froth and stir in lightly.

Sift in the baking powder and bake quickly.

Use a coffee cup in measuring.

GOLDEN CAKE

Yolks of eight eggs, Two coffee cups of flour, Half a coffee cup of butter, One coffee cup of sweet milk, One and a half coflee cups of brown sugar, A heaping teaspoon of baking powder, Extract of vanilla to the taste.

Cream the butter and flour, add the well-beaten eggs, sugar and milk in alternation.

Flavor with vanilla.

Sift in the baking powder and bake in a quick oven.

A CHEAP SPONGE CAKE

Two cups of flour, One cup full of pulverized sugar, A tablespoon of butter, One cup full of sweet milk, One teaspoon of cream of tartar, Half a teaspoon of soda, Flavoring to the taste, One egg.

Cream the batter and flour.

Add the sugar and milk alternately.

Add the well-beaten yolk of the egg.

Sift in the soda and the cream of tartar and flavor to the taste.

Lastly, beat the white of the egg very light and stir in gradually.

Bake in square tins twenty minutes.

Measure with a coffee cup.

WHITE SPONGE CAKE

Whites of twelve eggs, Yolks of four eggs, One pound of granulated sugar, Half a pound of flour, One tablespoon of vinegar.

Beat the yolks separately until very light, then together.

Add the sugar.

Sift the flour three times and stir in slowly.

Put in the vinegar.

Bake slowly.

SPONGE CAKE

The whites of twelve eggs, The yolks of four eggs, One pound of granulated sugar, Half a pound of flour, The juice and grated rind of one lemon.

Beat the eggs separately until very light, mix the together.

Add the sugar, juice and rind of the lemon lastly the flour, through a sieve, a little at the time.

Bake slowly in a good oven, but not too quick a one.

SPONGE CAKE II

Two coffee cups of flour, Two coffee cups of granulated sugar, Two teaspoons of baking powder, Vanilla or lemon to the taste, Eight eggs.

Beat the yellows of the eggs and sugar well, sift the flour in lightly, then the baking powder.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a froth and stir in slowly.

Then stir in the extract to the taste.

Bake slowly in a good oven, but not too quick a one.

COCONUT SPONGE CAKE

One grated coconut, Half a pound of granulated sugar, A quarter of a pound of flour, One teaspoon of essence of lemon, Half of a grated nutmeg, A saltspoonful of salt, Six eggs.

Beat the yolks of the eggs with the sugar, then add the flour, salt, essence of lemon and grated nutmeg.

Beat the whites to a stiff froth and stir in.

Lastly, put in the grated coconut.

Line square tin pans with well-greased paper.

Put the mixture in an inch deep and bake in a quick oven a half an hour.

Cut into squares and serve either with or without icing.

WHITE CAKE

Whites of thirteen eggs, One pound of granulated sugar, Half a pound of butter, One pound of flour, Two teaspoons of cream of tartar, Vanilla to the taste.

Beat the eggs until very stiff and add the sugar slowly to them.

Put the cream of tartar in the flour and cream it with the butter; then add the eggs.

Bake slowly.

WAFER CAKES

One quart of flour, One pint of brown sugar, Two tablespoons of butter, Cinnamon and nutmeg to the taste, Four eggs.

Beat the yellows of the eggs very light.\

Add the sugar and flour, then the butter, melted.

Beat the whites to a froth and stir in lightly.

Lastly, the cinnamon and nutmeg to the taste

Roll very thin and bake in wafer irons.

CUSTARD CAKE

Whites of six eggs, Half a pound of butter, One pound of sugar, One pound of flour, One teaspoon of cream of tartar, Half a teaspoon soda, One cup of milk. Flavor with lemon or vanilla.

Cream the butter and sugar.

Add the flour and milk alternately, beating well all the time.

Beat the whites of the eggs to a froth and stir in.\

Lastly, put in the soda and cream of tartar, mixed with a little milk.

Bake the cake in jelly pans in a well-heated oven.

THE CUSTARD

One pint of milk, Four ounces of sugar, Yolks of three eggs, One teaspoon of cornstarch, Vanilla or lemon to the taste.

Boil the milk, add the eggs well beaten. Add the sugar and extract.

Lastly, the cornstarch. Stir until very thick.

When cool, spread over the cake and put one on top of the other, as you would jelly cake.

BLACK CAKE

One and a half pounds of flour, One pound and a half of sugar, Four pounds of seeded raisins, Two pounds of currants that have been washed and dried, One pound of citron cut in thin slices, Two pounds of blanched almonds, One pint of cherry preserves, One pint of molasses, One tumbler of whisky or brandy, Two tablespoons of rosewater, Half an ounce of ground mace, Two ounces of ground cinnamon, Three grated nutmegs, One dozen eggs.

Cream the butter and sugar well together.

After beating the eggs very light, mix then into the sugar alternately with the flour.

Let the spices stand overnight in the liquor and add to the above in the morning.

Dredge the fruit well with the flour and put in last.

In putting the mixture in the mold to bake, distribute the almonds in layers.

CHOCOLATE FRUIT CAKE

A quarter of a pound of Maillard’s chocolate, One pound of flour, One pound of sugar, Half a pound of butter, One teacup of sour milk, One teaspoon of soda, Half a pound of seeded raisins, Half a pound of dried currants, Two teaspoons of cream of tartar, Half a teaspoon of vanilla, Six eggs.

Beat the eggs separately, then together and then with the sugar.

Sift the flour and cream of tartar, twice and cream with the butter.

Mix well with the eggs.

Beat the soda in the milk.

Pour enough boiling water on the chocolate to dissolve it and add to the above.

Seed the raisins, wash, pick and dry the currants, dredge well with flour and stir lightly into the cake.

Grease a cake mold well, pour in and bake slowly until thoroughly done.

ICING FOR CAKES

Beat to a stiff froth the whites of two eggs, or more, according to the quantity desired.

Add the extract of vanilla or lemon to the taste.

Stir in gradually pulverized sugar, until it will spread nicely with a knife and always dip the knife in cold water before spreading the icing.

As eggs vary in size, no rule can be given as to the quantity of sugar required, but enough must be added to prevent its running, or it will not be hard or firm.

Spread while the cake is warm.

ICING FOR CAKE II

One pound of pulverized sugar, Whites of four eggs, Juice of one lemon.

Pour over the sugar cold water enough to dissolve it.

Beat the eggs until very stiff and add by degrees the sugar.

Pat the bowl in a pan of ice water and stir well until it thickens, then add the lemon juice.

Put this on the cake with a knife and when smoothing it over the cake dip the knife in ice water to keep it from sticking.

PRESERVES, SYRUPS, CORDIALS AND CANDIES

STRAWBERRY PRESERVES

Ten pounds of full ripe strawberries, Ten pounds of granulated sugar. Do not weigh the strawberries until they have been picked.

Put the sugar into a preserving kettle, with one pint of water; let it boil until perfectly clear.

Put in the strawberries and in five minutes they will begin to boil; let them boil twenty minutes; skim with a perforated skimmer, all the scum that rises from them while boiling.

When it ceases to rise, take out the strawberries with the skimmer, a few at a time.

Let the syrup boil five minutes longer and pour over the fruit.

Seal tightly in glass jars.

CHERRY PRESERVES

Twelve pounds of stoned cherries, Twelve pounds of granulated sugar. Stone the cherries and save the juice that escapes while stoning them.

Pour the cherry juice on the sugar and when dissolved, put it on the fire.

After it has boiled about fifteen minutes, put in the fruit and boil steadily one hour.

Seal in glass jars.

PEACH PRESERVES

Eight pounds of peaches, Six pounds of granulated sugar. Get full ripe cling-stone peaches, either white or yellow.

Take a pen-knife and cut closely around the stone until you get it out, then weigh the peaches.

Put the sugar on them and let them stand one hour.

Drain the juice into a preserving kettle, boil and skim for twenty minutes.

Put in the peaches and let them boil steadily, skimming frequently, until they are perfectly done.

Take them up with a perforated spoon, put into glass jars.

Let the syrup boil fifteen minutes longer, then pour over the peaches.

Put brandy paper over each jar and seal tight.

CITRON OR WATERMELLON PRESERVE

One pound of pared watermellon rind, One pound of granulated sugar, The thinly cut rind of one lemon, Half a teaspoon of ground ginger. The rind of the mellon must be carefully pared and cut in pieces before weighing. Cut in any shape you choose.

Soak the pieces a day and night in a little weak alum and salt water.

Rinse and boil in clear water until you can pierce them with a fork.

Make a syrup of the sugar, adding enough vinegar to keep from turning to sugar and boil the lemon rind in it (cut thin) and ginger until clear.

Pour over the fruit while hot.

These proportions can be increased as required.

CURRANT JELLY

To every pint of currant juice One pound of granulated sugar. Pick as many currants as you intend preserving.

Put them in stone jars and place them in kettles of cold water over the fire.

Let the water boil and keep it boiling as high as the fruit.

In order to do that, it will be necessary to replenish with hot water from time to time.

When the currants are soft, press out the juice, strain and measure; and to as many pints of juice, allow so many pounds of granulated sugar.

Put the juice in the kettle to boil. At the same time spreading the sugar in large bread pans and putting it in the oven to heat. When the juice has boiled eight minutes, pour in the sugar and boil five minutes longer.

Before you fill the tumblers, put in a teaspoon and by allowing the jelly to fall on the spoon first, it will prevent the glass from cracking.

QUINCE JELLY

Pour over the cores and peelings, water enough to cover them.

Boil until tender, then strain.

To a pint of the water put a pound of pulverized sugar and boil until it will jelly, which you can see by trying a little of it in a saucer and placing the saucer over cold water.

BLACKBERRY JAM

Twelve pounds of blackberries, Three pounds of white sugar, One teaspoon of soda.

Pick the fruit and mash through a colander with a potato masher, throwing away the white seed, or inside of the berries.

After it has been mashed, weigh it according to the above proportions and put it on the fire.

When it begins to boil, stir in the teaspoon of soda and boil it about three quarters of an hour, skimming carefully all the time.

Then add the sugar and let it boil until it gets thick and looks as though it will be stiff when it gets cold.

Seal it tightly in glass jars.

RED RASPBERRY JAM

Eight pints of red raspberries, Two pints of currant juice.

Mash the raspberries well and mix with the currant juice.

Weigh and add an equal quantity of granulated sugar.

Boil slowly until quite thick, then seal in glass jars.

Old currant jelly can be used.

The juice cannot be bad. In that case only put in sugar in proportion to the berries.

TO BRANDY GREENGAGES

Take the quantity of greengages you wish to brandy; wipe them dry and throw them into boiling water and boil only until they are tender, but don’t let them burst open.

Spread them on dishes to cool and when cold put them into jars and fill the jars with equal portions of syrup and white brandy.

The syrup should be made rich and strong, as the gages are very acid.

The proportions for a rich syrup are, to every pint of granulated sugar, put in half a pint of water.

Boil slowly and skim carefully until it is thick and clear.

The gages must be sealed tightly.

TOMATO FIGS

One peck of tomatoes, Six pounds of brown sugar.

Scald the tomatoes, remove the skin in the usual way and weigh them.

Put them in a kettle with the sugar and boil them until the sugar penetrates and they are clarified.

Take them out, spread them on dishes, flatten and dry them in the sun.

Sprinkle small quantities of syrup occasionally over them until dried.

Then pack them in boxes in layers, sprinkling each layer with powdered white sugar.

They will keep well from year to year and retain surprisingly their flavor, which is nearly as good as the best quality of figs.

The pear shaped or single tomato answers the purpose best.

FRESH FIG PRESERVES

Five pounds of southern figs, Five pounds of granulated sugar, Five pints of clear water, Extract of lemon to the taste.

Dip the figs in hot lye, as for brandy peaches and wipe each one with a coarse, dry cloth, so as to have the skin perfectly smooth.

Put into a kettle the water, sugar and extract, boil and skim until clear.

Put in the figs and let them simmer until transparent.

Put into preserve jars and seal.

PEACH MARMALADE

Ten pounds of soft yellow peaches, Six pounds of brown sugar.

Get the full ripe, open stone, yellow peach. Peel. Bake out the stone and weigh.

Then chop very fine and mix the sugar thoroughly with them.

Put into a preserving kettle, let them simmer steadily but not too rapidly, for two hours, stirring constantly, to keep them from burning.

Put into glass jars and when cooled, cover with paper saturated with brandy and seal with flour paste.

ORANGE MARMALADE

As many oranges as are to be preserved, Granulated sugar according to the quantity of fruit.

Remove the rind and seeds from the oranges.

Cut the rind of one half in very fine strips and parboil in water until enough of the bitter has been removed and sufficient taste remains to flavor the pulp nicely.

Cut up the pulp as fine as possible and mix with the rind.

Add to every pound of the fruit, one pound of granulated sugar.

Put into a preserving kettle and stir slowly all the time it is boiling.

When it is a clear golden color it is done.

This is delicious with ice cream, plain cream, or on pastry puffs.

QUINCE PRESERVES

Ten pounds of ripe quinces, Ten pounds of granulated sugar.

Boil the quinces for a quarter of an hour, then peel them, cut the size you wish and weigh.

Keep the cores and peelings for jelly.

Wet the sugar with some of the water the fruit was boiled in, say a half a teacup to the pound.

Skim and boil for fifteen minutes, then put in the fruit and cook until the pieces are tender enough to be pierced with a straw.

Put in glass jars and seal tightly.

To make the jelly, take the water the fruit was boiled in and put in the peelings, seeds and sugar to the taste. Boil slowly until it will jelly by trying it on ice. Strain and put in tumblers.

QUINCE MARMALADE

Six pounds of ripe yellow quinces, Four pounds of granulated sugar.

Peel the quinces, core and quarter them.

Put the peelings and cores into a preserving kettle, with water enough to cover them.

Boil until very soft and strain.

Put the quinces and sugar into the kettle and pour over them the strained liquor from the peelings and cores.

Boil the whole until a smooth mass, skimming well all the time and stirring from the bottom to keep it from sticking.

Put into glass jars and seal tightly.

PINEAPPLE MARMALADE

Six pounds of grated pineapple, Six pounds of granulated sugar.

Peel and grate the pineapple.

Mix with the sugar and let it stand one hour.

Put into a preserving kettle, boil until smooth

Put into glass jars and seal tightly.

Skim and stir as peach marmalade.

APPLE MARMALADE

Six pounds of chopped pippins, Six pounds of white sugar, Five lemons.

Peel and chop the apples and put them into a preserving kettle with two teacups of clear water and the thin rind of the lemons.

Boil until very soft and mash smooth with a spoon.

Take out the rind; add the sugar and lemon juice.

Boil until quite thick, stirring from the bottom and skimming frequently.

Put into glass jars and cover tightly.

TO DRY CHERRIES

Take as many cherries as you wish to put up, stone them and save the juice. Weigh the cherries and allow one pound of good brown sugar to three of fruit.

Boil the sugar with the juice for ten minutes, put in the cherries and stew them twenty minutes.

Take them out to drain and lay them on dishes in the sun to dry.

Keep the syrup and pour a little at the time over the cherries to dry.

They must be frequently turned over and when all the syrup is used, put the cherries in layers in jars, sprinkling powdered sugar between each layer.

These will be nice for pies, puddings, rolled dumplings and.

Damsons and plums can be dried in the same way.

TO DRY APPLES

Take the quantity of apples you wish to dry; peel and slice them, string them on a very coarse thread and hang the up in a warm place until thoroughly dried.

Peaches can be dried in the same way.

APPLE BUTTER

Take as much new sweet cider as you wish to use, fresh from the press.

Boil it down to one half the original quantity.

Have ready some fine juicy apples, pared, cored and quartered.

Put as many in the kettle as can be kept moist by the cider.

Stew until the consistency of soft marmalade and a dark brown color, stirring frequently.

It is quite an improvement to have one fourth as many quinces as apples.

If well boiled, it will keep a year.

TO PREPARE HONEY FOR WINTER USE

Pour all the honey to be prepared in a clean colander; support the ears of the colander by two rods resting on the brim of the bowl.

Cut the comb transversely and repeatedly, then leave it to drain.

This will take a day or two, the honey running through a clear liquid, leaving the wax behind clear and dry.

Bottle the strained honey, cork tight and it will be ready for use at any time.

To make assurance doubly sure, some housekeepers let their honey boil before bottling and say thus prepared it may be kept for an indefinite length of time. A warm, dry storeroom is best to keep it in.

EGG NOGG

Yolks of two dozen eggs, Three quarts of rich cream, One tumblerful of brandy and whisky, mixed, One tumblerful of sherry wine, Sugar and nutmeg to the taste.

Beat the eggs and sugar together and stir in the brandy and whisky to cook the eggs.

Then add the sherry wine and nutmeg.

Beat the cream very light and stir gradually in the eggs.

TO MAKE LEMON SYRUP

Ten fresh lemons, Three pounds of granulated sugar, Two pints of clear water, The thinly cut rind of four lemons.

First cut the rind of four lemons, as thinly as it can be cut.

Squeeze the lemons and strain the juice.

Put on the water with rind and sugar and skim until perfectly clear.

Then add the juice of the lemons, boil about eight minutes longer, bottle and seal.

This will keep well in a cool place for months.

This quantity can, of course, be increased as may be desired.

LEMON SYRUP II

Two large fresh lemons, Two pounds of lump sugar, Two ounces of citric acid, One pint of boiling water.

Slice the lemons very thin, taking out the seeds.

Pour the boiling water on the lemons, sugar and citric acid.

Stir constantly and when cold, strain through a fine strainer and bottle.

PEACH CORDIAL

Three dozen yellow peaches, One gallon of peach brandy, One pound and three quarters of loaf sugar.

Peel and cut the peaches in half, crack the stones and take out enough of the kernels to make a half a tumblerful and put all into a stone jar.

Pour about a teacup full of water over the sugar and let it boil until a rich syrup, skimming carefully while it is boiling. Mix it with the brandy and pour over the fruit.

Let this stand for six weeks, then strain and bottle.

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL

Two quarts of blackberry juice, One pound of granulated sugar, Half an ounce of grated nutmeg, Half an ounce of ground cinnamon, A quarter of an ounce of ground allspice, One pint of the best brandy.

Prepare the blackberries as you would currants, by putting them into a stone jar and keeping it in boiling water until the quantity of juice required is extracted from them.

Put in the sugar, tie the spices in a muslin bag and boil all for one hour.

Strain through a flannel bag; add the brandy and cork tightly.

RASPBERRY CORDIAL

Six quarts of ripe red raspberries, Six quarts of the best brandy.

Pour the brandy over the berries; cover and let them stand for one week.

Strain through a bag, pressing out all the liquid.

When you have got out all you want, reduce the strength to your taste with water.

Allow a pound of granulated sugar to the gallon and let it stand until clear, then bottle.

Don’t boil, or you will destroy the flavor of the fruit.

Make strawberry cordial in the same way.

RASPBERRY VINEGAR

Four quarts of raspberries. Two quarts of vinegar.

First, get the red raspberries and have them fully ripe.

Pour over the four quarts of berries two quarts of vinegar.

Let this stand for twenty-four hours.

Strain and pour the juice over four quarts of fresh berries.

Let this stand another twenty-four hours; strain again, then allow a pound of granulated sugar to every pint of juice.

When the sugar is dissolved, pour into a preserving kettle and boil and skim for one hour.

Seal tight.

PUNCH A LA REGENT

One quart bottle of dry champagne, One pint of good brandy, One quart of well-drawn green tea, One tumblerful of maraschino cordial, One wineglassful of good rum, Eight thin slices of pineapple, Four tablespoons of granulated sugar, The rind and juice of one lemon, The rind and juice of one orange.

Mix the champagne, brandy and rum together.

Peel and cut in thin, small pieces the pineapple, also the rinds of the lemon and orange; and, with the strained juice, stir into the champagne, etc.

Lastly, add the maraschino cordial and green tea.

This can be put into wide-mouthed bottles and kept for weeks on the ice.

When drinking it use ice freely.

Water can also be added, should it prove too strong for some tastes.

ORANGE CORDIAL

A quart of the best alcohol, Orange peelings, Granulated sugar.

Put into a large jar the quart of alcohol.

Throw into it the peelings of as many oranges as it will conveniently hold.

When the alcohol is highly colored it will be ready for use.

Make the syrup in the following manner:

Take two pounds of sugar and a pint of clear water. Let it boil until it thickens, skimming carefully all the time.

When perfectly clear it is done. When cool, not cold, stir in well the alcohol. This is delicious as a cordial, or for sauces for puddings.

PUNCH FOR BOTTLING

One pint of the best green tea, One quart of boiling water, Two quarts of Jamaica rum, Two lemons, One cup full of currant jelly, One pound and a half of loaf sugar, One bottle of Curacoa cordial, Three pints of brandy.

Pour the boiling water on the tea; let it draw, then strain.

Slice the lemons, take out the seeds and put them (the lemons) in the hot tea.

Stir in the jelly and sugar and after the sugar has dissolved, add the rum and brandy.

Let this stand twenty-four hours in a close stone jar.

Strain, add the curacoa and bottle.

To be used in punch glasses and water if necessary. Ice also can be used in it.

WHISKEY PUNCH FOR BOTTLING

One gallon of whiskey. One quart of Jamaica rum, Three pints of clear water, Ten lemons.

Squeeze the lemons, strain and stir the juice in the water.

Add the rum and whiskey and sweeten to the taste.

Let it simmer slowly for twenty minutes, cover until cold, then bottle.

Drink either cold or hot and add water if too strong.

Use Bourbon whiskey.

CURRANT WINE

One gallon of currant juice, Two pounds of granulated sugar, One quart of clear water, One pint of Jamaica rum.

Put the juice, sugar and water, into a preserving kettle.

Let it boil for five minutes, taking care to skim it well while boiling.

Take it off and pour into a stone jar to stand for a week.

If necessary, skim again, then add the rum.

BLACKBERRY WINE

Fifteen gallons of blackberries, Five gallons of water.

Mash the berries, but do not bruise the seed.

Allow them to stand twenty-four hours, strain and add three pounds of the best white sugar to each gallon of juice.

When the sugar is thoroughly dissolved, put all into a cask with the water.

Put a piece of muslin over the hole and allow it to stand until fermentation ceases, after which cork tightly or bottle.

CANDY

Three pounds of white or brown sugar, One and three-fourths of a pint of cold water, Two tablespoons of butter. One-fourth of a teaspoon of salt and soda mixed, Three tablespoons of vinegar.

Mix the sugar and water. When it boils add the butter.

When thoroughly melted, stir in the vinegar, soda and salt.

Cook until done, which can be ascertained by putting a little in cold water.

If it hardens in the water, take it off. While pulling, drop a little vanilla on it.

TAFFY

Two cups of brown sugar, One-half a pound of butter, One teaspoon of extract of vanilla.

Put the above ingredients into a saucepan, melt together and stir over a bright fire for twelve minutes.

Add the vanilla and cook three minutes longer.

Grease a marble slab, pour on it the mixture and when cool enough, cut in small squares.

Before it is perfectly cold, grease a knife and loosen it from the marble to keep it from sticking.

CARAMELS

One fourth of a cup full of chocolate, One cup full and a half of brown sugar, A quarter of a pound of butter, One cup full of sweet milk.

Mix the sugar and butter well together, then add the sweet milk and chocolate.

Stir until thoroughly dissolved, then boil half an hour and just before it is ready to be taken off the fire.

Flavor to the taste with the extract of vanilla.

Pour into pans and when nearly cool take a sharp knife and cut it in squares.

Measure with a coffee cup.

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS

One quarter of a pound of chocolate, One pound and a half of brown sugar, One teacup full of cream, Extract of vanilla to the taste.

Grate the chocolate, scald the cream and pour it over the chocolate, stirring until smooth.

Then add the vanilla, put into a saucepan and cook until it thickens.

Grease a pan, pour in the mixture and when cool cut in squares with a greased knife.

Use Baker’s chocolate.

PHILADELPHIA WALNUT CANDY

One quart of New Orleans molasses, One pint of walnut meats, One tablespoon of butter, One tablespoon of soda.

Boil the molasses until a nice candy is made from it.

When done, stir in the soda, butter and walnut meats.

Beat hard until it gets light; then pour into buttered pans.

PICKLES AND CATSUPS TO GREEN PICKLES

One gallon of cider vinegar, One gallon of water, Two tablespoons of alum.

Put the water, vinegar and alum into a brass preserving kettle and boil for about ten minutes.

Put the pickles in a jar and pour the vinegar over them boiling hot.

Do this every morning for nine mornings.

The pickles should be put previously into a brine strong enough to bear an egg and allowed to remain in it for one week.

When packing the jars, it is always better to have the cucumbers as near the same size as possible.\

TO PREPARE VINEGAR FOR CUCUMBER PICKLES

Two gallons of the best cider vinegar, Half a pint of black mustard seed, Half a pint of white mustard seed, One teacup of horseradish, Eight medium sized onions, Two pounds of brown sugar, Two ounces of celery seed, Three ounces of black pepper grains, Three ounces of whole allspice, Two ounces of stick cinnamon.

Pound the allspice, cinnamon and pepper grains together until well broken up.

Scrape and cut the horseradish into thin pieces.

Peel and quarter the onions and with the spices, put into the vinegar to boil until it tastes well of the spices.

Put the pickles into stone jars, with the spices sprinkled through and a teaspoon of alum in each jar.

Pour the vinegar on while hot and cover closely.

This will be sufficient for four hundred small cucumbers.

TO GREEN PICKLES IN THE FALL

Two quarts of vinegar, Two quarts of water, Two tablespoons of alum.

First, put into a brass kettle a layer of pickles, then a layer of fresh grape leaves.

After dissolving the alum in the vinegar and water.

Pour it over the pickles and let them steam until well greened.

TO STUFF CUCUMBERS

Forty large cucumbers, Three ounces of ground mace, Half a pound of ground ginger, Half a pound of grated horseradish, One pound of white mustard seed, Half a pound of chopped onions, Two ounces of turmeric, One ounce of ground cloves, One ounce of ground allspice, Half a pint of mixed English mustard, Half a pint of salad oil, Half a pound of brown sugar.

Green the cucumbers, take out the seed, sprinkle them inside and out with salt and let them stand for twenty-four hours.

Drain and make a stuffing of the above ingredients.\

Fill each cucumber and sew up well with strong thread.

Put them in jars and cover with cold cider vinegar.

Put sticks to keep the cucumbers under the vinegar.

Keep in a cool dry place.

Don’t forget to put a lump of alum the size of a hickory nut in each jar.

ANOTHER WAY TO STUFF CUCUMBERS

A half pound of white mustard seed, A half pound of black mustard seed, Three tablespoons of turmeric, One tablespoon of ground cloves, Six tablespoons of sweet oil, Four finely chopped onions, Four finely chopped green bell peppers, One pint of chopped cucumbers that have been in brine, Two tablespoons of celery seed or chopped celery, Two ounces of ground ginger.

Let the cucumbers remain for three days in weak salt and water.

Then put a layer of cucumbers and a layer of grape leaves, until the kettle is nearly full.

Put in equal quantities of water and vinegar and a teaspoon of alum.

Let them steam until the cucumbers are green, then throw them in cold water and let them drain on a waiter so as to make them crisp.

Open and scrape out the seeds and put them in fresh vinegar and water.

Add a pound of brown sugar to the gallon of vinegar.

Scald for three consecutive days and make the filling of the above ingredients.

Fill the cucumbers, sew them up and put them into stone jars.

Pour boiling hot vinegar over them, into which you have put one pound of brown sugar to the gallon of vinegar.

Put in each jar three red pepper pods, two teaspoons of scraped horseradish and two or three bruised pieces of ginger root.

This filling will also answer for melon mangoes.

Cover tightly.

OILED CUCUMBERS

Fifty large cucumbers, Twelve large onions, Six tablespoons of celery seed, Six small red pepper pods, Five pints of good cider vinegar, A quart bottle of the best salad oil.

Peel the cucumbers and onions and slice quite thin.

Strew salt over them, then cover and let them stand until morning.

Put them into a colander to drain thoroughly, cover with the vinegar and let them stand four hours.

Put into the kettle the oil, celery seed, red peppers and add the vinegar drained from the cucumbers and onions.

Let all simmer for ten minutes and pour back on the cucumbers and onions very hot.

Put into close jars and in a week they will be ready for use.

This is excellent with fish, steaks, or as a relish for supper.

TO MAKE YELLOW PICKLE

One pound of sliced ginger, One pound of scraped horseradish, One pound of white mustard seed, A quarter of a pound of celery seed, One ounce of ground mace, One ounce of grated nutmeg, One ounce of white pepper grains, Three gallons of strong cider vinegar, Half a pound of turmeric.

Put all of the articles intended for the yellow pickle into a stone jar.

Pour on them boiling salt and water and let them stand forty-eight hours.

Then press out the water and lay them on a table covered with a soft cloth in the full sunshine.

When dried, put them into stone jars with cold vinegar and a little turmeric in it.

Let them stand about twelve days, draw off the water.

Put them into clean jars and cover with vinegar prepared in the following manner: Put the above spices, horseradish, turmeric, etc., with the three gallons of vinegar into a brass kettle, boil until the vinegar tastes strongly of the ingredients. Let it get cold, then pour over the pickles.

FRENCH PICKLE

A half a bushel of green tomatoes, One dozen white onions, Three pounds of brown sugar, A gallon and a half of cider vinegar, A teaspoon and a half of French mustard, One ounce of ground cloves, One ounce of ground allspice, One ounce of ground cinnamon, One ounce of turmeric, One ounce of ground black pepper, One ounce celery seed.

Slice the tomatoes and onions, salt and let them stand overnight.

In the morning drain through a colander, put them in a porcelain kettle and cover with equal portions of vinegar and water.

Boil slowly one hour, then drain through a colander for a half an hour.

Put on the fire the gallon and a half of vinegar and three pounds of brown sugar.

Boil and skim for fifteen minutes.

Mix the turmeric, spices and mustard to a paste with a little cold water, adding the ground black pepper.

Stir this in the vinegar while boiling and simmer for five minutes.

Use stone jars and put in a layer of the tomatoes and a cup full of the mixture until the jars are filled.

It will be ready for immediate use.

ROUGH AND READY PICKLE

Six dozen cucumbers, Half a peck of green tomatoes, One dozen green bull nose peppers, One dozen white onions, Half a teacup full of ground black pepper, Half a teacup full of ground cloves and allspice, mixed, Half a pound of white mustard seed, Two ounces of celery seed.

Peel and slice the cucumbers, onions, tomatoes and peppers.

Salt them separately and let them stand overnight.

The next morning press them dry and chop very fine.

Then add the spices, ground pepper, celery seed and to every gallon of mixture put a pound of brown sugar.

Cover with good vinegar, stir well and boil five minutes.

Put in jars and cover tightly.

SWEET CANTELOUPE PICKLE

One gallon of good cider vinegar, Five pounds of white sugar, Half an ounce of ground mace, Two ounces of ground cloves, Two ounces of ground cinnamon, Two ounces of ground allspice, The peelings of three oranges.

Take cantaloupes that are just beginning to ripen, remove the rinds and throw away the seeds.

Cut the rinds into narrow slices and put them into stone jars.

Fill a kettle with two thirds vinegar and one third water and add a piece of alum the size of a partridge egg.

Boil it five minutes and, while hot, pour it over the melon.

Let this stand thirteen or fourteen hours, take out the melon and throw away the vinegar.

While the melon is draining, put the spices and vinegar on to boil for ten minutes and, while hot, pour over the melon.

Every morning boil this vinegar over for three mornings and the last time put the melon in the kettle and boil until tender.

Put into jars and seal while hot.

These proportions can be increased according to the quantity of melon to be pickled.

TO PICKLE MUSHROOMS

Nine quarts of mushrooms, One tablespoon of ground mace, One dessertspoonful of ground cloves, One dessertspoonful of ground allspice, One teaspoon of cayenne pepper, One tablespoon of black pepper, One teaspoon of salt.

Wash and peel the mushrooms, then put them in the jars in which they are to be kept. As you put them in,sprinkle spices over each . Cover them with boiling vinegar, ie them up tightly and in two weeks they will be ready for use.

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE

One peck of green tomatoes, Three tablespoons of dry mustard, One ounce of yellow mustard seed, An ounce and a half of whole black pepper, One ounce of whole cloves, One ounce of whole allspice, One dozen white onions, Half a pound of brown sugar.

Slice the tomatoes thin, sprinkle them with salt and let them stand overnight.

The next morning drain them through a colander, peel and slice the onions.

Put into the kettle in the following order: First, a layer of tomatoes and onions, then seed and spices and so on until all are in the kettle.

Mix the mustard with a quart of vinegar and the sugar and pour over the tomatoes.

Add more vinegar until they are covered.

Place the kettle over the fire and boil twenty minutes.

Put in stone jars and cover tightly with paper.

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE II

One peck of green tomatoes, Six large white onions, One teacup full of salt, Four quarts of cider vinegar, Two pounds of brown sugar, Half a pound of ground mustard, Two tablespoons of ground cloves, Two tablespoons of ground ginger, Two tablespoons of ground cinnamon, One tablespoon of celery seed, Six green bull nose peppers.

Slice the onions and tomatoes; sprinkle the salt over them and let them stand overnight.

Drain well in the morning.

Take two quarts of water and one of vinegar, boil the tomatoes and onions in it for five minutes and drain again through a colander.

Then take the four quarts of vinegar and put in it the tomatoes, onions, spices and chopped pepper.

Boil fifteen minutes and put in stone jars.

This will keep well for a year.

CHOW-CHOW

Two large heads of cauliflower, One quart of sliced cucumbers, Half a pint of mixed English mustard, One tablespoon of cayenne pepper, One tablespoon of black pepper, Three ounces of turmeric.

Cut the cauliflower and cucumbers into small, nicely-shaped pieces and put them into brine for twenty-four hours.

Drain through a colander for an hour or two.

Put them in a kettle. Cover with vinegar, in which two teaspoons of celery seed has been previously boiled for twenty minutes and strained. Let the vegetables simmer with the spices in the vinegar until perfectly tender, stirring well all the time. Put into wide-mouthed jars and tie up closely.

It would be well to put a piece of alum, the size of a hickory nut, into each jar to keep the pickle from getting soft.

CUCUMBER CHOW-CHOW

One gallon of peeled chopped cucumbers. Five chopped green peppers, Four chopped onions, One tablespoon of whole black pepper, One tablespoon of whole allspice, One tablespoon of whole cloves, Four teaspoons of ground mustard, Half a pound of grated horseradish, Half a pint of black mustard seed, Two teaspoons of celery seed.

After peeling and chopping the onions, cucumbers and green peppers, sprinkle them with salt and let them stand overnight.

In the morning press out the salt and put into stone jars.

Take a gallon of vinegar, put in all the above ingredients, except the horseradish, which should be mixed with the cucumbers in the jars.

Boil ten minutes and when cold pour over the cucumbers.

CABBAGE PICKLE

One dozen firm heads of cabbage, Half a teacup full of ground ginger, Two tablespoons of allspice, One dozen small green pepper pods, One teacup full of white mustard seed, Two ounces of turmeric.

Quarter the cabbage heads, cover them with brine and let them stand for twenty-four hours.

In the morning press dry and let them stand for a day.

Put them in a kettle with the spices, cover with cider vinegar and boil until tender.

Put them into wide mouth jars and tie up closely.

They will be ready for use the next day.

Be sure to cover them well with vinegar after putting them in the jars.

SPICED PEACHES

One peck of peeled peaches, Three pounds and a half of brown sugar, Three pints of cider vinegar, Half an ounce of nutmeg, One ounce of cloves, One ounce of cinnamon.

After peeling the peaches, put them into a stone jar.

Break up the spices and strew them through the peaches.

Boil the sugar and vinegar together for ten minutes and pour over the peaches while very hot.

Repeat this for three consecutive days, then boil all together for ten minutes.

Plums can be done the same way, only don’t put in quite so much vinegar.

PEACH MANGOES

One peck of peaches, A quarter of a pound of white mustard seed, A quarter of a pound of black mustard seed, Two tablespoons of turmeric, One tablespoon of cloves, Four tablespoons of sweet oil, Two tablespoons of celery seed or chopped celery, Two chopped red peppers, Two chopped onions.

Get the peaches two-thirds ripe and throw them into strong salt and water for twelve hours.

Wipe them dry, cut them in half, take out the stones and put in the filling made of the above ingredients.

Sew them up and pour cold vinegar over them.

Put them in stone jars and cover tightly.

STUFFING FOR FORTY MELONS

Half a pound of ground race ginger, One pound of scraped horseradish, One pound of white mustard seed, One pound of chopped onion, One ounce of ground mace, One ounce of grated nutmeg, Half a coffee cup full of black pepper grains, One tablespoon of celery seed, A quarter of a pound of ground mustard, Two ounces of turmeric.

Select the melons a size larger than a goose egg.

Pour boiling salt and water on them and let them stand one night.

The next morning make a slit from the stem to the blossom end and take out all the seeds with great care.

Return them to the brine and let them remain six days, then put them in the best cider vinegar and let them remain for ten days.

Wipe out the insides and stuff in the following manner:

Mix the above ingredients to a paste, with a pint of the best salad oil.

Fill each melon well with it, putting in each a small clove of garlic.

Tie tightly, pack them in a stone jar and put a little of the stuffing over each layer; also a piece of alum the size of a hickory nut and keep well covered, with the best cider vinegar.

TOMATO CATSUP

Two bushels of ripe tomatoes, Half a peck of onions, One teacup full of salt, One teacup full of whole allspice, Half a teacup full of ground cloves, One teacup full of black pepper grains, One tablespoon of ground mace, Two tumblerfuls of Madeira wine, One dessertspoonful of celery seed, Cayenne pepper to the taste, Three grated nutmegs.

“Wash the tomatoes well and cut in slices a half an inch thick.

Peel the onions and slice thin.

Put them in a preserving kettle, with the salt, on the fire and let them boil slowly for three hours, taking care to stir frequently.

Mash through a sieve with a wooden ladle and pour into a stone jar to stand overnight.

The next morning, return to the preserving kettle, with the spices and wine and simmer until thick, then mash again through a sieve with the wooden ladle and bottle and seal well.

TOMATO CATSUP— No. 2

One bushel of full ripe tomatoes, Two quarts of good cider vinegar, One ounce of whole allspice, One ounce of whole cloves, Half a pound of dry mustard, Two pounds of brown sugar, Three teaspoons of celery seed, One ounce of cayenne pepper, One quart of salt.

Slice the tomatoes a half an inch thick and salt in layers until all are salted down.

Let them stand overnight and in the morning press them through a colander.

Put them to boil with the spices, vinegar, sugar, mustard, salt and celery seed, for three hours and a half.

Press through a colander, then through a sieve and seal very tight in bottles.

Six onions, peeled and cut up, might be added.

GREEN TOMATO CATSUP

Three gallons of green tomatoes, One gallon of good cider vinegar, Three pounds of brown sugar, Four tablespoons of dry mustard, Four tablespoons of ground allspice. Four tablespoons of ground ginger, Four tablespoons of ground cinnamon, Four tablespoons of ground cloves, Four tablespoons of celery seed, Four green bull nose peppers, Black pepper to the taste.

Peel and slice the tomatoes and peppers, pack them with layers of salt and put them in colanders to drain overnight.

Press dry the next morning and put them in the kettle with the above ingredients.

Boil all together until thick and add a quart of cold vinegar.

Cover tightly and it will keep for years.

CUCUMBER CATSUP

One peck of full-grown cucumbers, Two large onions, Half a pint of salt, Six blades of mace, A gill of Madeira wine, A gill of sweet oil, A teaspoon of cayenne pepper A teaspoon of ground black pepper.

Peel the cucumbers and cut them in thin slices.

Cover them with the half pint of salt, to draw out the water and let them stand six hours.

Cut the onions also in thin slices and put them in stone jars, in alternate layers with the cucumbers, pepper and blades of mace, broken very fine.

Stir the oil and wine in the vinegar and pour over the cucumbers cold.

CHILI SAUCE

One dozen large ripe tomatoes, Six tablespoons of brown sugar, Four teacups of vinegar, Two teaspoons of ground cinnamon, Two teaspoons of ground ginger, One teaspoon of ground cloves, One tablespoon of mixed mustard, One red pepper pod, Four large white onions, Salt to the taste.

Peel and slice the tomatoes, chop the onions very fine; put in the other ingredients and boil slowly for two hours.

Rub through a sifter and seal in bottles or glass jars.

Keep in a cool place in the summer, but not too cold a place in the winter.

This is delicious on cold meats or fried oysters.

TOMATO SAUCE

Two pecks of full ripe tomatoes, One quart of salt.

Cut each tomato in two or three slices, but do not peel them.

Put them in a kettle in layers, salting each layer well.

Let them simmer slowly three hours; strain them through a colander, then return to the kettle to simmer slowly for an hour longer.

When scalding hot, pour into bottles and seal hermetically.

This is delicious for steaks, chops, sweetbreads or soups.

VENETIAN PICKLE

Four quarts of cider vinegar, Four tablespoons of white mustard seed, Four tablespoons of turmeric, Four tablespoons of whole black pepper Three tablespoons of whole allspice, Four tablespoons of crushed stick cinnamon, Four cloves of garlic.

Take anything you wish to pickle, cabbage, onions and green peppers; cut them up and cover with salt, vinegar and two tablespoons of turmeric.

Let them stand twenty-four hours, stirring them carefully three or four times.

Take them off, dry them well in a cloth and put them into a bowl.

Put the vinegar, etc., into a kettle, boil all well together and when cool, pour over the pickles.

In two days they will be fit for use.

CELERY VINEGAR

Two tablespoons of celery seed, One quart of vinegar.

Pound the celery seed in a mortar and put it into a quart bottle with the vinegar poured over it.

Shake it well every day for two weeks, then strain and keep it for use, as it will impart a pleasant flavor of celery to everything in which it is used.

A delicious flavor of thyme or summer savory can be obtained by gathering it when it is in full perfection.

Pick enough from the stalk to make a teacup full, put it in a bottle and pour on it a quart of strong vinegar.

The next day take out the thyme or savory, put in another teacup full; do this three times.

Strain, bottle and seal tightly.

This will be much more pleasant than the dried herb and can be used when the fresh is out of season.

Mint can be prepared in the same way.

Great care must be taken not to allow the herbs to remain in the liquor longer than twenty hours, or the taste will be bitter and disagreeable.

FRENCH MUSTARD

A quarter of a pound of Coleman’s English mustard, Half a pint of water, Half a pint of vinegar, A tablespoon of flour, A teaspoon of pulverized sugar, A saltspoonful of salt.

Put the mustard in a saucepan and pour over it the vinegar and water.

Add the salt and a pinch of calamus root the size of a pea.

Put it on the fire and when it is boiling add the flour.

Let it boil twenty minutes, stirring all the time.

Just before taking it off stir in the sugar.

When cool, put it in small wide-mouth bottles and cork tightly.

TO PREPARE HORSERADISH

Wash the horseradish clean and let it lie in cold water for about an hour, then scrape into very fine shreds with a sharp knife.

Put into a wide-mouth bottle, cover with vinegar and cork tightly.

ANOTHER WAY

Wash and prepare as above, as much as you wish to keep for a while.

Grate very fine and put in as much vinegar as it will absorb.

Put into a wide-mouth bottle and cork tightly.

Every three or four days add a little vinegar to it, so as to make it keep fresh.

This is very nice with roast beef, beefsteaks and any kind of cold meat.

MENUS FOR BREAKFASTS, LUNCHES & DINNERS

SPRING BREAKFAST No. 1

Fruit Broiled Shad — Tartare Sauce, Saratoga Potatoes. Broiled Lamb Chops and Peas, Hot Rolls. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Sweetbreads and Champignons. Broiled Snipe on Toast.

SPRING BREAKFAST— No. 2

Fruit. Broiled Salmon — Melted Butter Sauce, Stewed Potatoes, Hot Pounded Biscuits. Broiled Chickens — Champignons, Hot Rolls. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Breaded Lamb Chops and Peas, Hot Muffins. Dressed Tomatoes

SUMMER BREAKFAST— No. 1

Fruit. Broiled Trout — Tartare Sauce, Saratoga Potatoes, Hot Rolls. Spring Chickens, Broiled Tomatoes. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Breaded Chops with Peas, Hot Pounded Biscuits.

SUMMER BREAKFAST— No. 2

Fruit. Broiled Salmon, Potatoes cut in dice and Fried. Small Broiled Fillets of Beef with Truffles, Hot Rolls. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Sweetbreads Stewed with Cream, Hot Pounded Biscuits.

SUMMER BREAKFAST— No. 3

Canteloupes. Broiled Chicken, Hot Rolls, Corn Fritters. Lamb Chops — Hot Biscuits, Boiled Tomatoes. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Ham Omelette. Peaches and Cream.

FALL BREAKFAST— No. 1

Broiled White Fish, Plain Omelette. Broiled Doves on Toast, Hot Rolls. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Waffles, Golden Syrup.

FALL BREAKFAST— No. 2

Fruit. Small Fillets of Beef — Champignons, Broiled Tomatoes. — Rolls. Fried Oysters. — Pounded Biscuits. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Reed Birds on Toast, Fried Potatoes.

WINTER BREAKFAST— No. 1

Fruit. Lamb Chops and Peas, Hot Rolls. Small Broiled Fillets of Beef — Champignons, Hot Pounded Biscuits. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Buckwheat Cakes, Golden Syrup.

WINTER BREAKFAST— No. 2

Fruit. Beefsteak with Champignons, Hot Pounded Biscuits, Omelette with Herbs. Quail on Toast. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Terrapins, Hot Rolls.

WINTER BREAKFAST— No. 3

Fruit. Broiled Kennebec Salmon Steaks, Scalloped Potatoes, Hot Rolls. Fried Oysters — Rolled Bread. Coffee and English Breakfast Tea. Broiled Sweetbreads, Tomato Sauce, Biscuits. Omelet with Parmesan Cheese.

SPRING LUNCH— No. 1

Clear Soup. Fish, Sauce a la Hollandaise, Scalloped Potatoes. Baked Sweetbreads, Green Peas. Frozen Punch. Quenelles with Truffles. Tomato Salad — Mayonnaise Dressing. Ice Cream and Strawberries — Cakes. Coffee.

SPRING LUNCH— No. 2

Green Pea Soup with Small Pieces of Toast. Baked Fish — Tartare Sauce, Stewed Potatoes. Breaded Lamb Chops, Champignon Sauce. Frozen Punch. Snipe on Toast. Creme de Volaille. Lettuce Salad. Macaroon Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

SUMMER LUNCH— No. 1

Clear Soup — Parmesan Cheese. Broiled Salmon Steaks — Tartare Sauce. Chicken a la Curry. Frozen Punch. Sweetbreads in Shells. Tomato Salad. Raspberry Ice Cream — Cakes. Chocolate.

SUMMER LUNCH— No. 2

FOR SMALL LUNCH. White Soup. Broiled Chickens — Truffle Sauce. Roman Punch. Croquettes — Tomato Sauce. Lettuce Salad. Ice Cream — Cakes. Coffee.

FALL LUNCH— No. 1

Oysters on the Half Shell. White Soup. Boiled Fish — Egg Sauce, Potatoes. Fillet of Beef— Champignons. Roman Punch. Reed Birds. Chicken Salad. Vanilla Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

FALL LUNCH— No. 2

Lobster Soup. Broiled White Fish — Tartare Sauce. Broiled Chickens, Fresh Fall Mushrooms. Frozen Punch. Calf’s Head a la Terrapin. Reed Birds. Tomato Salad. Neapolitan Brick — Cakes. Candied Fruits Chocolate.

WINTER LUNCH— No. 1

Oysters on the Half Shell. White Soup. Quails with Truffles, Stewed Potatoes. Frozen Punch. Croquettes and Green Peas. Salad. Neapolitan Brick — Cakes. Coffee

WINTER LUNCH— No. 2

Clear Soup. Fish — Tartare Sauce, Potatoes a la Lyonnaise. Broiled Venison Steaks — Jelly, Baked Salsify. Frozen Punch. Baked Grouse — Brown Sauce. Salad. Orange Ice — Cakes. Candied Fruits. Coffee.

WINTER LUNCH— No. 3

White Soup, Sliced Almonds in it. Fish, in Shells. Quails Stuffed with Chestnuts. Oyster Patti. Frozen Punch. Creme de Volaille. Salad. Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

SPRING DINNER— No. 1

Green Pea Soup, small pieces of Fried Toast in it. Pompano Fish, Sauce a la Hollandaise, Mashed Potato. Croquettes— Champignon Sauce, Stewed Tomatoes. Orange Punch, dashed with Maraschino Cordial. Snipe on Toast. Dressed Lettuce. Cocoanut Pudding. Strawberry Ice Cream — Cakes. Jelly. Coffee.

SPRING DINNER— No. 2

White Soup. Boiled Lake Fish — Tartare Sauce, Potatoes Stewed in Cream. Chickens Dressed with Truffles, Asparagus. Roman punch. Fillet of Beef — Champignons, Spinach. Salad. Pudding. Pine Apple Sherbet — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

SPRING DINNER— No. 3

Okra Soup. Baked Shad — Tartare Sauce, Mashed Potatoes. Roast Lamb — Mint Sauce, Green Peas. Roman Punch. Fillet of Veal — Brown Sauce, Macaroni. Salad. Pudding— Cold Sauce. Lemon Sherbet. Fruit. Coffee.

SPRING DINNER— No. 4

Julienne Soup. Baked Fish — Tartare Sauce, Mashed Potatoes. Broiled Chicken — Champignon Sauce, Spinach. Roman Punch. Snipe on Toast. Salad. Cabinet Pudding. Neapolitan Brick — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

SUMMER DINNER— No. 1

Gumbo Soup. Baked Bass — Tartare Sauce, Potatoes Cut in Balls — Cream Sauce. Mutton — Caper Sauce, Cauliflower with Parmesan Cheese. Roman Punch. Sweetbreads in Shells. Salad. Lemon Pudding. Peach Ice Cream — Cakes. Charlotte Russe. Fruit. Coffee.

SUMMER DINNER— No. 2

Corn Soup. Boiled Salmon — Lobster Sauce, Cucumbers. Fillet of Beef — Champignons, Macaroni. Roman Punch. Chicken Croquettes with Truffles. Broiled Woodcock — Saratoga Potatoes. Shrimp Salad. Pudding. Lemon Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

SUMMER DINNER— No. 3

Lobster Soup. Boiled Sheep’s Head — Egg Sauce. Roast Lamb — Mint Sauce, Green Peas. Roman Punch. Fried Chicken — Cream Sauce, Egg — Plant Pudding. Croquettes — Tomato Sauce. Salad. Pudding — Cold Sauce. Raspberry Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

SUMMER DINNER— No. 4

Okra Soup. Boiled Fish — Shrimp Sauce. Fried Chicken — Cream Sauce, Cauliflower. Roman Punch. Fillet of Beef with Truffles, Corn Pudding. Creme de Volaille. Tomato Salad. Pudding — Cold Sauce. Lemon Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

SUMMER DINNER— No. 5

Vermicelli Soup. Broiled Salmon Steaks — Tartare Sauce, Potatoes. Sweet Breads — Green Peas. Roman Punch. Prairie Chickens. Salad. Pudding — Cold Sauce. Nesselrode Pudding — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

FALL DINNER— No. 1

Clear Soup with Parmesan Cheese. Boiled Salmon — Hot and Cold Sauce, Mashed Potatoes. Bouilli Beef, Stewed Tomatoes. Roman Punch. Chicken Croquettes. Salad. Cabinet Pudding. Neapolitan Brick — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

FALL DINNER— No. 2

White Soup. Boiled Rock Bass — Shrimp Sauce. Roast Chicken — Fresh Fall Mushrooms. Roman Punch. Lamb Chops, Stewed Tomatoes. Baked Sweet Breads — Champignons. Orange Pudding. Ice Cream — Cakes. Jelly. Fruit. Coffee.

FALL DINNER— No. 3

White Soup. Baked Bass — Tartare Sauce, Mashed Potatoes. Boiled Mutton — Caper Sauce. Pine Apple Punch. Sweet Breads in Shells. Broiled Grouse. Scalloped Tomatoes. Salad. Pudding — Hot Sauce. Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

FALL DINNER— No. 4

Oyster Gumbo. Boiled Fish — Sauce a la Hollandaise, Baked Mashed Potatoes. Reed Birds, Macaroni. Roman Punch. Croquettes — Champignon Sauce. Celery Salad. Pudding. Vanilla Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

WINTER DINNER— No. 1

Oysters on the Half Shell. Clear Soup. Broiled Kennebec Salmon, garnished with Fried Oysti Tartare Sauce. Saddle of Mutton — Wine and Jelly Sauce. Pine Apple Punch of St. Croix Rum. Roasted Pheasants, Saratoga Potatoes. Mayonnaise. Plum Pudding. Individual Ices — Small Cakes. Candied Fruits. Coffee.

WINTER DINNER— No. 2

Oysters on the Half Shell. Calf’s Head Soup. Fish. Red Snapper — Sauce a la Hollandaise, Macaroni. Roman Punch. Creme de Volaille with Champignons. Salad. Cabinet Pudding. Neapolitan Brick — Cakes. Jelly. Coffee.

WINTER DINNER— No. 3

Oysters on the Half Shell. White Soup. Boiled Fish — Tartare Sauce, Mashed Potatoes. . Roast Turkey Stuffed with Chestnuts, Stewed Celery. Roman Punch. Terrapins. Roast Quails with Champignons. Salad. Plum Pudding. Ice Cream — Cakes. Charlotte Russe. Fruit. Coffee.

WINTER DINNER— No. 4

Oysters on the Half -shell. Clear Soup. Boiled Fish — Shrimp Sauce, Baked Mashed Potatoes. Fillet of Beef with Champignons. Roman Punch. Boudins a la Richelieu Truffle Sauce. Pate de Fois Gras in Aspec Jelly. Salad. Pudding — Hot Sauce. Macaroon Ice Cream — Cakes. Jelly. Coffee.

WINTER DINNER— No. 5

Oyster Soup. Boiled Fish— Egg Sauce, Mashed Potatoes. Quails Stuffed with Chestnuts, Macaroni. Roman Punch. Quenelles with Sauce. Salad. Vanilla Ice Cream — Cakes. Fruit. Coffee.

WINTER DINNER— No. 6

Oysters on the Half -shell. Clear Soup — Cream Celery Soup. Kennebec Salmon — Sauce a la Hollandaise — Tartare Sauce, Potatoes cut in little balls — Cream Sauce. Fillet of Beef with Truffles. Roman Punch. Creme de Volaille— Champignons. Terrapins. Quails Stuffed with Chestnut. Macaroni. Salad. Plum Pudding. Charlotte Russe. Fruit. Coffee.

WINTER SUPPER— No. 1

A supper of twelve persons to be served at one table and in courses. Oysters in the Shell. Venison — Wine Sauce. Sweet Breads and Peas. Pheasant Breasts — Truffle Sauce,. Salad. Ice Cream. Fruit. Coffee.

WINTER SUPPER— No. 2

Is to be served as No 1, at one table. Oysters in the Shell. Sweet bread Pattis. Tarrapins. Salad Ice cream. Fruit. Coffee.

No. 1. Winter suppers for twenty-five or thirty persons, to be served in courses, at small tables.

No. 1.Oyster Patties. Sweet Breads and Champignons. Chicken Croquettes and Peas. Salad. Ice Cream. Coffee.

No. 2. Is to be served as No. 1, at small tables. Terrapins. Creme de Volaille. Oyster Croquettes. Salad. Ice Cream. Coffee.

FOOD IN SEASON

Food in season for the months not given, are the same as those given

DECEMBER

FISH

Salmon, codfish, shrimps, lobsters, black bass, rockfish, hard-shell crabs and oysters.

MEATS

Beef, mutton, pork and veal.

POULTRY AND GAME

Turkeys, geese, ducks, chickens, wild turkey, canvas- back ducks, teal, mallard, quails, pheasants, venison, grouse and terrapin.

VEGETABLES

Potatoes, sweet potatoes, squashes, turnips, carrots, parsnips, celery, spinach, cabbage, onions and salsify.

FRUITS

Apples, pears, grapes, cranberries, oranges and figs

FEBRUARY

FISH

Rock fish, perch, smelts, red snapper, lobsters and oysters.

MEATS

Beef, mutton, fresh pork, sausages and ham.

POULTRY AND GAME

Turkeys, ducks, geese, chickens, canvas-back ducks, terrapin, teal.

VEGETABLES

White and sweet potatoes, turnips, parsnips, salsify, celery, winter spinach, cabbages

FRUITS

Apples, grapes, bananas, lemons, oranges and figs.

MARCH

FISH Shad, rock fish, black bass, salmon, smelts, white fish, codfish, lobsters, red snapper, hard shell crabs and oysters.

MEATS Beef, mutton and ham

POULTRY AND GAME Capons, ducks, chickens, canvas-back ducks, teal and terrapin.

VEGETABLES Potatoes, sweet potatoes, southern tomatoes, spinach, salsify, lettuce and radishes.

FRUITS Oranges, apples, figs and southern strawberries

APRIL

FISH Shad, black bass, fresh mackerel, white fish lobsters, red snapper, hard shell crabs and oysters.

MEATS Beef, mutton and spring lamb.

POULTRY AND GAME Spring chickens, capons, ducks, chickens and snipe.

VEGETABLES New potatoes, asparagus, southern peas, lettuce south- ern cucumbers, spinach, southern tomatoes, spring onions, leeks and radishes.

FRUIT Oranges, southern strawberries, apples, cranberries and figs.

MAY

FISH White fish, shad, white perch, fresh mackerel, salmon, pike, lobsters, red snapper, brook trout and hard shell crabs.

MEATS Beef; spring lamb and veal.

POULTRY AND GAME Spring chickens, capons and snipe. VEGETABLES New potatoes, asparagus, peas, lettuce, cucumbers, southern tomatoes, cauliflowers, spinach, onions, leeks, radishes and mint.

FRUITS Apples, oranges, figs, cherries and southern straw- berries.

JUNE

FISH Spanish mackerel, trout, rock fish, salmon, sea bass, red snapper, white fish, blue fish, lobsters, hard and soft shell crabs.

MEATS Beef, spring lamb and veal.

POULTRY AND GAME Spring chickens and snipe.

VEGETABLES New potatoes, peas, lettuce, cucumbers, southern tomatoes, southern squashes, cauliflowers, cabbage, spinach, string beans, beets, water cresses, carrots, radishes, leeks and mint.

FRUITS Oranges, strawberries, raspberries and cherries.

JULY

FISH Sheepshead, blue fish, Spanish, mackerel, trout, halibut, salmon, lobsters, hard and soft shell crabs.

MEATS Beef, spring lamb and veal.

POULTRY AND GAME Spring chickens and woodcock. VEGETABLES Potatoes, peas, mushrooms, green corn, tomatoes, cu- cumbers, eggplant, squashes, cauliflowers, lima beans, string beans, beets, leeks, water cresses and mint.

FOR PICKLING Cucumbers, red cabbages, cauliflowers and nasturtiums.

FRUITS Peaches, raspberries, blackberries, cherries, gooseberries, mulberries, apricots, plums, nectarines, greengages, damsons and melons.

AUGUST

FISH Sheepshead, Spanish mackerel, fresh mackerel, trout, perch, sea bass, hard and soft shell crabs.

MEATS Beef, mutton, lamb and veal.

POULTRY AND GAME Spring chicken, woodcock, plover and prairie chickens.

VEGETABLES Potatoes, mushrooms, green-corn, tomatoes, squashes, eggplant, beets, carrots, celery, spinach, cabbage, cauli- flowers, Lima beans, onions, garlic, mint and watercresses.

FOR PICKLING

Green tomatoes, cabbage, bull-nose peppers, onions and cauliflowers.

FRUIT Pears, grapes, peaches, blackberries, apricots, nectarines, greengages, damsons, quinces and melons.

SEPTEMBER

FISH Spanish mackerel, bluefish, sheepshead, salmon, halibut, sea bass, clams, lobsters, hard and soft shell crabs and oysters.

MEATS Beef, mutton, lamb and veal.

POULTRY AND GAME Chickens, prairie chickens, reed birds, woodcock, teal; terrapin commences its season the latter part of September.

VEGETABLES Potatoes, green-corn, mushrooms, tomatoes, squashes, carrots, celery, Lima beans, cabbage, onions, garlic, mint, water-cresses and leeks.

FOR PICKLING White cabbage, cucumbers, white onions, green tomatoes and string beans.

FRUITS Apples, pears, grapes, peaches, plums, nectarines, dam- sons, oranges, melons and quinces.

HOUSEHOLD NOTES

A COMPOUND TO WASH WITH

Cut six pounds of soap into thin pieces; pour on a gallon of water and boil until the soap is thoroughly dissolved. Then add one ounce of powdered borax, a half a pint of ammonia and boil five minutes longer, stirring well all the time.

HOW TO USE THE COMPOUND To one ordinary size tubful of water, add a small teacup full of the compound. Soak the clothes in it overnight and in the morning wash them out. Put them in the boiler and while boiling, add another teacup full of the compound. Rinse well and dry. This will take out all the grease and dirt; also saves labor, as well as the hard rubbing of the clothes. Be sure not to wash the clothes in the compound; only soak and boil them in it.

SOAP

Boil one gallon and a half of rainwater; shave into it, as fine as possible, five pounds of Opodeldoc Soap; stir until thoroughly dissolved, then add a half a pound of sal soda, one tablespoon of alcohol and one tablespoon of ammonia. Boil five minutes, stirring hard all the time. Put into a stone jar.

TO MAKE SOFT SOAP

Put to soak overnight a box of chemical lye, into six quarts of water. The next morning put it on to boil and by degrees, add five pounds of grease. Boil two hours and a half, then stir in two quarts at the time, a gallon and a half of hot water, three tablespoons of ammonia and a wineglassful of salt. Boil twenty minutes longer and add three tablespoons of myrrhbane, which is intended to give to the soap a pleasant perfume. Pour into large wide mouth stone jars and if too stiff, add cold water until the consistency of thick honey.

BORAX SOAP FOR BLEACHING CLOTHES

Put one ounce of pulverized borax into eight quarts of water and let it boil. While boiling, cut up three pounds of soap into very small pieces and boil all together ten minutes. Put into a stone jar and keep for use.

TO MAKE A WHITEWASH

Slack one barrel and a half of lime in hot water and keep it covered tightly until you are ready to mix it. Then fill the barrel about half full of hot water; stir in one quart of dissolved glue, a pound and a half of melted tallow and a half a peck of salt; mix well. To color it, take lamp black and alcohol and stir in until you get it the right color. It will be necessary to try it frequently, giving it time to dry, so as not to have it too dark. After it is thoroughly mixed, it should be strained and racked off into a new barrel, then it will be ready for use. This will be found equal to paint.

TO CLEAN BRASS

Brass, when corroded and blackened, may be cleaned with rottenstone, moistened with oxalic acid and a little water. Polish with whiting or silicon powder.

TO CLEAN OLD MATTING

To clean and freshen old matting, rub it with a cloth dipped in salt and water, being careful not to allow any drops of water to dry in the matting, or they will leave spots difficult to remove.

TO REMOVE GREASE FROM TIN

A few drops of ammonia will be effectual in removing grease from the dishpan and it is a good plan, once in a while, to pursue the same course in cleansing the sink.

FOR CLEANSING SILK

Pare and slice three Irish potatoes; pour on them half a pint of boiling water and add the same quantity of pure alcohol. Sponge the silk on the right side and when half dry iron on the wrong side. This will clean light colored silks as well as black silks, also cloth and crape.

ANOTHER WAY TO CLEAN BLACK SILK

To one tumbler of beer, put two tumblerfuls of water. Sponge the silk well on each side; roll together and leave it so for an hour. Then iron on the wrong side, until perfectly dry.

TO CLEAN OIL CLOTH

A dingy old oil cloth, can be brightened up by putting into a gallon of clear water, a teaspoon of powdered borax. After it is dissolved, wipe it with a flannel cloth, which you have previously dipped in milk; wring it as dry as possible and wipe well again.

TO CLEAN CARPETS

Put into a bucket six pints of very hot water; make a good thick soapsuds of it and add two tablespoons of ammonia. First dampen the carpet by dipping a sponge in the suds, then soap it well. Scrub with a brush if very dirty; if not, wash thoroughly with the sponge and wipe dry. If any of the colors should be doubtful, put a tablespoon of ox gall in, at the same time you put in the ammonia. Use aqua ammonia.

TO STIFFEN COLLARS AND CUFFS

Put a small lump of borax in a wineglassful of hot water, mix in it some cold white starch; have the things dry before starching, then starch well only once. Place the collars and cuffs snugly in a towel, with a fold of it beneath each row. Roll up each shirt tightly; have a polishing iron ready and iron at once very quickly. It should be very hot and if kept moving rapidly will not scorch. Each article, as finished, must be placed close to the fire. It is best to lay the cuffs and collars on a tray and place the shirts close to the fire, so as to stiffen them. The borax gives the glaze.

REMOVE INK AND FRUIT STAINS

Ten grains of oxalic acid, in a half a pint of water, will remove all ink and fruit stains. Wet the article in hot water and apply it to the top of the bottle, so the liquid will reach well, then rinse it.

ANOTHER WAY TO REMOVE FRUIT STAINS

Fruit stains can be removed by putting the article stained into boiling water and leaving it there for ten minutes. Then wash it out in the usual way.

TO REMOVE DRY PAINT FROM ARTICLES

Dry paint is removed by dipping a swab with a handle in a strong solution of oxalic acid. It softens at once. A common lye of wood-ashes, will soften hard putty in a few minutes. If a door does not shut well, put a drop of sweet oil on the catch, or on the hinge, if it creaks. Soap will also have the same effect, but the oil is better in case there should be any rust. If there is rust on a flat iron, or other roughness, put some fine salt on a board and rub the iron rapidly on it until it moves smoothly.

TO SET COLORS

Put into an ordinary-size bucketful of water, a teaspoon of sugar of lead and let it dissolve thoroughly. Soak the article in it for a half an hour, then wash it out.

TO TEST EGGS

Dissolve an ounce of salt in two ounces of water and put the eggs in it. The good eggs will sink and the bad ones will float.

TO REMOVE A STOPPER

If a glass stopper will not move, hold the neck of the bottle to a flame, or warm it by taking two turns of a string and see-saw it; the heat engendered expands the neck of the bottle, before a corresponding expansion reaches the stopper.

FOR PLANTS

A weak solution of ammonia scattered over the leaves of plants, from a fine limber brush, gives new life to plants. Even if a little is sprinkled over the earth at their roots, their growth is invigorated.

TO WASH FURNITURE

First wash off the furniture with cold water; wipe dry, then have ready three pints of boiling soapsuds, to which add a wineglassful of sweet oil; apply this, as you would water, with a soft sponge and let it dry on the furniture. If you attempt to wipe it with a cloth, it will make it dull. Just dip the sponge and squeeze it out after applying it.

TOOTH POWDER

A half an ounce of cuttlefish bone; half an ounce of the finest prepared chalk; two drachms of Peruvian bark; two drachms of Florentine orris root. Reduce the whole to a fine powder and mix.

TO MAKE COLD CREAM

Shave one tablespoon of spermaceti and one of white wax, very fine and put into a saucepan with hot water underneath. Keep the water under the mixture steadily boiling and stir gently all the time, until the mixture is the consistency of rich cream; then add the oil and stir a few minutes longer. Just as you remove this from the fire, add two drops of genuine attar of roses and put away for use in a small pot covered with kid.

A WASH FOR THE HAIR

Put a teaspoon of powdered borax, with half a teaspoon of powdered gum camphor in a quart of boiling watere. Let it stand for a few minutes, then bottle. When using it, shake well before rubbing on the hair.

ANOTHER WAY TO CLEANSE THE HAIR

A half teaspoon of powdered borax in a teacup full of water, makes a mild and efficient hair and scalp cleanser. Rub it into the hair and scalp with the balls of the fingers, with the head held over a basin and the eyes kept shut, until the entire scalp is in a foam, then rinse with warm water.

A HAIR TONIC

Scald two ounces of black tea in one gallon of boiling water; add three ounces of glycerine, one quart of bay rum and half an ounce of the tincture of cantharides; scald for five minutes longer; strain and bottle. This will prevent the hair from falling out and at the same time will stimulate a new and healthy growth.

CAMPHOR ICE

Heat two ounces of almond oil, then melt one ounce of white wax and two ounces of the best spermaceti and stir in; lastly, add one ounce of liquid camphor; stir well and put into a small jar with kid over it.

INDEX

Breakfast

Coffee 9

Tea 9

Hot Chocolate 10

Breads

First Yeast 11

Second Yeast 11

Potato Yeast 12

To Make Bread 12

Baking Powder Biscuits 13

Baking Powder Flannel Cakes 13

Bread or Rolls 14

Bread Cakes 14

Buckwheat Cakes 15

Buckwheat Cakes II 15

Cook Corn Grits 16

Corn Meal Batter Cakes 16

Corn Meal Muffins 17

Corn Meal Mush 17

Corn Meal Mush Batter Cakes 17

Cream Biscuits 18

Cook Crushed Indian 18

English Muffins 18

French Rolls 19

German Waffles 19

Good Egg Bread 19

Good Rusks 20

Graham Bread 20

Graham Muffins 20

Hominy Meal Muffins 21

Light Biscuits 21

Light Rolls 22

Loaf Bread w/o Lard 22

Muffins 23

Muffins on a Griddle 23

Oatmeal Batter Cakes 24

Cook Oat Flakes 24

Oatmeal Grits 24

Popovers 25

Potato Biscuit 25

Potato Cakes 26

Potato Rolls 26

Pounded Biscuits 27

Pounded Biscuit II 27

Rice Flannel Cakes 27

Rice Muffins 28

Rice Muffins w/ Corn Meal 28

Rice Waffles 28

Rolls 29

Rosettes 29

Sally Lunn 29

Salt Rising Bread 30

Spanish Buns 30

Waffles 30

Waffles II 31

Waffles III 32

Yeast Flannel Cakes 32

Yeast Muffins 33

Yeast Waffles 33

Additional Breakfast Courses

Beef

Dry Beef Hash 34

To Cook Sausages 34

Sausage Meat 34

Sausage Meat II 35

Sausage Meat III 35

To Cook Steak 36

To Cook Steak II 36

Beef Stew for Breakfast 37

Eggs

To Boil Eggs 37

Eggs w/ Cheese 38

Omelette 38

Small Omelletes 39

To Poach Eggs 39

To Preserve Eggs 40

Ham

To Devil Ham 40

Ham Omelette 41

Lamb

Chops 41

Mutton or Beef Stew 42

Cold Mutton Hash 42

Tongue Toast 43

Turkey

Hash 43

Hash II 44

Hash II 44

Veal Hash 44

Welsh Rare Bit 45

Welsh Rare Bit II 45

Offal

Calf

Calf’s Head Soup 46-47

Calf’s Head Soup II 48

Force Meat Balls for Calf’s Head Soup 48

Stuffed Calf’s Heart 49

Stuffed Calf’s Liver 49

Calf’s Head a la Terrapin 50

Fried Calf’s Head 51

Gravy for Calf’s Head 51

Brain in Shells 52

Hogs

To Fry Hog’s Brains 52

To Prepare Hog’s Brains 53

To Stew Hog’s Brains 53

To Boil Hog’s Feet 54

To Fry Hog’s Feet 54

To Stew Hog’s Feet 55

Sweetbreads

To Bake Sweetbreads 55

To Stew Sweetbreads w/ Cream 55

To Fry Sweetbreads 56

To Fry Sweetbreads II 56

To Cook Champignons w/ Sweetbreads 57

To Prepare Tripe 57

To Stew Tripe 58

Soups

For Coloring Soup 58

Asparagus 59

Beef Soup Stock 59

Black Soup 60

Cheap Black Soup 61

Black Soup II 62

Bouillon 63

Cabbage Soup 63

Cream Celery Soup 64

Chestnut Soup 64

Simple Chicken Soup 65

Chicken Soup for the Sick 65

White Chicken Consomme 66

Puree of Chicken 66

Clam Soup 67

Corn Soup 67

Green Pea Soup 68

Gumbo Soup 69

Julienne Soup 70

Leek Soup 70

Okra Soup 71

Cream Sago Soup 71

Soup a la Reine 72

Simple Soup Stock 72

Split Pea Soup 73

Tomato Soup 74

Tomato Soup II 74

Tomato Soup III 75

Mock Turtle Soup 73

Force Meat Balls for Mock Turtle Soup 76

Canned Turtle Soup 76

Canned Turtle Soup II 77

Turtle Bean Soup 78

Turtle Bean Soup II 79

Vegetable Soup 79

Vermicelli Soup 80

White Soup 81

Fish

Dress and Bake Fish 82

Clam Fritters 82

Codfish 83

Codfish Balls 84

Selecting Crabs 84

Recipe for Crabs 85

Frying Soft-Shell Crabs 85

Fricassee of Soft-Shell Crabs 86

Crab Gumbo Soup 86

To Devil Crabs 87

Cream Fish 87

Fry Fillets of Fish 88

To Fry Fish 88

Fish in Shells 89

Frying Frogs 89

Lobster Balls 90

Baked Lobster or Salmon 90

Lobster Chops 91

Sauce for Lobster Chops 92

Fricasse of Lobster 92

Lobster Soup 93

Oysters

Preparing Oysters 93

Boiled Oysters 94

To Feed Oysters in Shells 94

Oyster Croquettes 95

Pickled Oysters 96

Pickled Oysters II 96

Oyster Catsup 97

Fried Oysters 97

Fried Oysters II 98

Griddled Oysters 98

Oyster Gumbo 99

Oyster Patties 100

Scalloped Oysters 100

Scalloped Oysters II 101

Stewed Oysters 102

Oyster Soup 103

Vegetable Oyster Soup 104

Potato Soup 104

Boiled Pike 105

Red Snapper 106

Salmon Croquettes 106

Baked Shad 107

Fried Smelt 107

Broiled Spanish Mackerel 108

To Can Terrapins 108

Cooking and Dressing Terrapins 108

To Dress Terrapins 109

To Dress Terrapins II 110

Dressing for One Terrapin 110

Dressing One Terrapin II 111

Terrapin Dressing III 111

Egg Balls for Terrapins 112

Beef and Entrees

Observations 113-114

Aspec Jelly 115

Molding Aspec Jelly 115

Beef Bouilli 116

To Corn Beef 116

Boiling Corn Beef 117

Croquettes 118

Croquettes II 118

To Cook Fillet of Beef 119

Beef w/ Parsley 119

Roast Ribs of Beef 120

Beef Roll 120

Ham

Kentucky Recipe for Curing Ham 121

Boiled Ham 121

Baked Ham 122

Lamb

Roast Lamb 122

Boiled Marrow Bones 122

Mutton 123

Assorted Meats

Roast Pig 124

Quenelles 124

Rissole 125

Use Up Cold Roast Beef 126

Roast Sirloin or Beef 126

Rolled Steak 127

Tongue a la Mode 128

Roast Fillet of Veal 129

Veal Cutlets 130

Veal Loaf 130

Veal Loaf II 131

Veal Loaf III 131

Creme de Volaisle 132

Sauces for Meats

Sauce for Bouilli 133

Drawn Butter 133

Caper Sauce 134

Champignon Sauce 134

Sauce for Baked or Boiled Fish 134

Sauce a la Hollandaise for Fish 135

Tartare Sauce for Fish 135

Lobster Sauce 135

Brown Sauce for Meats 136

Mint Sauce 136

Sauce for Quenelles 136

Truffle Sauce 137

Tomato Sauce for Steaks and Chops 137

Cream Sauce for Boiled Turkey 138

Oyster Sauce for Boiled Turkey 138

White Sauce for Vegetables 139

Fowl and Game

Boiled Chicken 139

Fricassee of Chicken 140

Brown Fricassee of Chicken 141

Fried Chicken 142

Jambalaya of Chicken and Rice 142

Chicken Pie 143

Roast Chicken 143

Curry 144

To Cook Canvas Back Duck 144

Roast Duck 145

Roast Wild Duck 145

Roast Goose 146

Boiled Grouse 146

Broiled Prairie Chicken 147

Roast Quail 147

Broiled Quail 148

Quail and Truffles 148

Roast Reed Birds 148

Roast Snipe and Woodcock 149

Boiled Turkey 149

Sauce 150

Boudins a la Richelieu 150

Sauce 151

Roast Turkey 151

Turkey Stuffing 152

Chestnut Stuffing for Turkey 152

Oyster Stuffing for Turkey 152

Another Way to Roast and Stuff Turkey 153

Venison

Roast Venison 153

Broiled Venison Steak 154

Salads

Salad Dressing 155

Salad Dressing II 156

Salad Dressing III 156

Sweetbread Salad 157

Shrimp Salad 157

Cabbage and Celery Salad 158

Cole Slaw Dressing 158

Vegetables

Potatoes

Boil Potatoes 159

Bake Potatoes in Their Jackets 159

Mashed Potatoes 160

Bake Potatoes w/ Beef 160

Scalloped Potatoes 161

Stewed Potatoes 162

Saratoga Potatoes 163

Fried Potatoes 163

Potatoes a la Lyonnaise 164

Potatoes a la Parisienne 164

Potatoes a la Neige 165

Shoe-Fly Potatoes 165

Potato Croquettes 165

Potato Croquettes II 166

Tomatoes

Baked Sweet Potatoes 166

Fried Tomatoes 167

Stewed Tomatoes 167

Stuffed Tomatoes 167

Stuffed Tomatoes II 168

Baked Tomatoes w/o Stuffing 169

Scalloped Tomatoes 169

Boiled Cabbage 170

Fried Cabbage 170

Cooked Beets 171

Spinach 171

Asparagus Sauce 172

Summer Squash 172

Baked Cauliflower 173

Cauliflower w/ White Sauce 173

Cauliflower w/ Fried Chicken 174

Green Peas 174

Marrowfat Peas 175

Boiled Green Corn 175

Stewed Green Corn 175

Corn Pudding 176

Corn Pudding II 176

Corn Pudding III 176

Corn Fritters 177

Gumbo 177

Fried Eggplant 177

Eggplant Pudding 178

Fried Okra and Corn 178

Lima or Butter Beans 179

Snap Beans 179

Rice

Boiled Rice 180

Rice Croquettes 180

Rice Croquettes II 181

Stewed Celery 181

Fried Celery 182

Macaroni

Macaroni 182

Macaroni II 183

Macaroni II 183

Macaroni w/ White Sauce 184

Macaroni Sauce II 185

Stewed Onions w/ Cream 185

Boiled Onions 186

Burr Artichokes 186

Boiled Turnips 186

Turnips w/ White Sauce 187

Turnips w/ Brown Sauce 187

Stewed Salsify 188

Salsify Fritters 188

Baked Salsify 189

Boiled Parsnips 189

Parsnip Fritters 190

Parsnip Fritters II 190

Stewed Pumpkin 190

Baked Pumpkin 191

Hominy Fritters 191

Boiled Hominy 192

Hominy Puffs 192

Puddings and Pies

Apples

Prepare Apples for Pies 193

Prepare Apples for Pies II 193

Prepare Apples for Pies III 194

Apple Charlotte 194

Make Crust 195

Apple Charlotte II 195

Baked Apples 196

Fried Apples 196

Baked Apple Pudding 197

Apple Pudding II 197

Tapioca and Apples 197

Meringued Apples 198

Pastry 198

Puff Paste 199

Washington Pie 199

Cream for Washington Pie 200

Lemon Pies 200

Orange Pie 200

Braed Fritters 201

Bell Fritters 201

Spanish Fritters 202

French Fritters 202

Blanc Mange 202

Blanc Mange II 203

Snow Pudding 203

Custard for Snow Pudding 203

Snow Pudding II 204

Irish Potato Dumpling 204

Irish Potato Pudding 205

Sweet Potato Pie 205

Sweet Potato Pudding 206

Sweet Potato Pudding II 206

Brown Betty 207

Pancakes 207

Silver Cake Pudding 208

Sauce 208

Ginger Cake Pudding 208

Baked Indian Pudding 209

Boiled Indian Pudding 209

Rice Pudding 209

Rice Pudding II 210

Rice Pudding III 210

Rice and Cream Pudding 210

Cottage Pudding 211

Suet Pudding 211

Yankee Cake Pudding 212

Roly Poly Pudding 212

Feather Cake Pudding 213

Meringue Pudding 213

Fig Pudding 214

Coconut Pudding 214

Orange Pudding 215

Lemon Pudding 215

Transparent Pudding 216

A Simple Pudding 216

Boiled Bread Pudding 217

Boiled Bread Pudding II 217

Baked Bread Pudding 218

Baked Bread Pudding II 218

A Simple Baked Pudding 219

Nonpareil Pudding 219

Tapioca Pudding w/ Coconut 220

Pumpkin Pudding 220

Cake Pudding 221

Cornstarch Pudding 221

Chocolate Pudding 222

A Christmas Pudding 222

Ice Pudding 223

Cabinet Pudding 223

Sauce 224

Dutch Puffs 224

A Simple Plum Pudding 225

Poor Man’s Plum Pudding 225

English Plum Pudding 226

Mince Meat 227

Sauces for Puddings

Wine Sauce for Pudding 227

Pudding Sauce 228

Pudding Sauce II 228

Pudding Sauce III 229

Pudding Sauce IV 229

Hard Sauce for Pudding 229

Hard Sauce for Pudding II 230

Creams and Ices

Omlette Souffle 230

Charlotte Russe 231

Charlotte Russe II 231

Charlotte Russe III 232

Cream for Puffs 232

Egg Kisses 232

Cream Meringues 233

Apple Cream 233

Italian Cream 234

Spanish Cream 234

Bavaroise 234

Florence Cream 235

Ice Cream 235

Macaroon Ice Cream 236

Pineapple Cream 236

Vanilla Ice Cream 237

Nesselrode Pudding 237

Pineapple Ice 238

Frozen Sherbert 238

Orange Water Ice 238

Roman Punch 239

Frozen Custard w/ Fruit 239

Frozen Fruit Custard II 240

Jelly 240

Jelly II 241

Orange Jelly 241

Creme Diplomate 242

Angel’s Food 242

Bivavone 243

Chocolate Custard 243

Chocolate Custard II 244

Chocolate Custard III 244

Baked Custard 244

Lemon Custard for Pies 245

Vanilla Custard 245

Sponge Custard 246

Spanish Custard 246

Cakes and Cookies

Cake Directions 247

(For the inexperienced)

Cookies 247

Tea Cakes 247

Tea Cakes II 248

Tea Cakes III 248

Tea Cakes IV 248

Another Tea Cake Recipe 249

Doughnuts 249

Crullers 249

Crullers II 250

Coconut Cakes 250

Coconut Cakes II 250

Coconut Cake III 251

Horse Manders 251

Cinnamon Jumbles 252

Cinnamon Cakes 252

Jumbles 253

Jumbles II 253

Jumbles III 253

Jumbles IV 254

Molasses Gingerbread 254

Mrs Duffries Ginger Nuts 255

Soft Gingerbread 255

Soft Gingerbread 256

Ginger Cake 256

Hard Ginger Cakes 256

Newton Cakes 257

White Cake 257

White Cake II 257

Scotch Cake 258

Bannock 258

Angel’s Food Cake 259

Bisquit Souffle 260

Cup Cake 260

Cup Cake II 261

Cornstarch Cake 261

Spice Cake 262

Spice Cake II 262

One Egg Cake 263

Chocolate Cake 263

Vanilla Cake 264

Filling 264

Silver Cake 264

Golden Cake 265

A Cheaper Sponge Cake 265

White Sponge Cake 266

Sponge Cake 266

Sponge Cake II 266

Coconut Sponge Cake 267

White Cake 267

Wafer Cakes 268

Custard Cake 268

The Custard 268

Black Cake 269

Chocolate Fruit Cake 270

Icing for Cakes 270

Icing for Cake II 271

Preserves, Syrups, Cordials and Preserves

Strawberry Preserves 271

Cherry Preserves 272

Peach Preserves 272

Citron or Watermellon Preserves 273

Currant Jelly 273

Quince Jelly 274

Blackberry Jam 274

Red Raspberry Jam 274

To Brandy Greengages 275

Tomato Figs 275

Fresh Fig Preserves 276

Peach Marmalade 276

Orange Marmalade 277

Quince Preserves 277

Quince Marmalade 278

Pineapple Marmalade 278

Apple Marmalade 279

To Dry Cherries 279

To Dry Apples 280

Apple Butter 280

To Prepare Honey for Winter Use 280

Preserves, Syrups, Cordials and Preserves (Continued)

Egg Nogg 281

Lemon Syrup 281

Lemon Syrup II 281

Peach Cordial 282

Blackberry Cordial 282

Raspberry Cordial 283

Raspberry Vinegar 283

Punch a la Regent 284

Orange Cordial 284

Punch for Bottling 285

Whiskey Punch for Bottling 285

Currant Wine 286

Blackberry Wine 286

Candy 286

Taffy 287

Caramels 287

Chocolate Caramels 288

Philadelphia Walnut Candy 288

Pickles and Pickling

Pickles and Catsups to Green Pickles 288

Vinegar Preparation 289

To Green Pickles in The Fall 289

To Stuff Pickles 290

To Stuff Pickles II 291

Oiled Cucumbers 291

To Make Yellow Pickles 293

French Pickle 294

Rough and Ready Pickle 295

Sweet Canteloupe Pickle 296

Pickled Mushrooms 296

Green Tomato Pickle 297

Green Tomato Pickle II 298

Chow Chow 298

Cucumber Chow Chow 299

Cabbage Pickle 299

Spiced Peaches 300

Peach Mangoes 300

Stuffing for Forty Melons 301

Tomato Catsup 302

Tomato Catsup II 302

Green Tomato Catsup 303

Cucumber Catsup 303

Chili Sauce 304

Tomato Sauce 304

Venetian Pickle 305

Celery Vinegar 306

French Mustard 307

To Prepare Horseradish 307

To Prepare Horseradish II 307

Menus for Breakfasts, Lunches,

Suppers and Dinners

Spring Breakfast 308

Spring Breakfast II 308

Summer Breakfast 308

Summer Breakfast II 308

Summer Breakfast III 308

Fall Breakfast 308

Fall Breakfast II 309

Winter Breakfast 309

Winter Breakfast II 309

Winter Breakfast III 309

Spring Lunch 309

Spring Lunch II 310

Summer Lunch 310

Summer Lunch II 310

Fall Lunch 310

Fall Lunch II 310

Winter Lunch 310

Winter Lunch II 311

Winter Lunch III 311

Spring Dinner 311

Spring Dinner II 311

Spring Dinner III 311

Spring Dinner IV 311

Summer Dinner 311

Summer Dinner II 312

Summer Dinner III 312

Summer Dinner Iv 312

Summer Dinner V 312

Fall Dinner 312

Fall Dinner II 313

Fall Dinner III 313

Fall Dinner IV 313

Winter Dinner 313

Winter Dinner II 313

Winter Dinner III 314

Winter Dinner IV 314

Winter Dinner V 314

Winter Dinner VI 314

Winter Supper 314

Winter Supper II 315

In Season Foods By Month

Pages 315-318

Household Notes

Pages 318-323

Outdated Terms

  • Pulverized Sugar” is the same as “Powdered Sugar”
  • A “pint” is 2 cups and a “tumbler” is 1 cup.
  • A “gill” is ½ cup and a “wineglass” is ¼ cup.
  • A “jigger” is 1½ Ounces
  • A ”teacup” is approximately ¾ of a modern “cup”
  • A “coffee cup” is one modern cup (8 ounces)
  • Isinglass is a whitish very pure gelatin prepared from the air bladders of fishes (such as sturgeons) and used especially as a clarifying agent and in jellies and glue.

 

 

Approximate Oven Temperatures of Wood Fired Stoves in Fahrenheit

  • Cool Oven = 200°
  • Very Slow Oven = 250°
  • Slow Oven = 300° to 325°
  • Moderately Slow Oven = 325° to 350°
  • Moderate Oven = 350° to 375°
  • Moderately Hot Oven = 375° to 400°
  • Hot Oven = 400° to 450°
  • Very Hot or Fast Oven= 450° to 500°

Becky Thatcher was the romantic interest of Tom Sawyer in the “Adventures of Tom Sawyer” by Mark Twain. She lived in St. Petersburg, Missouri (based on Hannibal, Missouri) in the 1840s. Becky was the eleven year old daughter of Judge Thatcher.

In the nineteenth century, The American Dream was everyone’s Cinderella Story. But options were limited for young women, even those from financially-comfortable families. Their advancement was limited to marrying someone with exceptional prospects or who was from a more advantaged family than the woman’s own family.

To prepare for life with a higher financial status, young women were taught the basics of the running a “more cultured” household. In order to oversee staff and to assimilate into a more luxurious lifestyle, they often turned to cookeries —- Cookbooks that contained the recipes for dining, style and standard household chores.

If she failed to improve her status through marriage, the knowledge would be needed to perform the duties herself.

The Kentucky Housewife” was a cookery that was popular in the southern United States during the 1840s, and well into later years.

As is often the case, its “cultured” meals were often re-interpretations of meals that originally nourished the poorest of the poor. (For example, lobster was once a food that was reserved for prisoners, slaves and cattle. Tomatoes and potatoes were also foods that the wealthy once considered unfitting for their station in life.)

Many of Tom Sawyer’s adventures, like fishing or catching frogs and turtles, were as much about providing food to a family as they were about boys having fun.

Becky Thatcher didn’t appear in future Tom Sawyer books because her preparations for marriage would have prevented her from having the time for very many adventures away from home.

These recipes tell a story of a time when “… a woman’s work is never done” was simply a fact of a life, even in a life of luxury.

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